The year was 1996.   I had just been diagnosed with cancer and was focused on keeping my job and going through the chemotherapy at the same time.  Before long I was starting to experience the strain.  I would work my fulltime job and get my chemotherapy and go home crashing, too exhausted to do anything but sleep,   It was about that time that I started finding them:  Whole meals cooked and left on my porch!  I had no idea who left them but I thanked them every day in my thoughts.  It felt like I was surrounded by angels.  After six months of therapy I was finally in remission...thanks in part to the angels who fed me in my time of need.  

Comments
When I had surgery last year and could not cook Thanksgiving dinner. My daughter in laws Mom invited us. That was so nice. Eileen.

It was a simple, kind of unexpected thing when, entering my church, one of the lady greeters noticed that one of my shoes laces was loose and she very kindly tied it up. That made may day!

lovely 

 

I live in New York City where everybody is always in a rush. When I see a New York City Bus coming and before the driver rushes away from the curb, I tell them to hold the bus before he rushes out so someone will be on time wherever they maybe going too and not be late for their appointment or wherever they maybe going too.😄
It was the Christmas of 1992, the first Christmas after losing my 6 year old son. I was just leaving for work when a friend of the family showed up at our front door and told us someone had asked him to deliver a few things to us. Well a few things wound up being a couch overflowing with Christmas gifts for my other 2 boys, my husband and I. Next came 8 bags of groceries to make sure we had a wonderful Christmas meal. Our friend swore it was not from him but from a person in the community that chose a family every year who had gone through a tragic event that year. Because of this very generous person my two boys and my husband and I had a wonderful holiday that would not have happened if not for them.
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