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Message 31 of 40

nixon fires cox.jpg

 

 

U.S. Attorney General Elliot Richardson had appointed Cox after promising the that he would appoint a special prosecutor to investigate the events surrounding the break-in of the Democratic National Committee's offices at the Watergate Hotel.

The appointment was created as a career reserved position in the Justice department, meaning it came under the authority of the attorney general who could only remove the special prosecutor "for cause," e.g., gross improprieties or malfeasance in office. Richardson had, in his confirmation hearings before the U.S. Senate, promised not to use his authority to dismiss the Watergate special prosecutor, unless for cause.

When Cox issued a subpoena to Nixon, asking for copies of the tape recordings that were recorded in the Oval Office, the president refused to comply. Nixon then offered that Senator John Stennis of Mississippi to review and summarize the tapes for the special prosecutor's office. Cox refused the compromise.

However, the following day Nixon ordered Attorney General Richardson to fire Cox. Richardson refused and resigned in protest.

Nixon then ordered Deputy Attorney General William Ruckelshaus to fire Cox. Ruckelshaus also refused and resigned.

Nixon then ordered Robert Bork, as acting head of the Justice Department, to fire Cox. Bork later claimed he believed Nixon's order to be valid and appropriate. Bork wrote the letter firing Cox.

 

The night he was fired, Cox gave an impassioned news conference during which he said, “Whether ours shall continue to be a government of laws and not of men is now for Congress and ultimately the American people.”

 

Less than a week later, an NBC News poll showed that, for the first time, a plutality of U.S. citizens supported impeaching Nixon, with 44% in favor, 43% opposed, and 13% undecided.

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Message 32 of 40

@ls7731 wrote:

I think you are correct.  Just as a child tires of a new toy, so he will tire of the Presidency.  He is not receiving the "adoration" he so craves, and that's definitely a deal-breaker for Trump.  Either way, voluntarily or by impeachment, let's hope it's soon!!


It cannot come soon enough.

 

By what means?  Not something I have any say about, so long as it happens soon I'm down with it.

 

 

 

44>dolt45
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Message 33 of 40

 Cent-- I have never thought it was a matter if Donald Trump would be impeached. I always thought it was a matter of when he would be impeached.

Gee, I miss having a real President!!
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Message 34 of 40

I think you are correct.  Just as a child tires of a new toy, so he will tire of the Presidency.  He is not receiving the "adoration" he so craves, and that's definitely a deal-breaker for Trump.  Either way, voluntarily or by impeachment, let's hope it's soon!!

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Message 35 of 40
I bet he will quit while blaming people for not worshiping him enough.
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Message 36 of 40

It is indeed a sad state of affairs we have right now in this Country.  This man is a disgrace to the institution of Democracy and to all who have gone before, who often made great personal sacrifices to achieve what Trump is now so intent on destroying.  Noone and nothing  is safe or protected with this demagog at the helm. He is a power-hungry narcissist, "playing" in the political arena with people's lives.  He treats his role as a flamboyant entertainer, but this is not entertaining--his style is crude, unethical and uninformed.  Let's all stand together and make our opinions matter--together we CAN make a difference.

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Message 37 of 40

I think that Trump will break the law and charges will be brought against him. The Republicans will talk him into resigning with the promise that Pence will pardon him.

 

Trumplethinskin cannot last.


Man learns from history that man learns nothing from history.
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Message 38 of 40

@honyb64 wrote:

I can only hope that he is impeached and sent packing soon. If we get him out of the White House, I know that we will have to contend with Pence, but hopefully he will more concillatory when he sees the power that the American people hold over their elected officials. If we get rid of one, we can get rid of the other!

 

Welcome to the forum, honybee.....  A pleasure to meet your acquaintance.

 

I agree with you....but Pence at least understands what the government can and cannot do, unlike our current "pinhead".


 


"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in DC, 1/27/2017
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Message 39 of 40

I can only hope that he is impeached and sent packing soon. If we get him out of the White House, I know that we will have to contend with Pence, but hopefully he will more concillatory when he sees the power that the American people hold over their elected officials. If we get rid of one, we can get rid of the other!

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Will Donald Trump be Ousted in a Coup or Just Impeached?

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Message 40 of 40

Will Donald Trump be assassinated, ousted in a coup or just impeached?

 

trump_se

 

The ‘most deadly adversaries of republican government,’ wrote Alexander Hamilton, arise ‘chiefly from the desire in foreign powers to gain an improper ascendant in our councils. How could they better gratify this, than by raising a creature of their own to the chief magistracy of the Union?’ Hamilton’s warning against ‘intrigue, and corruption’, published in 1788, speaks eerily to the Washington of today, where Donald Trump’s enemies imagine he is a Russian ‘agent of influence,’ bought or blackmailed by the Kremlin. The new chief magistrate himself is in full Nixon mode, at war with the media, the intelligence community, the ‘establishment’ and the ‘rigged system’, even as he takes his place behind the desk in the Oval Office for the first time. The scandal — if that’s what it is — has now inevitably been titled ‘Watersportsgate’. Is it conceivable that, like Nixon, Trump might eventually be forced from office?

 

It seems absurd to ask this question in the week of the new President’s inauguration. Still, the Senate Intelligence Committee has already announced hearings into ‘links between Russia and individuals associated with political campaigns’. The committee’s Republican chairman issued a statement saying the inquiry would be ‘bipartisan’ and would rely on ‘the issuance of subpoenas if necessary to compel testimony… The Committee will follow the intelligence wherever it leads.’ If Trump’s staff or friends did meet with Russian officials to co-ordinate hacking the US presidential election, there is a word for that: treason, the first and most important of the ‘high crimes and misdemeanours’ set out in the constitution as grounds for impeachment. But Trump’s people have denied that any such meetings took place. And even if there were meetings, what was discussed? And if there were any discussions that would trouble a Senate committee, was Trump even aware? What did the President know and when did he know it?

 

If, if, if — a long chain of ifs. Importantly, there is almost no public discussion in Congress — from either party — of impeaching Trump. One of the very few to talk openly about the possibility was Congresswoman Maxine Walters, a Democrat, as you would expect. She told the cable news channel MSNBC that Trump had ‘wrapped his arms around Putin so tight… I don’t buy it, I don’t think the American people buy it, and he’s not going to get away with it. We’re going to investigate him and find out what is this real connection he’s got.’ She concluded: ‘Let’s find out… whether we’re putting a man in the most important office in the free world who may be held hostage by Putin and Russia.’ I was told by a senior Congressional aide that other House Democrats were keeping quiet until after the inauguration for tactical reasons. They recognised there was no support for hearings among the majority Republicans on the House Judiciary Committee, the place where any move to impeach would have to originate. This is not (yet) 1974.

 

more at:  http://www.spectator.co.uk/2017/01/will-donald-trump-be-assassinated-ousted-in-a-coup-or-just-impeac...


"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in DC, 1/27/2017
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