Reply
Social Butterfly

Why we're in such bad shape...

Reason 1.

After Considering $1 Billion Price Tag for Ventilators, White House Has Second Thoughts

 

 

[Kushner] has been directing officials at FEMA in the effort. Two officials said the suggestion to wait on the General Motors offer came from Col. Patrick Work, who is working at FEMA. Some government officials expressed concern about the possibility of ordering too many ventilators, leaving them with an expensive surplus.

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/26/us/politics/coronavirus-ventilators-trump.html?action=click&modul...

 

How can anyone think an expensive surplus is a bad thing? Has this crises not taught us that a new virus will always come along eventually and we'll use that surplus to save lives?

 

Buy the ventilators. Warehouse them in strategically placed distribution centers nationwide in a protective environment so they remain functional. Next pandemic National Guard trucks distribute them. Would this be expensive? Of course. But considering we just spent $2 trillion because we were unprepared have we not learned that billions spent correctly now could save the country from shutting down during the next superbug crises? And there will be another. No doubt about that after this.

 

The United States of America is worried about $1 billion for ventilators in the face of a growing epidemic while we are still unable to flatten the curve of infections?

 

Hey, Jared, there are Americans out there dying because they can't breathe.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0 Kudos
123 Views
1
Report
Social Butterfly

Reason 1A

 

The Road to Coronavirus Hell Was Paved by Evangelicals

By 

Ms. Stewart is the author of “The Power Worshippers: Inside the Dangerous Rise of Religious Nationalism.”

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/27/opinion/coronavirus-trump-evangelicals.html?action=click&module=O...

 

 

Not every pastor is behaving recklessly, of course, and not every churchgoer in these uncertain times is showing up for services out of disregard for the scientific evidence. Far from it. Yet none of the benign uses of religion in this time of crisis have anything to do with Mr. Trump’s expressed hope that the country would be “opened up and just raring to go by Easter.” He could, of course, have said, “by mid-April.” But Mr. Trump did not invoke Easter by accident, and many of his evangelical allies were pleased by his vision of “packed churches all over our country.”

“I think it would be a beautiful time,” the president said.

Religious nationalism has brought to American politics the conviction that our political differences are a battle between absolute evil and absolute good. When you’re engaged in a struggle between the “party of life” and the “party of death,” as some religious nationalists now frame our political divisions, you don’t need to worry about crafting careful policy based on expert opinion and analysis. Only a heroic leader, free from the scruples of political correctness, can save the righteous from the damned. Fealty to the cause is everything; fidelity to the facts means nothing. Perhaps this is why many Christian nationalist leaders greeted the news of the coronavirus as an insult to their chosen leader.

In an interview on March 13 on “Fox & Friends,” Jerry Falwell Jr., the president of Liberty University, called the response to Coronavirus “hype” and “overreacting.” “You know, impeachment didn’t work, and the Mueller report didn’t work, and Article 25 didn’t work, and so maybe now this is their next, ah, their next attempt to get Trump,” he said.

When Rev. Spell in Louisiana defied an order from Gov. John Bel Edwards and hosted in-person services for over 1,000 congregants, he asserted the ban was “politically motivated.” Figures like the anti-L.G.B.T. activist Steve Hotze added to the chorus, denouncing the concern as — you guessed it — “fake news.”

ADVERTISEMENT

0 Kudos
104 Views
0
Report
cancel
Showing results for 
Show  only  | Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Users
Announcements

Does AARP donate to political parties or endorse candidates?

AARP is strictly non-partisan and always has been. We never endorse or donate to candidates, political parties or political action committees.

Learn more.

AARP Members Only Games

Play members only games, like FIll Ins, Lumeno, 2048 and a collaborative, multiplayer Let's Crossword.

Play Now
AARP Members Only Games Logos
AARP Rewards

Solve Crosswords. Earn Rewards. Activate AARP Rewards to earn points for games, quizzes and videos. Redeem for deals and discounts.

Get started with AARP Rewards now!
/html/assets/Rewards-program-badge-355x224.png