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Why are people still racist?

Why are people still racist? What science says about America’s race problem.

 

Torch-bearing white supremacists shouting racist and anti-Semitic slogans. Protesters and counter protesters colliding with violence and chaos. A car driven by a known Nazi sympathizer mowing down a crowd of activists.

 

Many Americans responded to this weekend's violence in Charlottesville with disbelieving horror. How could this happen in America, in 2017? “This is not who we are,” said Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine (D).

 

And yet, this is who we are.

 

Amid our modern clashes, researchers in psychology, sociology and neurology have been studying the roots of racism. We draw on that research and asked two scientists to explain why people feel and act this way toward each other.

 

What causes people to be racist?

 

“In some ways, it’s super simple. People learn to be whatever their society and culture teaches them. We often assume that it takes parents actively teaching their kids, for them to be racist. The truth is that unless parents actively teach kids not to be racists, they will be,” said Jennifer Richeson, a Yale University social psychologist. “This is not the product of some deep-seated, evil heart that is cultivated. It comes from the environment, the air all around us.”

 

Richeson compares children's instinctive formation of biases to a student at a new school. “When you arrive at a new high school. You are instinctively trying to figure out who’s cool, who’s not, who’s a nerd, who gets beat up? Kids quickly acquire these associations,” she said.

 

To get a sense of just how pervasive and imperceptibly our environment can affect us, one study at Tufts University found that even with a TV show on mute displaying scenes with no explicit discrimination, the nonverbal body language of black and white actors interacting was enough to cause watchers to test higher for implicit bias afterward.

 

“An us-them mentality is unfortunately a really basic part of our biology,” said Eric Knowles, a psychology professor at New York University who studies prejudice and politics. “There’s a lot of evidence that people have an ingrained even evolved tendency toward people who are in our so-called 'in group.'”

 

But how we define those groups, and the tendency to draw divisions along racial lines, is social, not biological, he added. “We can draw those lines in a number of ways that society tells us,” he said. 

 

When does racism drive people to commit violence?

 

“The most likely predictor of that is exposure to a kind of ideology,” Knowles said. Most if not all people carry implicit biases and unexamined prejudices, he said, and some may harbor feelings of fear or resentment that they don’t express in public.

 

More at:   Why are people still racist? What science says about America’s race problem.

 

 


"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in DC, 1/27/2017
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"Not all racism is obvious. An employer might look through a list of job applicants and decide not to interview people with Arabic sounding surnames. Or a young guy from an African background might be followed around by security guards who assume he's going to steal something.

 

These kinds of racism can be much harder to address, because they involve the prejudices that we often don't talk or think about."

"Invisible" racism

 


"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in DC, 1/27/2017
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I guess that Tx is the one here that is being mentioned in many of the posts, although I have been quite clear on how I stand.
Scout, seems to blame Trump for the racism in the US  and finds any kind of excuse to blame the Republican Party of anything that he happens to dislike.
No wonder this country is so divided.  I don't think that any of you wouild know where to start.

You view races depending on your own political party.
have a very narrow view of minorities and their needs
And try to impose your own views on others. 
It is amazing as to  how closeminded many seem to be.
Sorry but if you think that with your views you are anywhere near to promote union or understanding of racism. hate to dissapoint you, but NO.
Your own political biases do not allow you to separate the issues.
So, here we are and here we will always be.
You can now attack me or say whatever you wish. I happen to hold in my little finger more knowledge on this subject than all of you combined. And if my words seem arrogant, is, because they are.

You all see racism with your own glasses, and cannot see this issue from others points of view
Good luck, but you will all fail.  as long as you cannot accept different points of view,

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I guess that Tx is the one here that is being mentioned in many of the posts, although I have been quite clear on how I stand.
Scout, seems to blame Trump for the racism in the US  and finds any kind of excuse to blame the Republican Party of anything that he happens to dislike.
No wonder this country is so divided.  I don't think that any of you wouild know where to start.

You view races depending on your own political party.
have a very narrow view of minorities and their needs
And try to impose your own views on others. 
It is amazing as to  how closeminded many seem to be.
Sorry but if you think that with your views you are anywhere near to promote union or understanding of racism. hate to dissapoint you, but NO.
Your own political biases do not allow you to separate the issues.
So, here we are and here we will ever be.
You can now attack me or say whatever you wish. I happen to hold in my little finger more knowledge on this subject than all of you combined. And if my words seem arrogant, is, because they are.

You all see racism with your own glasses, and cannot see this issue from others points of view
Good luck, but you will all fail.  as long as you cannot accept different points of view,

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@Roxanna35 wrote:

 

No wonder this country is so divided.  I don't think that any of you wouild know where to start.

 


Correct, it is those who are posting divisiveness and and attacking, yes attacking as we can see from the two posts in a lovefest with each other.  In my opinion those like that are no better than was the two sides in Charlottesville. 

 

They are that what they claim to be against.

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@CriticalThinking wrote:

Hey Centrist, I've taken a good look at your posts. Even though I don't always agree with you, I find them interesting and intelligent. And thank you for utilizing facts and logic, which seem to be foreign concepts to members of the Trump Cult. I just wish you would stop copying 25 paragraphs and would simply post your own words.

 

Centrist, don't you find it ironic when a poster claims to be a liberal for years, but after the White Rage candidate, Donald Trump is elected, he's suddenly a member of the Trump Cult? That means ignoring logic, facts, the truth, and defending Trump at all costs.


Good points, CeeTee.  Trump does attract mostly whites for sure and is a yuge hit with racists.

 

I find it interesting that anyone would change their political ideology simply because five people disagreed with them on equal rights, a mainstay of the Left.

 

So what are your thoughts on why people are still racist?  As we know, there aren't more racists than ever before; it's just that to many it's OK to be outwardly racist....I guess it's good to see them come out of the closet.  We know Trump made it acceptable.  But why do they find in their hearts that equality just doesn't apply to everyone?


"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in DC, 1/27/2017
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Just my opinion ............

 

I think that racism is often generated from unjustified fear. At other times it is a reflection of what they learned from others.


Man learns from history that man learns nothing from history.
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@ChasKy53 wrote:

Just my opinion ............

 

I think that racism is often generated from unjustified fear. At other times it is a reflection of what they learned from others.


I do believe that fear plays a very important fact is the racism that exists today. fear of loosing the American culture that is familiar to them.

Inmigrants have brought not only their customs but also many times the interjection of their culture into the American culture.
They fear that they are loosing the American identity

Again,  I do feel that the assimilation process that has existed in the US has not been effective. in transitioning these immigrants in accepting the American culture.
There is many things that the government could do in order to make that process easier for many.
Schools that would teach the language, history and customs . 
I feel that once the immigrants hits the American ground they are left alone to their own devices or to the family that have brought them into the US.
Perhaps the need for the translation of documents would not be that necessary if they would be able to learn the language and the customs. 
It is important for a nation to be multilingual, but also be assured that their own national identity is not diluted.



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@ChasKy53 wrote:

Just my opinion ............

 

I think that racism is often generated from unjustified fear. At other times it is a reflection of what they learned from others.

 

Good points, Chaz.  How do you think this applies to the KKK/NeoNazi's?  Do you think they fear minorities or is this mob mentality?  Or do you think they believe they are getting the short end of the stick.....you know, the "take back America" Klan?


 


"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in DC, 1/27/2017
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@Centristsin2010 wrote:

@ChasKy53 wrote:

Just my opinion ............

 

I think that racism is often generated from unjustified fear. At other times it is a reflection of what they learned from others.

 

Good points, Chaz.  How do you think this applies to the KKK/NeoNazi's?  Do you think they fear minorities or is this mob mentality?  Or do you think they believe they are getting the short end of the stick.....you know, the "take back America" Klan?


 


 

Not Chaz, but seems the neoNazis had some fear of other races that was nurtured by others - family, friends, the Internet, etc.. Things like Der Trumper and mass rallies give them the sense they are not alone, this gives them power and the sense of power drives them to commit acts of violence they feel are morally justified by those others who agree. Now they've got POTUS agreeing and using their tactics from the World's Greatest Bully-pulpit.

 

The fact their spiritual antecedents tried to "take back America" 1861-1865 and lost just makes them glorify the leaders of that terrible war and warp it into a crusaide for their "Nobel Cause" - racial superority enshrined in Law FOREVER.

Social Butterfly

We fear most what we know least.   More interaction with each other racees would help.  

 Lucky the kid that attends a multiple race school. It would be great to have television shows to  help  us become more familiar with other races.   

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@mimi0000 wrote:

We fear most what we know least.   More interaction with each other racees would help.  

 Lucky the kid that attends a multiple race school. It would be great to have television shows to  help  us become more familiar with other races.   


Can you really say, that we actually fear a kid that happens to be American(Cuban) of an American (mexican) or a black (africam American)
How can a kid that was born here and speaks English and goes to school would provide you with more familiarity  with other races?

Would a kid (Asian)American born here would you really need to understand the Asian culture?
The are as Americans as you are, see the same TV shows, movies, go to the same stores, buy the same records and DVD's   go to the same churches
Why would you in this case feel that you need to be familiar with these kids? and their races/nationality?
In the case of the Blacks, they have been here for generations? what is it that you need to learn about them?

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@Roxanna35 wrote:

@mimi0000 wrote:

We fear most what we know least.   More interaction with each other racees would help.  

 Lucky the kid that attends a multiple race school. It would be great to have television shows to  help  us become more familiar with other races.   


Can you really say, that we actually fear a kid that happens to be American(Cuban) of an American (mexican) or a black (africam American)
How can a kid that was born here and speaks English and goes to school would provide you with more familiarity  with other races?

Would a kid (Asian)American born here would you really need to understand the Asian culture?
The are as Americans as you are, see the same TV shows, movies, go to the same stores, buy the same records and DVD's   go to the same churches
Why would you in this case feel that you need to be familiar with these kids? and their races/nationality?
In the case of the Blacks, they have been here for generations? what is it that you need to learn about them?


They can teach you a lot.   It's not Asian culture they show you, but Asian American.   And Asian is a misnomer, anyway, including people from mainland China, Taiwan, India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, and more.   

 

Almost all my neighbors are immigrants.   The kids are born here.   They are from Argentina, Russia, Eritrea, China, Iran, Korea, Japan, Bangladesh, and India.   Food, music, religion, choice of sports, choice of musical instruments.   Dinner times.  That's a big one in our neighborhood.  My youngest kid is the only one who eats at 5:30.  All the rest of the neighorhood kids seem to eat at 9 or 10 at night.  

 

We get more Chinese candy at Halloween than any other type. 

 

One of my son's Korean-American friends is teaching him to play the gayageum.  I never would have known what that was, if not for the neighbors. 

 

So while they bond over Minecraft and Chesskid.com and Despacito (god help me), they learn a lot of other things from one another, too. 

 

And it's great.   

 

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@NerdyMom wrote:


They can teach you a lot.   It's not Asian culture they show you, but Asian American.   And Asian is a misnomer, anyway, including people from mainland China, Taiwan, India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, and more.   

 

There are many children of Asian immigrants (especially) who are more American than Asian.  Our children never bothered to learn the language their mother's native language.  We have noticed children of other immigrants (where both parents are immigrants) who cannot speak their language.

 

My wife came here with me 46 years ago, in fact she was the first Vietnamese in our area, this was 1972, long before Saigon fell. She has been well received both here and when we was stationed in Germany.  At Fort Hood we owned a trailer, and when first moving into the trailer park, she sent our son around to the neighbors with a small plate of her foods.  They had to return the plate and afterwards our yard was a neigherhood gathering place.

 

Over the years,  in our small town, she has become well known and well liked by all, regardless of skin color and especially for her cooking.  Not bad for someone, who until she came to America, had never set foot in a kitchen, and never knew what one looked like.  She was raised with servants to perform every task.  We joke that I took her away from all of that!

 

It can depend upon the person.

 

 She has never identified herself as a hyphenated American, but just as a plain American.  Much of the hyphenation label is applied by others. 

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@NerdyMom wrote:

@Roxanna35 wrote:

@mimi0000 wrote:

We fear most what we know least.   More interaction with each other racees would help.  

 Lucky the kid that attends a multiple race school. It would be great to have television shows to  help  us become more familiar with other races.   


Can you really say, that we actually fear a kid that happens to be American(Cuban) of an American (mexican) or a black (africam American)
How can a kid that was born here and speaks English and goes to school would provide you with more familiarity  with other races?

Would a kid (Asian)American born here would you really need to understand the Asian culture?
The are as Americans as you are, see the same TV shows, movies, go to the same stores, buy the same records and DVD's   go to the same churches
Why would you in this case feel that you need to be familiar with these kids? and their races/nationality?
In the case of the Blacks, they have been here for generations? what is it that you need to learn about them?


They can teach you a lot.   It's not Asian culture they show you, but Asian American.   And Asian is a misnomer, anyway, including people from mainland China, Taiwan, India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, and more.   

 

Almost all my neighbors are immigrants.   The kids are born here.   They are from Argentina, Russia, Eritrea, China, Iran, Korea, Japan, Bangladesh, and India.   Food, music, religion, choice of sports, choice of musical instruments.   Dinner times.  That's a big one in our neighborhood.  My youngest kid is the only one who eats at 5:30.  All the rest of the neighorhood kids seem to eat at 9 or 10 at night.  

 

We get more Chinese candy at Halloween than any other type. 

 

One of my son's Korean-American friends is teaching him to play the gayageum.  I never would have known what that was, if not for the neighbors. 

 

So while they bond over Minecraft and Chesskid.com and Despacito (god help me), they learn a lot of other things from one another, too. 

 

And it's great.   

 


I see, and I understand, one question, would  being first generation American be a factor in what you are saying? and would that be differnt if they were 2nd and third generation American, would they be able to teach what you are being taught now?

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Rker, my grandparents are from Scotland  and I have taught my immigrant husband and my kids to do first footing. My son is learning to play bagpipes. Of course it's not as much. But it's still there.

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@NerdyMom wrote:

Rker, my grandparents are from Scotland  and I have taught my immigrant husband and my kids to do first footing. My son is learning to play bagpipes. Of course it's not as much. But it's still there.


I am quite sure that your children are never goint to be called, Scotish Americans, I have not idea as to the nationality/race of your immigrant husband.  but it will depend on where he comes from/

I have taught my children many of my Cuba customs there is nothing wrong with that? I have tought them spanish, they are bilingual. and  apparently they are still Cuban Americans. Figure that?

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@Roxanna35 wrote:

@NerdyMom wrote:

Rker, my grandparents are from Scotland  and I have taught my immigrant husband and my kids to do first footing. My son is learning to play bagpipes. Of course it's not as much. But it's still there.


I am quite sure that your children are never goint to be called, Scotish Americans, I have not idea as to the nationality/race of your immigrant husband.  but it will depend on where he comes from/

I have taught my children many of my Cuba customs there is nothing wrong with that? I have tought them spanish, they are bilingual. and  apparently they are still Cuban Americans. Figure that?


If your prior post was trying to get at what 3rd generation children of immigrants are called, I missed that.  

 

My kids are Muslim.   They are the ones all the conservatives want to deport.  

 

I'm not sure about the rest of your post.   There is absolutely nothing wrong with teaching your kids your heritage.  To me, it's critical that you do so.   It is their heritage, too.  Their lives become an amalgam of their history and their present.   To me, America is not a melting pot.  It's more like a vegetable stew. All different flavors that complement one another, not erase one another.  

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@NerdyMom wrote:

 

.There is absolutely nothing wrong with teaching your kids your heritage.


But teaching them to be American is paramount above all else.  Our children were taught to be Americans first, then their Mother's native heritage.  They are at home with eating with chopsticks or with utensils, and with Vietnamese foods or American. 

 

 

 

 

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@TxGrandpa2 wrote:

@NerdyMom wrote:

 

.There is absolutely nothing wrong with teaching your kids your heritage.


But teaching them to be American is paramount above all else.  Our children were taught to be Americans first, then their Mother's native heritage.  They are at home with eating with chopsticks or with utensils, and with Vietnamese foods or American. 

 

 

 

 


I think it's probably more apparent to immigrants that children born here can't be anything other than American.   As Arab as I think my kids are sometimes, my husband marvels at how American they are.   They are steeped in the culture and really have no other choice.   FWIW, I think my home and family feel 85% American (my white European heritage with the American twist), and 15% Arab (my husband's heritage).  

 

Anyway, Vietnam?  If your wife can make pho, I'm super envious.  I have tried several times and cannot replicate an authentic recipe.   😄

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@NerdyMom wrote:


I think it's probably more apparent to immigrants that children born here can't be anything other than American. 

 

Anyway, Vietnam?  If your wife can make pho, I'm super envious.  I have tried several times and cannot replicate an authentic recipe.   😄


From what we've seen, and speaking for those who came here as refugees, I would believe that is true.  Of course my wife and I came [back] here back in1972, years before the influx of refugees.  Back then we had problems finding Asian food stores, so she had to improvise.

 

As I posted, she came from a upper class family [her father was a Colonel in the South Vietnamese Army until he was killed in action], and she had no idea of what a kitchen looked like or how to cook.  She actually learned to cook from my Dad, I could burn water.  She improvised by remembering how food tasted.

 

And yes, her Pho draws praise from even Vietnamese friends...the first thing our son and daughter in law wants when they come down from Fort Worth..there is a large Vietnamese population, along with restaurants.  Everyone is always asking for her recipe, but cannot make it like her.  She also makes good chả giò or Vietnamese egg rolls which people beg for.  That and other foods like ham hock soup [she makes several gallons fo our son to take home] and other foods. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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@TxGrandpa2 wrote:

@NerdyMom wrote:

 

.There is absolutely nothing wrong with teaching your kids your heritage.


But teaching them to be American is paramount above all else.  Our children were taught to be Americans first, then their Mother's native heritage.  They are at home with eating with chopsticks or with utensils, and with Vietnamese foods or American. 

 

 

 So you made certain they knew and could speak Cherokee? 

It's one of the original American languages - and incidentally - one you have an ancestral/genetic link to...

For the same reason, my wife and I taught our children to speak Navajo - another of the original American languages.

 

English is a johnny-come-lately squatter.

 

In the part of the country where I was born and raised, It will be over a hundred years before English has been spoken as long as Spanish, and many thousands more before English has been spoken as long as still spoken Indian languages.

 

Your "opinion" is - "interesting" - considering that absolutely everyone here - if not a first generation immigrant - is the descendant of an immigrant.

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