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Why are people still racist?

Why are people still racist? What science says about America’s race problem.

 

Torch-bearing white supremacists shouting racist and anti-Semitic slogans. Protesters and counter protesters colliding with violence and chaos. A car driven by a known Nazi sympathizer mowing down a crowd of activists.

 

Many Americans responded to this weekend's violence in Charlottesville with disbelieving horror. How could this happen in America, in 2017? “This is not who we are,” said Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine (D).

 

And yet, this is who we are.

 

Amid our modern clashes, researchers in psychology, sociology and neurology have been studying the roots of racism. We draw on that research and asked two scientists to explain why people feel and act this way toward each other.

 

What causes people to be racist?

 

“In some ways, it’s super simple. People learn to be whatever their society and culture teaches them. We often assume that it takes parents actively teaching their kids, for them to be racist. The truth is that unless parents actively teach kids not to be racists, they will be,” said Jennifer Richeson, a Yale University social psychologist. “This is not the product of some deep-seated, evil heart that is cultivated. It comes from the environment, the air all around us.”

 

Richeson compares children's instinctive formation of biases to a student at a new school. “When you arrive at a new high school. You are instinctively trying to figure out who’s cool, who’s not, who’s a nerd, who gets beat up? Kids quickly acquire these associations,” she said.

 

To get a sense of just how pervasive and imperceptibly our environment can affect us, one study at Tufts University found that even with a TV show on mute displaying scenes with no explicit discrimination, the nonverbal body language of black and white actors interacting was enough to cause watchers to test higher for implicit bias afterward.

 

“An us-them mentality is unfortunately a really basic part of our biology,” said Eric Knowles, a psychology professor at New York University who studies prejudice and politics. “There’s a lot of evidence that people have an ingrained even evolved tendency toward people who are in our so-called 'in group.'”

 

But how we define those groups, and the tendency to draw divisions along racial lines, is social, not biological, he added. “We can draw those lines in a number of ways that society tells us,” he said. 

 

When does racism drive people to commit violence?

 

“The most likely predictor of that is exposure to a kind of ideology,” Knowles said. Most if not all people carry implicit biases and unexamined prejudices, he said, and some may harbor feelings of fear or resentment that they don’t express in public.

 

More at:   Why are people still racist? What science says about America’s race problem.

 

 


"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in DC, 1/27/2017
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@NerdyMom wrote:


They can teach you a lot.   It's not Asian culture they show you, but Asian American.   And Asian is a misnomer, anyway, including people from mainland China, Taiwan, India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, and more.   

 

There are many children of Asian immigrants (especially) who are more American than Asian.  Our children never bothered to learn the language their mother's native language.  We have noticed children of other immigrants (where both parents are immigrants) who cannot speak their language.

 

My wife came here with me 46 years ago, in fact she was the first Vietnamese in our area, this was 1972, long before Saigon fell. She has been well received both here and when we was stationed in Germany.  At Fort Hood we owned a trailer, and when first moving into the trailer park, she sent our son around to the neighbors with a small plate of her foods.  They had to return the plate and afterwards our yard was a neigherhood gathering place.

 

Over the years,  in our small town, she has become well known and well liked by all, regardless of skin color and especially for her cooking.  Not bad for someone, who until she came to America, had never set foot in a kitchen, and never knew what one looked like.  She was raised with servants to perform every task.  We joke that I took her away from all of that!

 

It can depend upon the person.

 

 She has never identified herself as a hyphenated American, but just as a plain American.  Much of the hyphenation label is applied by others. 

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@NerdyMom wrote:

@Roxanna35 wrote:

@mimi0000 wrote:

We fear most what we know least.   More interaction with each other racees would help.  

 Lucky the kid that attends a multiple race school. It would be great to have television shows to  help  us become more familiar with other races.   


Can you really say, that we actually fear a kid that happens to be American(Cuban) of an American (mexican) or a black (africam American)
How can a kid that was born here and speaks English and goes to school would provide you with more familiarity  with other races?

Would a kid (Asian)American born here would you really need to understand the Asian culture?
The are as Americans as you are, see the same TV shows, movies, go to the same stores, buy the same records and DVD's   go to the same churches
Why would you in this case feel that you need to be familiar with these kids? and their races/nationality?
In the case of the Blacks, they have been here for generations? what is it that you need to learn about them?


They can teach you a lot.   It's not Asian culture they show you, but Asian American.   And Asian is a misnomer, anyway, including people from mainland China, Taiwan, India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, and more.   

 

Almost all my neighbors are immigrants.   The kids are born here.   They are from Argentina, Russia, Eritrea, China, Iran, Korea, Japan, Bangladesh, and India.   Food, music, religion, choice of sports, choice of musical instruments.   Dinner times.  That's a big one in our neighborhood.  My youngest kid is the only one who eats at 5:30.  All the rest of the neighorhood kids seem to eat at 9 or 10 at night.  

 

We get more Chinese candy at Halloween than any other type. 

 

One of my son's Korean-American friends is teaching him to play the gayageum.  I never would have known what that was, if not for the neighbors. 

 

So while they bond over Minecraft and Chesskid.com and Despacito (god help me), they learn a lot of other things from one another, too. 

 

And it's great.   

 


I see, and I understand, one question, would  being first generation American be a factor in what you are saying? and would that be differnt if they were 2nd and third generation American, would they be able to teach what you are being taught now?

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Rker, my grandparents are from Scotland  and I have taught my immigrant husband and my kids to do first footing. My son is learning to play bagpipes. Of course it's not as much. But it's still there.

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@NerdyMom wrote:

Rker, my grandparents are from Scotland  and I have taught my immigrant husband and my kids to do first footing. My son is learning to play bagpipes. Of course it's not as much. But it's still there.


I am quite sure that your children are never goint to be called, Scotish Americans, I have not idea as to the nationality/race of your immigrant husband.  but it will depend on where he comes from/

I have taught my children many of my Cuba customs there is nothing wrong with that? I have tought them spanish, they are bilingual. and  apparently they are still Cuban Americans. Figure that?

no name
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@Roxanna35 wrote:

@NerdyMom wrote:

Rker, my grandparents are from Scotland  and I have taught my immigrant husband and my kids to do first footing. My son is learning to play bagpipes. Of course it's not as much. But it's still there.


I am quite sure that your children are never goint to be called, Scotish Americans, I have not idea as to the nationality/race of your immigrant husband.  but it will depend on where he comes from/

I have taught my children many of my Cuba customs there is nothing wrong with that? I have tought them spanish, they are bilingual. and  apparently they are still Cuban Americans. Figure that?


If your prior post was trying to get at what 3rd generation children of immigrants are called, I missed that.  

 

My kids are Muslim.   They are the ones all the conservatives want to deport.  

 

I'm not sure about the rest of your post.   There is absolutely nothing wrong with teaching your kids your heritage.  To me, it's critical that you do so.   It is their heritage, too.  Their lives become an amalgam of their history and their present.   To me, America is not a melting pot.  It's more like a vegetable stew. All different flavors that complement one another, not erase one another.  

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@NerdyMom wrote:

 

.There is absolutely nothing wrong with teaching your kids your heritage.


But teaching them to be American is paramount above all else.  Our children were taught to be Americans first, then their Mother's native heritage.  They are at home with eating with chopsticks or with utensils, and with Vietnamese foods or American. 

 

 

 

 

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@TxGrandpa2 wrote:

@NerdyMom wrote:

 

.There is absolutely nothing wrong with teaching your kids your heritage.


But teaching them to be American is paramount above all else.  Our children were taught to be Americans first, then their Mother's native heritage.  They are at home with eating with chopsticks or with utensils, and with Vietnamese foods or American. 

 

 

 

 


I think it's probably more apparent to immigrants that children born here can't be anything other than American.   As Arab as I think my kids are sometimes, my husband marvels at how American they are.   They are steeped in the culture and really have no other choice.   FWIW, I think my home and family feel 85% American (my white European heritage with the American twist), and 15% Arab (my husband's heritage).  

 

Anyway, Vietnam?  If your wife can make pho, I'm super envious.  I have tried several times and cannot replicate an authentic recipe.   😄

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@NerdyMom wrote:


I think it's probably more apparent to immigrants that children born here can't be anything other than American. 

 

Anyway, Vietnam?  If your wife can make pho, I'm super envious.  I have tried several times and cannot replicate an authentic recipe.   😄


From what we've seen, and speaking for those who came here as refugees, I would believe that is true.  Of course my wife and I came [back] here back in1972, years before the influx of refugees.  Back then we had problems finding Asian food stores, so she had to improvise.

 

As I posted, she came from a upper class family [her father was a Colonel in the South Vietnamese Army until he was killed in action], and she had no idea of what a kitchen looked like or how to cook.  She actually learned to cook from my Dad, I could burn water.  She improvised by remembering how food tasted.

 

And yes, her Pho draws praise from even Vietnamese friends...the first thing our son and daughter in law wants when they come down from Fort Worth..there is a large Vietnamese population, along with restaurants.  Everyone is always asking for her recipe, but cannot make it like her.  She also makes good chả giò or Vietnamese egg rolls which people beg for.  That and other foods like ham hock soup [she makes several gallons fo our son to take home] and other foods. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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@TxGrandpa2 wrote:

@NerdyMom wrote:

 

.There is absolutely nothing wrong with teaching your kids your heritage.


But teaching them to be American is paramount above all else.  Our children were taught to be Americans first, then their Mother's native heritage.  They are at home with eating with chopsticks or with utensils, and with Vietnamese foods or American. 

 

 

 So you made certain they knew and could speak Cherokee? 

It's one of the original American languages - and incidentally - one you have an ancestral/genetic link to...

For the same reason, my wife and I taught our children to speak Navajo - another of the original American languages.

 

English is a johnny-come-lately squatter.

 

In the part of the country where I was born and raised, It will be over a hundred years before English has been spoken as long as Spanish, and many thousands more before English has been spoken as long as still spoken Indian languages.

 

Your "opinion" is - "interesting" - considering that absolutely everyone here - if not a first generation immigrant - is the descendant of an immigrant.

44>dolt45
Honored Social Butterfly

I've found that if you have to start a sentence with 'I'm not racist, but...' then chances are you're pretty racist. 


"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in DC, 1/27/2017
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@alferdpacker wrote:

 So you made certain they knew and could speak Cherokee? 





Did you read the part of my post where I said 'their Mother's' native heritage?  Why should we teach them Cherokee.  We did learn some Welsh from a gentleman in South England who shares our family name...

 

But nothing was mentioned about languages, but Cherokee was also being spoken before Europeans arrived.

 

As far as your referring to yourself, I'm still waiting for your autobiography to be published.

 

Here's a song for you, given your wide experiences:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ov4epAJRPMw

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@TxGrandpa2 wrote:

@alferdpacker wrote:

 So you made certain they knew and could speak Cherokee? 





Did you read the part of my post where I said 'their Mother's' native heritage?  Why should we teach them Cherokee.  We did learn some Welsh from a gentleman in South England who shares our family name...

 

But nothing was mentioned about languages, but Cherokee was also being spoken before Europeans arrived.

 

As far as your referring to yourself, I'm still waiting American Composerfor your autobiography to be published.

 

Here's a song for you, given your wide experiences:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ov4epAJRPMw


Uh huh...   Suuurre...

 

I've always viewed jealousy as a self-destructive emotion.

 

In his world famous album, one of the very early uses of serialism in popular music, titled "We're Only In It For The Money", the American composer, Frank Zappa wrote two sequential stylistically different pieces - the first known as "What's the ugliest part of your body?" - the second immediately following it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y_ch7doLoZc

 

Now, "of course" that Frank Zappa composition is not at all intended as a personal attack upon you - even though your link to a song - written by Australian country singer Greoff Mack - reworded with American place names and sung by Johnny Cash - was an obvious personal attack on me.

My selection of that particular Frank Zappa composition is a commentary upon the credulous conservative crackpots who voted for Goldwater, Nixon, Ford, Reagan, Bush 41, Bush 43, McCain, Romney, and Dolt 45.

It's all in one's point of view, isn't it?

44>dolt45
Honored Social Butterfly

If the goal of this discussion is to win an argument. then in that case, I don't think that my opinion is really what I would like to write about.

I   understand the diverse opinions on this issue, But,I fail to understand the bullying that has accompanied the responses.

The continuous attacks that have enfollowed when views do not coincide have been quite interesting.

It  reminds me of this actual Administration, in which any kind of view that does not coincide with their goal, the response is "you are fired"
I am not going to continue to argue an issue that has been present in this country now for generations.
Posters are more than free to adopt whichever view they happen to like the best.
I still feeel that my children will always be Americans, and never Cuban Americans.
They do not have to wear on their sleeves the nationality of their parents.  They respect it, then embrace it, but, their loyalties are with this country and not with the country of their parents.
I have been successful to instill that notion of where their loyalties should lie.
The only Cuban American in this family is me. and I also know as the citizen of this country where my loyalties are expected to lie.
So feeling proud of one's own heritage, has nothing to do with the fact that they are Americans and very proud of it.
They know the language of their parents, they know the custom of their parents and they also know the customs and culture of their country of birth and respect both.
As first generation Americans will engage in the proper assimilation that takes place to any first generation Americans. And eventually their children and grandchildren will pretty much blur those lines.Until then, I will not accept the title of Cuban Americans for my children, This is where thery were born, this is their country.. and yes, they are only Americans

 

 

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Interesting post, rker; your passion comes in loud and clear.

 

I think if you go back and read the posts, you'll note the bullying was self-inflicted with your comments like, "I don't care what you think" and "your opinion doesn't matter" (paraphrasing of course) to someone whose goal was only to understand your point and not to "win an argument".

 

You obviously have strong feelings about hyphenated heritage indicators and that's fair, real and raw for you and that's cool.  But it may be useful to look at the issue more broadly when considering racism.  I'm betting not one of the Nazi's and KKK and White Supremacists in Charlettesville two weeks ago used the term, African-Amercans and if they did, many might see it as a sign of respect.


"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in DC, 1/27/2017
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We're still racist because Nixon's Southern Strategy requires Republicans to support and defend racism, albiet with great stealth...until Der Trumper was elected and began pushing the notion a number of "good people" are Nazis and KKK.

 

Be advised folks, anytime you hear a GOPer praise the wonders of States Rights, their objective is to deprive you of some Rights, either your civil liberties, your wealth or your National Heritage represented by our National Parks.

 

"States Rights" is how we get Gerrymanders, re-segregated schools, unlimited interest charges on your credit cards and Fracking on public lands.

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@Olderscout66 wrote:

 Nixon's Southern Strategy ... Der Trumper was elected and began pushing the notion a number of "good people" are Nazis and KKK.

 


The usual buzz words Nixon and Southern Strategy, Der Trumper, etc.  And even throwing it 'National Heritage' while among the crowd here denying anyone elses heritage. 

 

Basically what your post says is the you are against the Southern region of the United States, you like posting 'Der Trumper' regardless of the topic, among other things.  And everything from history is Trump's fault. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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@Olderscout66 wrote:

We're still racist because Nixon's Southern Strategy requires Republicans to support and defend racism, albiet with great stealth...until Der Trumper was elected and began pushing the notion a number of "good people" are Nazis and KKK.

 

Be advised folks, anytime you hear a GOPer praise the wonders of States Rights, their objective is to deprive you of some Rights, either your civil liberties, your wealth or your National Heritage represented by our National Parks.

 

"States Rights" is how we get Gerrymanders, re-segregated schools, unlimited interest charges on your credit cards and Fracking on public lands.


Absolutely right, Scout.  The Repubs prefer to drive a wedge between the races as evidenced by the "Unite The Right" gathering in C-Ville, a poster here doing exactly what FoxNews does, posting pictures of minorities arrested for crimes and dumbing down racism to a hyphen.

 

We all know it's a difficult topic for many to discuss, but it's more difficult for those who can't look at themselves in the mirror with regard to the topic.

 

Obviously, we have a long way to go....


"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in DC, 1/27/2017
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@Centristsin2010 wrote:

We all know it's a difficult topic for many to discuss, but it's more difficult for those who can't look at themselves in the mirror with regard to the topic.

 

 


Have you taken a good look yourself to see how you come across to others? 

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@Centristsin2010 wrote:

@Olderscout66 wrote:

We're still racist because Nixon's Southern Strategy requires Republicans to support and defend racism, albiet with great stealth...until Der Trumper was elected and began pushing the notion a number of "good people" are Nazis and KKK.

 

Be advised folks, anytime you hear a GOPer praise the wonders of States Rights, their objective is to deprive you of some Rights, either your civil liberties, your wealth or your National Heritage represented by our National Parks.

 

"States Rights" is how we get Gerrymanders, re-segregated schools, unlimited interest charges on your credit cards and Fracking on public lands.


Absolutely right, Scout.  The Repubs prefer to drive a wedge between the races as evidenced by the "Unite The Right" gathering in C-Ville, a poster here doing exactly what FoxNews does, posting pictures of minorities arrested for crimes and dumbing down racism to a hyphen.   OH, OH, dear, I guess you couldn't help yourself and brimg me up in this post LOL

 

We all know it's a difficult topic for many to discuss, but it's more difficult for those who can't look at themselves in the mirror with regard to the topic.  LOL  LOL  LOL yes dear , you mean that you will look at yourself in the topic or this discussion?

 

Obviously, we have a long way to go....


 

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Honored Social Butterfly

Scout, Racism has existed before your "friend"  Trump ever got here. No doubt that he has exarcebated the issue. but, it has always existed.  You really cannot give Trump the glory of being him that has instituted racism in the  US

no name
Honored Social Butterfly

Centrist,  I knew that you couldn't resist my post and had to post the last word, yes, read your own post and practice what you preach. especially your own words.

But it may be useful to look at the issue more broadly when considering racism.  
I happen to know first hand as to how many hyphenated American feel, perhaps they are not willing to speak honestly with just an American. that has such a very biased outlook on what is racism.

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@Roxanna35 wrote:

Centrist,  I knew that you couldn't resist my post and had to post the last word,

 

Clearly you have a different view of others and that's fine.  It's not about "having the last word" as you suggest, it's about an attempt at understanding....a discussion.  I encourage you to put your passion aside and read the earlier posts where you told another you didn't care what they thought and just attacked them.  That's not a "discussion", it's telling another you know better and just shut-up and accept what I'm saying.....not conducive to good discussion in any format.

 

yes, read your own post and practice what you preach. especially your own words.

But it may be useful to look at the issue more broadly when considering racism.  

 

Thank you for your advice and rest-assured, I am following what I preach.....I know racism isn't limited to a simple hyphen, especially when many minorities use the hyphen themselves to describe their heritage.


I happen to know first hand as to how many hyphenated American feel, perhaps they are not willing to speak honestly with just an American. that has such a very biased outlook on what is racism.  I would imagine you do how you feel and those in your community, and I note the angst you have for Americans when you write, "just an American", when you yourself are pleading to be called "an American" and not a Cuban-American.  It's clear your intent is to strike out at others who don't share or understand your view.  Why is it clear?  Because you're unable to say what others "very biased outlook on what is racism" actually is.  What is their outlook?


"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in DC, 1/27/2017
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@Centristsin2010 wrote:

 I note the angst you have for Americans when you write, "just an American", when you yourself are pleading to be called "an American" and not a Cuban-American.  It's clear your intent is to strike out at others who don't share or understand your view. 

How are you to know how Rker feels, I really doubt that you have been called a hyphenated American.   You are doing the same as compartimizing immigrants or others with a foreign background.  That is as bigoted as denigrating other race.  Another form of elitism to make one feel superior...especially when a person takes exception.  

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@Olderscout66  It's truly amazing what one can fantasize in their own minds in a lame attempt to attack others.  It's sad to witness here, isn't it?

 

Once again some demonstrate an inability to discuss challenging subjects and therefore must resort to personal attacks.  It's a pity.


"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in DC, 1/27/2017
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@Centristsin2010 wrote:

@Olderscout66  It's truly amazing what one can fantasize in their own minds in a lame attempt to attack others.  It's sad to witness here, isn't it?

 

Once again some demonstrate an inability to discuss challenging subjects and therefore must resort to personal attacks.  It's a pity.



Yes it is,  but it isn't a personal attack 'to call' someone when thay say to another poster to look in a mirror regarding their post.   Are you qualified to challenge someone when they post about their feelings about being called a hyphenated American?

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@Centristsin2010 wrote:

@Roxanna35 wrote:

Centrist,  I knew that you couldn't resist my post and had to post the last word,

 

Clearly you have a different view of others and that's fine.  It's not about "having the last word" as you suggest, it's about an attempt at understanding....a discussion.  I encourage you to put your passion aside and read the earlier posts where you told another you didn't care what they thought and just attacked them.  That's not a "discussion", it's telling another you know better and just shut-up and accept what I'm saying.....not conducive to good discussion in any format.   LOL  LOL  LOL  I see that you cannot help yourself as far as providing us with your comments.  LOL  

 

yes, read your own post and practice what you preach. especially your own words.

But it may be useful to look at the issue more broadly when considering racism.  

 

Thank you for your advice and rest-assured, I am following what I preach.....I know racism isn't limited to a simple hyphen, especially when many minorities use the hyphen themselves to describe their heritage. Then do accept the fact that many call themselfve as they do. to make that difference quite clear. 


I happen to know first hand as to how many hyphenated American feel, perhaps they are not willing to speak honestly with just an American. that has such a very biased outlook on what is racism.  I would imagine you do how you feel and those in your community, and I note the angst you have for Americans when you write, "just an American", when you yourself are pleading to be called "an American" and not a Cuban-American.  It's clear your intent is to strike out at others who don't share or understand your view.  Why is it clear?  Because you're unable to say what others "very biased outlook on what is racism" actually is.  What is their outlook?
Well, that is how people see me. not I.   I see myself as an .American but many see me as a Cuban American if an Amrican at all. LOL Give it up.  Centrist,   your need to lear a lot about minorities,  and by the way, your ethocentricity is showing really loud and clear.


 

no name
Honored Social Butterfly

Why are some people still racist?  It very well may be due in part because some look for very simplistic causes because they can't grasp the real causes.

I'm Proud to be a Hyphenated-American

 

As we embark to celebrate another 4th of July to commemorate our country’s Independence from the British, I’m reminded of how divided we are around the notion of how to define “American."

 

A reader of my column recently lamented that her co-worker is taking a political stand by using the term, “American” to describe anyone born in this country regardless of ethnic heritage as a means of appearing color-blind. In this example, while the notion of being “color-blind sounds laudable, it can also be interpreted as being insensitive to someone’s background, history, and culture. The reader explains, “Call me overly prideful but I strongly prefer the term Asian-American because just saying ‘American’ the way my co-worker did is a tad disrespectful of my family's heritage and our origins and how they shape us today”.

 

Keep in mind the controversy of hyphenated Americans is not new in this country. Nearly one hundred nears ago in 1915, as America was on the brink of entering World War I, former President Theodore Roosevelt was also openly critical of Americans who had this split identity. In a speech to a largely Irish Catholic audience he left no doubt where he stood on this issue:

 

“There is no room in this country for hyphenated Americanism. When I refer to hyphenated Americans, I do not refer to naturalized Americans. Some of the very best Americans I have ever known were naturalized Americans, Americans born abroad. But a hyphenated American is not an American at all … The one absolutely certain way of bringing this nation to ruin, of preventing all possibility of its continuing to be a nation at all, would be to permit it to become a tangle of squabbling nationalities, an intricate knot of German-Americans, Irish-Americans, English-Americans, French-Americans, Scandinavian-Americans or Italian-Americans, each preserving its separate nationality, each at heart feeling more sympathy with Europeans of that nationality, than with the other citizens of the American Republic … There is no such thing as a hyphenated American who is a good American. The only man who is a good American is the man who is an American and nothing else.”1

 

Part of the fear from that era was the need for Americans to feel united and reassured in the face of war. Former president Woodrow Wilson also echoed Roosevelt’s concerns, by saying "Any man who carries a hyphen about with him carries a dagger that he is ready to plunge into the vitals of this Republic whenever he gets ready." 2

 

This nationalistic fervor and fear of ethnic Americans betraying their country was best exemplified during World War II as more than 110,000 Japanese-Americans were sent to internment camps with grave concerns they would betray their allegiance to America.

 

Today, the issue of hyphenated Americans remains a concern possibly due to our country’s immigration policies and the impact of diversity on the American psyche. Conservative radio talk-show host, Rush Limbaugh goes so far as to differentiate between past immigrants and today’s newer arrivals. “Italian-Americans came, and they became Americans. They held on to their traditions and there were Little Italy’s in various cities around and all the vestiges. But they were Americans first, not Italians first. And they were not demanding that America change to accommodate what they had brought with them. They changed to fit into what America was. They essentially were assimilating into a distinct American culture that they craved to be part of.” 3

 

Limbaugh’s concern isn’t so much of the hyphenated brand of Americans as much as the desire for assimilation. How we define assimilation is a topic unto itself but it’s worth noting that Italian-Americans, German-Americans, and earlier European immigrants don’t carry the perceived stigma or threat of loyalty as much as that of say an Arab-American, Mexican American, or Asian-American.

 

So despite the advances this country has made in terms of tolerance and inclusion, there’s still the real fear of racial divisions and in-group classification leading to a fragmentation or disintegration of American society. I wholeheartedly disagree with that fear as my own identification as a Chinese-American in no way lessens my patriotism or allegiance to the United States. If anything, it magnifies my loyalty since the description of myself as Chinese-American or Asian-American is to inform others of my Americanism while also paying tribute and acknowledging the part of me that is different from that of an Italian-American or Jewish-American. I am comfortable with cultural differences because I believe those differences is what makes us even more “American”.

 

I'm Proud to be a Hyphenated-American

 

It's obvious to many that those who CHOOSE to use a hyphen to describe their nationalities are proud of their heritage and rightfully so and using this hyphen in describing them is to HONOR their choice and is not racist at all.


"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in DC, 1/27/2017
Honored Social Butterfly


@Centristsin2010 wrote:

Why are some people still racist?  It very well may be due in part because some look for very simplistic causes because they can't grasp the real causes.

I'm Proud to be a Hyphenated-American

 

As we embark to celebrate another 4th of July to commemorate our country’s Independence from the British, I’m reminded of how divided we are around the notion of how to define “American."

 

A reader of my column recently lamented that her co-worker is taking a political stand by using the term, “American” to describe anyone born in this country regardless of ethnic heritage as a means of appearing color-blind. In this example, while the notion of being “color-blind sounds laudable, it can also be interpreted as being insensitive to someone’s background, history, and culture. The reader explains, “Call me overly prideful but I strongly prefer the term Asian-American because just saying ‘American’ the way my co-worker did is a tad disrespectful of my family's heritage and our origins and how they shape us today”.

 

Keep in mind the controversy of hyphenated Americans is not new in this country. Nearly one hundred nears ago in 1915, as America was on the brink of entering World War I, former President Theodore Roosevelt was also openly critical of Americans who had this split identity. In a speech to a largely Irish Catholic audience he left no doubt where he stood on this issue:

 

“There is no room in this country for hyphenated Americanism. When I refer to hyphenated Americans, I do not refer to naturalized Americans. Some of the very best Americans I have ever known were naturalized Americans, Americans born abroad. But a hyphenated American is not an American at all … The one absolutely certain way of bringing this nation to ruin, of preventing all possibility of its continuing to be a nation at all, would be to permit it to become a tangle of squabbling nationalities, an intricate knot of German-Americans, Irish-Americans, English-Americans, French-Americans, Scandinavian-Americans or Italian-Americans, each preserving its separate nationality, each at heart feeling more sympathy with Europeans of that nationality, than with the other citizens of the American Republic … There is no such thing as a hyphenated American who is a good American. The only man who is a good American is the man who is an American and nothing else.”1

 

Part of the fear from that era was the need for Americans to feel united and reassured in the face of war. Former president Woodrow Wilson also echoed Roosevelt’s concerns, by saying "Any man who carries a hyphen about with him carries a dagger that he is ready to plunge into the vitals of this Republic whenever he gets ready." 2

 

This nationalistic fervor and fear of ethnic Americans betraying their country was best exemplified during World War II as more than 110,000 Japanese-Americans were sent to internment camps with grave concerns they would betray their allegiance to America.

 

Today, the issue of hyphenated Americans remains a concern possibly due to our country’s immigration policies and the impact of diversity on the American psyche. Conservative radio talk-show host, Rush Limbaugh goes so far as to differentiate between past immigrants and today’s newer arrivals. “Italian-Americans came, and they became Americans. They held on to their traditions and there were Little Italy’s in various cities around and all the vestiges. But they were Americans first, not Italians first. And they were not demanding that America change to accommodate what they had brought with them. They changed to fit into what America was. They essentially were assimilating into a distinct American culture that they craved to be part of.” 3

 

Limbaugh’s concern isn’t so much of the hyphenated brand of Americans as much as the desire for assimilation. How we define assimilation is a topic unto itself but it’s worth noting that Italian-Americans, German-Americans, and earlier European immigrants don’t carry the perceived stigma or threat of loyalty as much as that of say an Arab-American, Mexican American, or Asian-American.

 

So despite the advances this country has made in terms of tolerance and inclusion, there’s still the real fear of racial divisions and in-group classification leading to a fragmentation or disintegration of American society. I wholeheartedly disagree with that fear as my own identification as a Chinese-American in no way lessens my patriotism or allegiance to the United States. If anything, it magnifies my loyalty since the description of myself as Chinese-American or Asian-American is to inform others of my Americanism while also paying tribute and acknowledging the part of me that is different from that of an Italian-American or Jewish-American. I am comfortable with cultural differences because I believe those differences is what makes us even more “American”.

 

I'm Proud to be a Hyphenated-American

 

It's obvious to many that those who CHOOSE to use a hyphen to describe their nationalities are proud of their heritage and rightfully so and using this hyphen in describing them is to HONOR their choice and is not racist at all.


Yours is one of the few that actually addressed the topic  - Why are people still racist.

 

The first word of the topic - "why" requires that various causal factors for the obviously illogical and irrational thought processes and behavior referred to as racism be identified and verified as the "why".

 

Any opinion that any one race is superior to any other is obviously erroneous, illogical, irrational and invalid - in short - dead wrong.

 

It appears that simplistic cause and effect "thinking" has always driven various forms of rationalizations for racism - among them the wholly irrational and invalid assumption that melanin deficient humans are somehow superior to those with more melanin or those with epicanthic folds or other irrelevant external differences.

 

Language?  Don't be silly.  The vast majority of the world's greatest minds in all fields did not grow up speaking the "american" version of the English Language.

 

Racism is simple thinking for simple minds.

 

OCD is a mental disorder.

 

Paranoia is a mental disorder.

 

Phobias are the result of irrationally disordered thinking/perception.

 

Racism is the result of irrationally disordered thinking/perception.

 

Yep - they be cray cray, irrational - and therefore dangerous.

 

Their kids may require closer than average scrutiny.

 

Freedom of thought and speech?   Sure - let 'em rant...

 

That's how society can recognize those whose thoughts, intents, and actions may well end up being deleterious to the long term good of the nation.

 

 That's one causal factor identified - there are more...

 

44>dolt45
Honored Social Butterfly


@Centristsin2010 wrote:

Why are some people still racist?  It very well may be due in part because some look for very simplistic causes because they can't grasp the real causes.

I'm Proud to be a Hyphenated-American   Good for you. I guess that from now on we should call you Irish Amrerican.

 

As we embark to celebrate another 4th of July to commemorate our country’s Independence from the British, I’m reminded of how divided we are around the notion of how to define “American." You better believe it.

 

A reader of my column recently lamented that her co-worker is taking a political stand by using the term, “American” to describe anyone born in this country regardless of ethnic heritage as a means of appearing color-blind. In this example, while the notion of being “color-blind sounds laudable, it can also be interpreted as being insensitive to someone’s background, history, and culture. The reader explains, “Call me overly prideful but I strongly prefer the term Asian-American because just saying ‘American’ the way my co-worker did is a tad disrespectful of my family's heritage and our origins and how they shape us today”. Bull ,an American doesn't call another Ammerican by any other name. It is the fact that those Americans with some nationality differences. (hispanics,negro, Asian) are th e ones that unfortunately call thembselves hyphenated Americans because they have seen that is how others see them. An Amrican in the example, is pretty arrogant. by not recognizing from the beginning that those people were notn hypherated Americans but Amercians from the beginning. her actions denote the division that exists today. 

 

Keep in mind the controversy of hyphenated Americans is not new in this country. Nearly one hundred nears ago in 1915, as America was on the brink of entering World War I, former President Theodore Roosevelt was also openly critical of Americans who had this split identity. In a speech to a largely Irish Catholic audience he left no doubt where he stood on this issue: And will be here forever, because of the lack of understanding the roots of racism.,

 

“There is no room in this country for hyphenated Americanism. When I refer to hyphenated Americans, I do not refer to naturalized Americans. Some of the very best Americans I have ever known were naturalized Americans, Americans born abroad. But a hyphenated American is not an American at all … The one absolutely certain way of bringing this nation to ruin, of preventing all possibility of its continuing to be a nation at all, would be to permit it to become a tangle of squabbling nationalities, an intricate knot of German-Americans, Irish-Americans, English-Americans, French-Americans, Scandinavian-Americans or Italian-Americans, each preserving its separate nationality, each at heart feeling more sympathy with Europeans of that nationality, than with the other citizens of the American Republic … There is no such thing as a hyphenated American who is a good American. The only man who is a good American is the man who is an American and nothing else.”1 Correct, there is no good American that doesn't feel that he is first an American.

 

Part of the fear from that era was the need for Americans to feel united and reassured in the face of war. Former president Woodrow Wilson also echoed Roosevelt’s concerns, by saying "Any man who carries a hyphen about with him carries a dagger that he is ready to plunge into the vitals of this Republic whenever he gets ready." 2 He may have had a point/ luck at what is happening in this country with the muslim Americans.

 

This nationalistic fervor and fear of ethnic Americans betraying their country was best exemplified during World War II as more than 110,000 Japanese-Americans were sent to internment camps with grave concerns they would betray their allegiance to America. And it probably exists today with our new enemies.

 

Today, the issue of hyphenated Americans remains a concern possibly due to our country’s immigration policies and the impact of diversity on the American psyche. Conservative radio talk-show host, Rush Limbaugh goes so far as to differentiate between past immigrants and today’s newer arrivals. “Italian-Americans came, and they became Americans. They held on to their traditions and there were Little Italy’s in various cities around and all the vestiges. But they were Americans first, not Italians first. And they were not demanding that America change to accommodate what they had brought with them. They changed to fit into what America was. They essentially were assimilating into a distinct American culture that they craved to be part of.” 3 iPity that that example has not continued in todays Ameriica. we wouldn't see the division that we see today.

 

Limbaugh’s concern isn’t so much of the hyphenated brand of Americans as much as the desire for assimilation. How we define assimilation is a topic unto itself but it’s worth noting that Italian-Americans, German-Americans, and earlier European immigrants don’t carry the perceived stigma or threat of loyalty as much as that of say an Arab-American, Mexican American, or Asian-American. I truly believe that the government has failed in helping with the assimilation process of new Naturalized Americans. and perhaps that is the disconnect that we see.

 

So despite the advances this country has made in terms of tolerance and inclusion, there’s still the real fear of racial divisions and in-group classification leading to a fragmentation or disintegration of American society. I wholeheartedly disagree with that fear as my own identification as a Chinese-American in no way lessens my patriotism or allegiance to the United States. If anything, it magnifies my loyalty since the description of myself as Chinese-American or Asian-American is to inform others of my Americanism while also paying tribute and acknowledging the part of me that is different from that of an Italian-American or Jewish-American. I am comfortable with cultural differences because I believe those differences is what makes us even more “American”. Lack of assimilation process is perhaps a possible problem as to the divisions that we see today. 

 

I'm Proud to be a Hyphenated-American

 

It's obvious to many that those who CHOOSE to use a hyphen to describe their nationalities are proud of their heritage and rightfully so and using this hyphen in describing them is to HONOR their choice and is not racist at all.


Being proud of one's heritage has nothing to do with not being seen as Americans, and a hyphenated American is viewed by others as different. It is not the persont that feels proud of their heritage is the ones around them.

no name
Honored Social Butterfly


@Roxanna35 wrote:

@Centristsin2010 wrote:

Why are some people still racist?  It very well may be due in part because some look for very simplistic causes because they can't grasp the real causes.

I'm Proud to be a Hyphenated-American   Good for you. I guess that from now on we should call you Irish Amrerican.  Had you been paying attention, you would have noted that "I'm proud to be a hyphenated-American" was the headline of an article.  Looks like you were too soon to jump.  btw, the author is Chinese-American, and not "Irish-American".

 

As we embark to celebrate another 4th of July to commemorate our country’s Independence from the British, I’m reminded of how divided we are around the notion of how to define “American." You better believe it.

 

A reader of my column recently lamented that her co-worker is taking a political stand by using the term, “American” to describe anyone born in this country regardless of ethnic heritage as a means of appearing color-blind. In this example, while the notion of being “color-blind sounds laudable, it can also be interpreted as being insensitive to someone’s background, history, and culture. The reader explains, “Call me overly prideful but I strongly prefer the term Asian-American because just saying ‘American’ the way my co-worker did is a tad disrespectful of my family's heritage and our origins and how they shape us today”. Bull ,an American doesn't call another Ammerican by any other name. It is the fact that those Americans with some nationality differences. (hispanics,negro, Asian) are th e ones that unfortunately call thembselves hyphenated Americans because they have seen that is how others see them. An Amrican in the example, is pretty arrogant. by not recognizing from the beginning that those people were notn hypherated Americans but Amercians from the beginning. her actions denote the division that exists today.   You'll need to take your argument up with the author of the artcle.  He makes an excellent point which counters your view.  You have insisted your view is accurate, apparently some think otherwise and embrace their heritage and THEIR hyphen..

 

Keep in mind the controversy of hyphenated Americans is not new in this country. Nearly one hundred nears ago in 1915, as America was on the brink of entering World War I, former President Theodore Roosevelt was also openly critical of Americans who had this split identity. In a speech to a largely Irish Catholic audience he left no doubt where he stood on this issue: And will be here forever, because of the lack of understanding the roots of racism.,  Especially if some insist the roots are based on a "hyphen".

 

“There is no room in this country for hyphenated Americanism. When I refer to hyphenated Americans, I do not refer to naturalized Americans. Some of the very best Americans I have ever known were naturalized Americans, Americans born abroad. But a hyphenated American is not an American at all … The one absolutely certain way of bringing this nation to ruin, of preventing all possibility of its continuing to be a nation at all, would be to permit it to become a tangle of squabbling nationalities, an intricate knot of German-Americans, Irish-Americans, English-Americans, French-Americans, Scandinavian-Americans or Italian-Americans, each preserving its separate nationality, each at heart feeling more sympathy with Europeans of that nationality, than with the other citizens of the American Republic … There is no such thing as a hyphenated American who is a good American. The only man who is a good American is the man who is an American and nothing else.”1 Correct, there is no good American that doesn't feel that he is first an American.  And using a hyphen changes nothing.  To many, they may FEEL like they are  Americans as Wilson said, but they still can identify themselves with a hyphen.

 

Part of the fear from that era was the need for Americans to feel united and reassured in the face of war. Former president Woodrow Wilson also echoed Roosevelt’s concerns, by saying "Any man who carries a hyphen about with him carries a dagger that he is ready to plunge into the vitals of this Republic whenever he gets ready." 2 He may have had a point/ luck at what is happening in this country with the muslim Americans.  Oh my, a racist comment.  It wasn't necessary.

 

This nationalistic fervor and fear of ethnic Americans betraying their country was best exemplified during World War II as more than 110,000 Japanese-Americans were sent to internment camps with grave concerns they would betray their allegiance to America. And it probably exists today with our new enemies.

 

Today, the issue of hyphenated Americans remains a concern possibly due to our country’s immigration policies and the impact of diversity on the American psyche. Conservative radio talk-show host, Rush Limbaugh goes so far as to differentiate between past immigrants and today’s newer arrivals. “Italian-Americans came, and they became Americans. They held on to their traditions and there were Little Italy’s in various cities around and all the vestiges. But they were Americans first, not Italians first. And they were not demanding that America change to accommodate what they had brought with them. They changed to fit into what America was. They essentially were assimilating into a distinct American culture that they craved to be part of.” 3 iPity that that example has not continued in todays Ameriica. we wouldn't see the division that we see today.  Most realize racism is far deeper than a hyphenated word. Most doubt trump discrimnated against blacks renting his apartments because how they answered the question "do you identify yourself as an African-American or black"?

 

Limbaugh’s concern isn’t so much of the hyphenated brand of Americans as much as the desire for assimilation. How we define assimilation is a topic unto itself but it’s worth noting that Italian-Americans, German-Americans, and earlier European immigrants don’t carry the perceived stigma or threat of loyalty as much as that of say an Arab-American, Mexican American, or Asian-American. I truly believe that the government has failed in helping with the assimilation process of new Naturalized Americans. and perhaps that is the disconnect that we see.  What do you think the government should/can do better?

 

So despite the advances this country has made in terms of tolerance and inclusion, there’s still the real fear of racial divisions and in-group classification leading to a fragmentation or disintegration of American society. I wholeheartedly disagree with that fear as my own identification as a Chinese-American in no way lessens my patriotism or allegiance to the United States. If anything, it magnifies my loyalty since the description of myself as Chinese-American or Asian-American is to inform others of my Americanism while also paying tribute and acknowledging the part of me that is different from that of an Italian-American or Jewish-American. I am comfortable with cultural differences because I believe those differences is what makes us even more “American”. Lack of assimilation process is perhaps a possible problem as to the divisions that we see today.  What process is "lacking"?

 

I'm Proud to be a Hyphenated-American

 

It's obvious to many that those who CHOOSE to use a hyphen to describe their nationalities are proud of their heritage and rightfully so and using this hyphen in describing them is to HONOR their choice and is not racist at all.


Being proud of one's heritage has nothing to do with not being seen as Americans, and a hyphenated American is viewed by others as different.  Maybe you should speak for yourself instead of "others".  I don't view anyone who describes themselves with a hyphenated heritage as "different".  It is not the persont that feels proud of their heritage is the ones around them.  So if someone PROUDLY say's they are an African-American, what does that do to what you think of them?


"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in DC, 1/27/2017
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