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Honored Social Butterfly

Why are people still racist?

Why are people still racist? What science says about America’s race problem.

 

Torch-bearing white supremacists shouting racist and anti-Semitic slogans. Protesters and counter protesters colliding with violence and chaos. A car driven by a known Nazi sympathizer mowing down a crowd of activists.

 

Many Americans responded to this weekend's violence in Charlottesville with disbelieving horror. How could this happen in America, in 2017? “This is not who we are,” said Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine (D).

 

And yet, this is who we are.

 

Amid our modern clashes, researchers in psychology, sociology and neurology have been studying the roots of racism. We draw on that research and asked two scientists to explain why people feel and act this way toward each other.

 

What causes people to be racist?

 

“In some ways, it’s super simple. People learn to be whatever their society and culture teaches them. We often assume that it takes parents actively teaching their kids, for them to be racist. The truth is that unless parents actively teach kids not to be racists, they will be,” said Jennifer Richeson, a Yale University social psychologist. “This is not the product of some deep-seated, evil heart that is cultivated. It comes from the environment, the air all around us.”

 

Richeson compares children's instinctive formation of biases to a student at a new school. “When you arrive at a new high school. You are instinctively trying to figure out who’s cool, who’s not, who’s a nerd, who gets beat up? Kids quickly acquire these associations,” she said.

 

To get a sense of just how pervasive and imperceptibly our environment can affect us, one study at Tufts University found that even with a TV show on mute displaying scenes with no explicit discrimination, the nonverbal body language of black and white actors interacting was enough to cause watchers to test higher for implicit bias afterward.

 

“An us-them mentality is unfortunately a really basic part of our biology,” said Eric Knowles, a psychology professor at New York University who studies prejudice and politics. “There’s a lot of evidence that people have an ingrained even evolved tendency toward people who are in our so-called 'in group.'”

 

But how we define those groups, and the tendency to draw divisions along racial lines, is social, not biological, he added. “We can draw those lines in a number of ways that society tells us,” he said. 

 

When does racism drive people to commit violence?

 

“The most likely predictor of that is exposure to a kind of ideology,” Knowles said. Most if not all people carry implicit biases and unexamined prejudices, he said, and some may harbor feelings of fear or resentment that they don’t express in public.

 

More at:   Why are people still racist? What science says about America’s race problem.

 

 


"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in DC, 1/27/2017
Honored Social Butterfly


@TxGrandpa2 wrote:


Can you explain why Confederate statues wasn't a problem during the Obama administration, but during others it is?

No wonder your responses sound so disingenuous.

 

You actually believe that Confederate statues weren't a problem to the Black Community until TRUMP took office!!!!

 

To be in 2017 and have someone who exhibits that type of blindness to the concerns of our Black fellow citizens amazes me. I thought that type of thinking went out with the 1950's.

 

Blacks have always expressed opposition to monuments and statues dedicated to the Confederacy. They have always found these symbols of slavery repugnant.

 

And yet, you think the negativism toward these symbols began recently.

 

And you say you have close Black friends????? I think not.

 

 

NO! IT'S CONSERVATIVES THAT ARE NUTTIER THAN SQUIRREL POOP!
Honored Social Butterfly


@nctarheel wrote:

 

And you say you have close Black friends????? I think not.

 

 


If you think that without knowing me personally or my background, then your thinking is competely far out.  It's easy for you to accuse others while failing to give out any halfway personal information.  But your posts say much about you...negatively.

 

And you completely fail to answer, like another poster, why during Obama's presidency nothing was said about these statues, or even about bringing the nation together.  But of course he was able to interfere with a local matter when his friend Henry Louis Gates Jr was erroneosly arrested on a local matter. 

 

Apparently you like the other poster are more interested in creating division rather than honestly attempting to approach matters.

 

As far as you accusation about Black friends, perhaps the same question should be asked of you?  What have you done in the area of supporting Blacks?   All we get from you is accusations and a desire to go after others. 

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@TxGrandpa2 wrote:

 

And you completely fail to answer, like another poster, why during Obama's presidency nothing was said about these statues, or even about bringing the nation together.  

 

As far as you accusation about Black friends, perhaps the same question should be asked of you?  What have you done in the area of supporting Blacks?  


And, even in your response, you still don't recognize that these symbols of hate and slavery have always been abhorrent to Black people. Rather than defend your philosophy, you spend time answering questions with questions.

 

You gloss over the feelings of Black people as you continue to follow a philosophy straight out of the 1950's. The feelings of Blacks weren't important back then so rarely did you see the "body politic"  or society address anything from a Black point of view. Many found that to be a comfortable position.... especially if you were White.

 

But you take the argument even one step further. and it is very interesting what step you take.

 

While at least 8 or 9 Presidents have served with these statues in place, and you could have named any of them for inaction .......... you concentrate on the response only from a Black Presidency.

 

That is certainly not by mistake.

 

I guess there are those that also say the HOLOCAUST was the JEWS fault.

 

Same philosophy.

 

The reason your previous posts stand out is because you are more upset about the WHITE reaction to these symbols of racism and slavery.

 

Black people have always thought the statues and monuments were abhorrent symbols and wished for their exit but they never had the power politically to challenge these symbols. With many WHITE people joining them in challenging the continuance of publicly displaying these symbols of hate..... there is now a chance to rid ourselves of honoring a group of people who fought against OUR country as TRAITORS and thought OWNING other men was a system worth preserving.

 

Actually, the fight to remove these symbols of hate and slavery is bringing people of different races together rather than breaking them apart............. except for the racist element in our White society, like TRUMP and others.

NO! IT'S CONSERVATIVES THAT ARE NUTTIER THAN SQUIRREL POOP!
Honored Social Butterfly


@nctarheel wrote:

 

While at least 8 or 9 Presidents have served with these statues in place, and you could have named any of them for inaction .......... you concentrate on the response only from a Black Presidency.

 

That is certainly not by mistake.

 

I guess there are those that also say the HOLOCAUST was the JEWS fault.

 

Same philosophy.

 



You keep invoking the Holocaust frequently, much like attempting to hide behind it for personal reasons.  What does it have to do with a majority of discussions here?  Why do you keep bringing it up? 

 

And why wasn't having a Black President an opportunity to work together for cohesion and togetherness of the country and races?  He had the opportunity, but instead came across as the opposite.

 

You still haven't made a case of why when Obama was the President, there was very little whimper about racism, but now its a frequent topic.  He did stick up for his Black friends on local matters such as in his home town of Chicago he ignored using his position to address the problem of 'lower class'
Blacks...

Honored Social Butterfly


@TxGrandpa2 wrote:

@nctarheel wrote:

 

While at least 8 or 9 Presidents have served with these statues in place, and you could have named any of them for inaction .......... you concentrate on the response only from a Black Presidency.

 

That is certainly not by mistake.

 

I guess there are those that also say the HOLOCAUST was the JEWS fault.

 

Same philosophy.

 



You keep invoking the Holocaust frequently, much like attempting to hide behind it for personal reasons. 

 

And why wasn't having a Black President an opportunity to work together for cohesion and togetherness of the country and races?  He had the opportunity, but instead came across as the opposite.

 

You still haven't made a case of why when Obama was the President, there was very little whimper about racism, but now its a frequent topic. 


So your entire response is now:

 

(1) Questions answered with questions

(2) The targeting of a Black President

(3) The targeting of a Jewish poster.

 

I guess that answers the question posed in the title of the thread.

NO! IT'S CONSERVATIVES THAT ARE NUTTIER THAN SQUIRREL POOP!
Honored Social Butterfly


@nctarheel wrote:

The targeting of a Jewish poster.


You can't stand on your own merits but have to hide behind your religion?  No one is supposed to disagree because of that?  You are the one who keeps bringing up your ethnic background and throwing it at others.

 

And how has anyone been targeting you?  If you cannot stand on your own merits, then why are you posting on this or any discussion site?

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@TxGrandpa2 wrote:


You are the one who keeps bringing up your ethnic background and throwing it at others.

 If you cannot stand on your own merits, then why are you posting on this or any discussion site?


Spoken by one who invokes their Cherokee background when convenient, their wife's minority status when convenient, their royal English ancestors when convenient, and their military service when convenient.

NO! IT'S CONSERVATIVES THAT ARE NUTTIER THAN SQUIRREL POOP!
Honored Social Butterfly


@nctarheel wrote:


Spoken by one who invokes their Cherokee background when convenient, their wife's minority status when convenient, their royal English ancestors when convenient, and their military service when convenient.


So what's your problem?  Jealous of not having a personal diverse background, posted about being a military vet, but won't post some type of proof, and continually throws up your ethnicity and uses it as a shield  when one disagrees with you, claiming they are biased? 

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@TxGrandpa2 wrote:

@nctarheel wrote:


Spoken by one who invokes their Cherokee background when convenient, their wife's minority status when convenient, their royal English ancestors when convenient, and their military service when convenient.


So what's your problem?  Jealous of not having a personal diverse background, posted about being a military vet, but won't post some type of proof, and continually throws up your ethnicity and uses it as a shield  when one disagrees with you, claiming they are biased? 


I have no problem.

 

It is obvious that you invoke these things to cloak that you aren't responding to the question at hand.

 

You have yet to respond to my question why you target Obama's Administration vis-a-vis these statues and monuments and ignored the other Presidents that have held office since they were erected.

 

You have yet to respond to my question concerning a conversation I had with another poster where you have information I believe you shouldn't have had access to.

 

You respond to almost all questions posed to you in this manner as you skirt answer after answer.

NO! IT'S CONSERVATIVES THAT ARE NUTTIER THAN SQUIRREL POOP!
Honored Social Butterfly


@nctarheel wrote:

 

You have yet to respond to ........




Yet you have never responded to any questions asked, but demand for yourself.  Your silence speaks loudly.

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@TxGrandpa2 wrote:

@nctarheel wrote:

 

You have yet to respond to ........




Yet you have never responded to any questions asked, but demand for yourself.  Your silence speaks loudly.


Giggle - snort - guffaw - has every appearance of the pot calling the kettle black.

44>dolt45
Honored Social Butterfly

What makes race so hard for white people to talk about? For many, topics of race and racism trigger intense emotional reactions for a few reasons:

 

  1. They’re not used to it: As the longtime racial majority in the US, white people experience little, if any, race-based stress. When it is experienced, it’s usually only temporary, superficial, and/or by choice. There’s a running joke that you can’t call a white man anything that particularly insults him at the identity level except for racist or sexist—that joke is about white fragility. Louis C.K. expands upon this in one of his routines, stating that the worst thing you can call a white man is “cracker,” but even that harkens back to “a time of owning land and people”—a power position and, therefore, not particularly hurtful. Because white people haven’t been fundamentally exposed to race-based stress, they have high expectations for racial comfort. It’s not only that whites aren’t accustomed to race-based discomfort—it’s a novel type of stress that they have pretty much no practice coping with. Words like “low-income,” “urban,” and “under-resourced” are comfortable because they’re terms used by the media to describe “other” people (i.e. non-whites). On the flip side, words like “white,” “advantaged,” and “privileged,” ignite in us an emotional reaction because suddenly the finger is pointed at us—we are suddenly the problem—and we are overwhelmed by feelings of guilt, shame, and blame. When that happens, all emotional hell breaks loose because we just don’t have the tolerance to deal with it, and, depending on your personality, tend to either erupt or shut-down.

The scientific way to train white people to stop being racist


"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in DC, 1/27/2017
Honored Social Butterfly


@Centristsin2010 wrote:

What makes race so hard for white people to talk about? For many, topics of race and racism trigger intense emotional reactions for a few reasons:

 

2.  They’re not used to it: As the longtime racial majority in the US, white people experience little, if any, race-based stress. When it is experienced, it’s usually only temporary, superficial, and/or by choice. There’s a running joke that you can’t call a white man anything that particularly insults him at the identity level except for racist or sexist—that joke is about white fragility. Louis C.K. expands upon this in one of his routines, stating that the worst thing you can call a white man is “cracker,” but even that harkens back to “a time of owning land and people”—a power position and, therefore, not particularly hurtful. Because white people haven’t been fundamentally exposed to race-based stress, they have high expectations for racial comfort. It’s not only that whites aren’t accustomed to race-based discomfort—it’s a novel type of stress that they have pretty much no practice coping with. Words like “low-income,” “urban,” and “under-resourced” are comfortable because they’re terms used by the media to describe “other” people (i.e. non-whites). On the flip side, words like “white,” “advantaged,” and “privileged,” ignite in us an emotional reaction because suddenly the finger is pointed at us—we are suddenly the problem—and we are overwhelmed by feelings of guilt, shame, and blame. When that happens, all emotional hell breaks loose because we just don’t have the tolerance to deal with it, and, depending on your personality, tend to either erupt or shut-down.

The scientific way to train white people to stop being racist


 

 

What makes race so hard for white people to talk about? For many, topics of race and racism trigger intense emotional reactions for a few reasons:

 

  1. They don’t see it: Often times, talking about race with white people is like talking about water with a fish. Dr. Derald W. Sue (2004) conducted a series of interviews in San Francisco, with some great quotes from white people answering the prompt, “What does it means to be white?” Their answers can be summed up as several variations of: “I don’t know, normal?” Whites don’t even notice their whiteness—they don’t tend to think of themselves as having race. It’s awkward, because we all have a race and white is one of them. It’s even more awkward when white people say things about envying culture and ethnicity, because they don’t see their own culture and ethnicity as anything other than the baseline.

 

The scientific way to train white people to stop being racist


"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in DC, 1/27/2017
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they don’t tend to think of themselves as having race. It’s awkward, because we all have a race and white is one of them.

 

Wouldn't it be great if all people thought that way - "we are all just people". In fact, I believe that is the way most people think.

 

It is only those who for some unknown reason need constant divisiveness that cannot accept it.

Honored Social Butterfly


@rk9152 wrote:

they don’t tend to think of themselves as having race. It’s awkward, because we all have a race and white is one of them.

 

Wouldn't it be great if all people thought that way - "we are all just people". In fact, I believe that is the way most people think.

 

It is only those who for some unknown reason need constant divisiveness that cannot accept it.


Once again, some choose to claim they know what others think.  Why would anyone make such a claim?  No one has posted any such thing. Too much listening to Limblah; it's exactly what Limblah does everyday.  Claims he knows what others think, and then attacks his own claims.....just what one does here everyday as well.

 

Of course most all people think, "we are all just people"....but it appears those on the "Alt-Right" don't believe this.  Everyone will note "rk" NEVER attacks their views and objectives, he chooses to attack those who point it out.

 

Views like those posted are divisive, narcissistic and irrelevant.


"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in DC, 1/27/2017
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is that an attack?

Libs are nuttier than squirrel poop
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@Centristsin2010 wrote:

What makes race so hard for white people to talk about? For many, topics of race and racism trigger intense emotional reactions for a few reasons:

 

The scientific way to train white people to stop being racist


Nice article.  The recognition of implicit biases is critical, IMO.  Something we should do daily.  

 

I'm out at the beach in Delaware right now, and I've been walking on the boardwalk in the early morning to get some exercise in.  Twice, I was asked if I was a local.   And that made me feel good, somehow, that I fit in, and was not seen as a tourist.   Subtle differences, like walking at 7 instead of lugging stuff to the beach at 8.  Coffee in hand from a local little shop and not the Starbucks on the corner.   Silly maybe, but it made me feel good.  

 

I came home and told my husband that.   And he just laughed.   He said, "sweetie, you get mistaken for a native all the time, even in Holland."  


It just struck me how 95% of the time I seamlessly blend in.   And he does not. Even if he never opens his mouth, his looks are different enough that the over 60 set here at the beach would rarely wonder if he's a native or not. 

 

It's not a big thing.  It's not like the cops are beating him up, or an establishment refuses to serve him, or someone makes a bigoted slur.   But it is a FREQUENT thing, that reinforces to me that I fit in, and he does not quite fit in.   My own implicit bias.  The implicit bias of the retirees I was hanging out with each morning.....


This doesn't happen at home, which is majority-minority.    Here, though, the beach locals are 95% white, and even the tourists are mostly white.  I think I've seen one Asian family, and maybe three black families in the past week.  

 

So then I began to wonder.....why is this?   These beaches draw from NJ, Philadelphia, DC, and Baltimore.   You'd think there would be more diversity here during tourist season.....

 

 

Honored Social Butterfly

@NM

In Florida lots of black folk are near the water... fishing. Not many locals white or black people, just sit on the beach. When I go, I'll take a fishing rod and the dogs. My boys usta surf, my wife goes to get away from stress. We never go mid day... that's for tourists.

Where I live ... the rural areas always have black folk fishing the canals, ponds and lakes. Never see Mexicans or Guatemalans fishing. They'll buy fish outside the local grocery store where the older black ladies sell their catch... mostly catfish and bream.

Then I'll go buy fish Tacos from Lupe. The cycle of life.

Libs are nuttier than squirrel poop
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@Fishslayer777 wrote:
@NM

In Florida lots of black folk are near the water... fishing. Not many locals white or black people, just sit on the beach. When I go, I'll take a fishing rod and the dogs. My boys usta surf, my wife goes to get away from stress. We never go mid day... that's for tourists.

Where I live ... the rural areas always have black folk fishing the canals, ponds and lakes. Never see Mexicans or Guatemalans fishing. They'll buy fish outside the local grocery store where the older black ladies sell their catch... mostly catfish and bream.

Then I'll go buy fish Tacos from Lupe. The cycle of life.

Dontcha just LOVE when white folks sterotype other nationalities?  At least he didn't use a hyphen.


"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in DC, 1/27/2017
Honored Social Butterfly

@ Cent

Just my observations, you know like calling balls and strikes... no stereotypes, no judgement, well except tourists, but they come in all flavors. Seems most of the mid day folks are northerners and Europeans, the vitamin D starved crowd. I included my whole family in my observations too... did I stereotype them and me? Sometimes thinking before typing helps. I didn't say anything in absolutes, it's just what I notice.

Maybe one day I'll have the divine eye that sees into another's heart.

Libs are nuttier than squirrel poop
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@NerdyMom wrote:

@Centristsin2010 wrote:

What makes race so hard for white people to talk about? For many, topics of race and racism trigger intense emotional reactions for a few reasons:

 

The scientific way to train white people to stop being racist


Nice article.  The recognition of implicit biases is critical, IMO.  Something we should do daily.  

 

I'm out at the beach in Delaware right now, and I've been walking on the boardwalk in the early morning to get some exercise in.  Twice, I was asked if I was a local.   And that made me feel good, somehow, that I fit in, and was not seen as a tourist.   Subtle differences, like walking at 7 instead of lugging stuff to the beach at 8.  Coffee in hand from a local little shop and not the Starbucks on the corner.   Silly maybe, but it made me feel good.  

 

I came home and told my husband that.   And he just laughed.   He said, "sweetie, you get mistaken for a native all the time, even in Holland."  


It just struck me how 95% of the time I seamlessly blend in.   And he does not. Even if he never opens his mouth, his looks are different enough that the over 60 set here at the beach would rarely wonder if he's a native or not. 

 

It's not a big thing.  It's not like the cops are beating him up, or an establishment refuses to serve him, or someone makes a bigoted slur.   But it is a FREQUENT thing, that reinforces to me that I fit in, and he does not quite fit in.   My own implicit bias.  The implicit bias of the retirees I was hanging out with each morning.....


This doesn't happen at home, which is majority-minority.    Here, though, the beach locals are 95% white, and even the tourists are mostly white.  I think I've seen one Asian family, and maybe three black families in the past week.  

 

So then I began to wonder.....why is this?   These beaches draw from NJ, Philadelphia, DC, and Baltimore.   You'd think there would be more diversity here during tourist season.....

 

Interesting observation, NerdyMom.  I lived in Va Beach for several years while attending college in Norfolk, VA.  The Tidewater area has a fairly large black population, but rarely would one see a black on the beach.  Here's an interesting perspective:

 

Swimming in the Black Community: How Racism Is Drowning Us

 

Summertime is here, which means that pool parties and beach days are bound to be had. However, while many of us may be sporting a two-piece on the sand, very few of us will be jumping off a diving board anytime soon. Why? Because, according to research from the USA Swimming Foundation and the University of Memphis, 70 percent of African Americans do not know how to swim.

 

So what’s to blame for this alarming statistic? Of course there is the obvious issue of chlorine and the effects it has on our hair; but the true origin of our underrepresentation in the water is attached to deeper historical and generational roots—historically, segregation; generationally, fear.

 

As University of Montana professor Jeff Wiltse, author of Contested Waters: A Social History of Swimming Pools in America, puts it, “It is because of discrimination and segregation that swimming never became a part of African-American recreational culture.”

 

Put differently: Lack of access to swimming pools and public beaches meant that many black Americans were denied the opportunity to learn how to swim; and intergenerational fear of the water stops their descendants from learning now.

 

In fact, recreational swimming only became popular in the U.S. during the 1920s and 1930s. It was then that many municipal pools began to pop up across the nation. By the time swimming became recognized as a sport in the 1950s and 1960s, segregation in the U.S. was also recognized, widening the racial and economic divide that left many African Americans to drown—literally and figuratively.

 

This leads us to today’s reality: If your grandparents weren’t able to learn how to swim, then they didn’t teach your parents. And if your parents didn’t swim, then you might not know how to swim, either.

 

In fact, the USA Swimming Foundation study shows that “if a parent does not know how to swim, there is only a 13 percent chance that a child in that household will learn how to swim.”

 

“My mother didn't know how to swim and had a bit of a fear of the water. That fear was pushed on us, so we didn't learn how to swim,” says Ty Alexander, author of Things I Wish I Knew Before My Mom Died. On the other hand, “My son knows the basics just because he's a millennial … they are more daring and willing to jump in the water without fear,” she adds.

 

Then there is the opposite: black parents who did know how to swim. Parents like former University of Texas at Austin competitive swimmer Kelley Robins Hicks. “I never remember learning to swim … as far as I know, I’ve been able to swim my whole life,” she says. Her parents both swam in high school, and her father also swam in college. “All of my cousins, aunts and uncles swim, too,” she adds.

 

This “family business,” as Robins Hicks puts it, ultimately afforded many other black children in Houston the opportunity not only to swim but to swim competitively during the late ’80s. Her father teamed up with both her godfather and the city’s commissioner to create a swim team for inner-city kids that would be free.

 

A major inclusion, since, despite its racially divided beginnings, swimming was and still is an expensive sport.

 

Despite both historical and current impediments, many young black people love being around water. And to circumvent the constraints of a racist society—from segregation to affordability and accessibility—some black parents took their children swimming in local lakes, rivers or oceans. The negative side to this is the danger that these bodies of water can present.

 

more at:  Swimming in the Black Community: How Racism Is Drowning Us


"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in DC, 1/27/2017
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Another aspect is that there are some who get enmeshed in "white guilt" and try to find a way to personally "make emends" for his past sins.

 

Then there are those who see themselves as superior to society as a whole and try to correct the "errors of others". They feel that they must use the power of the government to adjust the thinking of those lesser citizens who have not gotten into the "white guilt" mindset.

 

Then, getting back to the basics of the topic, there is the definition issue. For example, there are some who believe that there are citizens who because of their race are unable to see to their own needs and anyone who sees all races as just "people" are racists. To me, that thinking is racist but, as I said "there is the definition issue".

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@rk9152 wrote:

Another aspect is that there are some who get enmeshed in "white guilt" and try to find a way to personally "make emends" for his past sins.

 

Then there are those who see themselves as superior to society as a whole and try to correct the "errors of others". They feel that they must use the power of the government to adjust the thinking of those lesser citizens who have not gotten into the "white guilt" mindset.

 

Then, getting back to the basics of the topic, there is the definition issue. For example, there are some who believe that there are citizens who because of their race are unable to see to their own needs and anyone who sees all races as just "people" are racists. To me, that thinking is racist but, as I said "there is the definition issue".


Have you read what is contained in the following link in it's entirety? (my bet is no)

 

The scientific way to train white people to stop being racist


Man learns from history that man learns nothing from history.
Honored Social Butterfly


@rk9152 wrote:

Another aspect is that there are some who get enmeshed in "white guilt" and try to find a way to personally "make emends" for his past sins.

 

Then there are those who see themselves as superior to society as a whole and try to correct the "errors of others". They feel that they must use the power of the government to adjust the thinking of those lesser citizens who have not gotten into the "white guilt" mindset.

 

Then, getting back to the basics of the topic, there is the definition issue. For example, there are some who believe that there are citizens who because of their race are unable to see to their own needs and anyone who sees all races as just "people" are racists. To me, that thinking is racist but, as I said "there is the definition issue".


Did you read what's contained in this link in it's entirey?   The scientific way to train white people to stop being racist


Man learns from history that man learns nothing from history.
Honored Social Butterfly


@rk9152 wrote:

Another aspect is that there are some who get enmeshed in "white guilt" and try to find a way to personally "make emends" for his past sins.

 

Then there are those who see themselves as superior to society as a whole and try to correct the "errors of others". They feel that they must use the power of the government to adjust the thinking of those lesser citizens who have not gotten into the "white guilt" mindset.

 

Then, getting back to the basics of the topic, there is the definition issue. For example, there are some who believe that there are citizens who because of their race are unable to see to their own needs and anyone who sees all races as just "people" are racists. To me, that thinking is racist but, as I said "there is the definition issue".


It's for real folks - it's been researched and certified by the Law School of Trump University at Bowling Green.

 

44>dolt45
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@alferdpacker wrote:

@rk9152 wrote:

Another aspect is that there are some who get enmeshed in "white guilt" and try to find a way to personally "make emends" for his past sins.

 

Then there are those who see themselves as superior to society as a whole and try to correct the "errors of others". They feel that they must use the power of the government to adjust the thinking of those lesser citizens who have not gotten into the "white guilt" mindset.

 

Then, getting back to the basics of the topic, there is the definition issue. For example, there are some who believe that there are citizens who because of their race are unable to see to their own needs and anyone who sees all races as just "people" are racists. To me, that thinking is racist but, as I said "there is the definition issue".


It's for real folks - it's been researched and certified by the Law School of Trump University at Bowling Green.

 


Trump University in Bowling Green:

 

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Man learns from history that man learns nothing from history.
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@alferdpacker wrote:

@rk9152 wrote:

Another aspect is that there are some who get enmeshed in "white guilt" and try to find a way to personally "make emends" for his past sins.

 

Then there are those who see themselves as superior to society as a whole and try to correct the "errors of others". They feel that they must use the power of the government to adjust the thinking of those lesser citizens who have not gotten into the "white guilt" mindset.

 

Then, getting back to the basics of the topic, there is the definition issue. For example, there are some who believe that there are citizens who because of their race are unable to see to their own needs and anyone who sees all races as just "people" are racists. To me, that thinking is racist but, as I said "there is the definition issue".


It's for real folks - it's been researched and certified by the Law School of Trump University at Bowling Green.

 


Does that mean that you agree with what I posted - or disagree with what I posted - or don't care what I posted but just had to type something??

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@TxGrandpa2 wrote:

@Centristsin2010 wrote:



You are the one with a major in psychology, you tell me.   You made the comment, I didn't.  What "racial diferences" are YOU talking about?  All I have is a background of interacting with people of different culturals, races, etc..  Great!  What "racial differences" did you observe?  Again, you raised the point. 

 

"Really?"  What would the frequent use of that expression indicate?  Disbelief.  Thanks for asking....


I was replying to your post.  You still haven't replied.  What "racial differences are you talking about?  Not answering indicates you don't know and just threw that into the discussion for unknown reasons.  Maybe just to be divisive....  But if you don't know what your posting, how can anyone else? 

 

Racism isn't partisan? You said it was. You tell us.....  Can you explain why Confederate statues wasn't a problem during the Obama administration, but during others it is? You mean it was an issue during the Bush Jr. Administration and Clinton Admin as well.  I don't remeber those.....help us out.

 

Can you explain why racism wasn't a topic of national discussion during the Obama administration, but now it is?  Sure.  When Obama was in office, he didn't stoke the flames of racism; didn't make racist comments during his campaign and didn't align with the KKK, White Nationalists/Alt-Right.  All things that are happening now.  Obama didn't embolden and support hate groups and encourage violence like the current President has. 

 

But during the Obama administration there were several racial situations from Trevon Martin, Michael Brown and their respective communities; more cell phone video of cops using excessive force, Dylan Roof.  I could go on but it's unnecessary.  One was a positive influence and your guy, trump is a pig and has a negative impact on almost everything he touches.

 

So your premise is wrong....racism was a topic during the Obama Administration, it was mostly positive.  With trump, it isn't.


"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in DC, 1/27/2017
Honored Social Butterfly


@Centristsin2010 wrote:

 

Can you explain why racism wasn't a topic of national discussion during the Obama administration, but now it is?  Sure.  When Obama was in office, he didn't stoke the flames of racism; didn't make racist comments during his campaign and didn't align with the KKK, White Nationalists/Alt-Right.  All things that are happening now.  Obama didn't embolden and support hate groups and encourage violence like the current President has. 

 

But during the Obama administration there were several racial situations from Trevon Martin, Michael Brown and their respective communities; more cell phone video of cops using excessive force, Dylan Roof.  I could go on but it's unnecessary.  One was a positive influence and your guy, trump is a pig and has a negative impact on almost everything he touches.

 

So your premise is wrong....racism was a topic during the Obama Administration, it was mostly positive.  With trump, it isn't.



I'm sure that during the decades long that those statues have been standing, through the civil rights movement, etc, that they didn't suddenly become an evil racist influence on the nation.  I don't recall them being blamed for civil rights strife during the protests and demonstrations of the early 1960s. 

 

And you still glossed over why there wasn't all this call to take the statues down during Obama's administration.  Instead you brought up about some Black incidents. 

 

I have to wonder if Obama didn't encourage bias by his reaction to a purely local matter with the Henry Louis Gates incident when he interfered on behalf of a personal friend based on a local non-racial matter?  Without doubt the usual here will alibi that also.  

 

You claim racism was positive during the Obama administration, but also brought up incidents that says otherwise.  No, Obama fostered racism more than attempting to bring the nation together; he did more to divide the country than any president before and now we're reaping the results. 

 

Your posts are mostly filled up with <wink, wink> words....

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@TxGrandpa2 wrote:

 

You claim racism was positive during the Obama administration, but also brought up incidents that says otherwise.  No, Obama fostered racism more than attempting to bring the nation together; he did more to divide the country than any president before and now we're reaping the results. 

 


Can you please show documentation of some kind as to how Obama did this? I sure won't be holding my breath ! Just more empty words.


Man learns from history that man learns nothing from history.
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