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Honored Social Butterfly

Why are people still racist?

Why are people still racist? What science says about America’s race problem.

 

Torch-bearing white supremacists shouting racist and anti-Semitic slogans. Protesters and counter protesters colliding with violence and chaos. A car driven by a known Nazi sympathizer mowing down a crowd of activists.

 

Many Americans responded to this weekend's violence in Charlottesville with disbelieving horror. How could this happen in America, in 2017? “This is not who we are,” said Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine (D).

 

And yet, this is who we are.

 

Amid our modern clashes, researchers in psychology, sociology and neurology have been studying the roots of racism. We draw on that research and asked two scientists to explain why people feel and act this way toward each other.

 

What causes people to be racist?

 

“In some ways, it’s super simple. People learn to be whatever their society and culture teaches them. We often assume that it takes parents actively teaching their kids, for them to be racist. The truth is that unless parents actively teach kids not to be racists, they will be,” said Jennifer Richeson, a Yale University social psychologist. “This is not the product of some deep-seated, evil heart that is cultivated. It comes from the environment, the air all around us.”

 

Richeson compares children's instinctive formation of biases to a student at a new school. “When you arrive at a new high school. You are instinctively trying to figure out who’s cool, who’s not, who’s a nerd, who gets beat up? Kids quickly acquire these associations,” she said.

 

To get a sense of just how pervasive and imperceptibly our environment can affect us, one study at Tufts University found that even with a TV show on mute displaying scenes with no explicit discrimination, the nonverbal body language of black and white actors interacting was enough to cause watchers to test higher for implicit bias afterward.

 

“An us-them mentality is unfortunately a really basic part of our biology,” said Eric Knowles, a psychology professor at New York University who studies prejudice and politics. “There’s a lot of evidence that people have an ingrained even evolved tendency toward people who are in our so-called 'in group.'”

 

But how we define those groups, and the tendency to draw divisions along racial lines, is social, not biological, he added. “We can draw those lines in a number of ways that society tells us,” he said. 

 

When does racism drive people to commit violence?

 

“The most likely predictor of that is exposure to a kind of ideology,” Knowles said. Most if not all people carry implicit biases and unexamined prejudices, he said, and some may harbor feelings of fear or resentment that they don’t express in public.

 

More at:   Why are people still racist? What science says about America’s race problem.

 

 


"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in DC, 1/27/2017
Honored Social Butterfly


@rk9152 wrote:

@Roxanna35 wrote:

@rk9152 wrote:

As with many topics, it all depends on the definition applied. For example, back in the old days, assigning a student to a school based on his race was - racism. After desegregation assigning a student to a school based on his race was - bussing.

 

Not giving a person a promotion due to her gender was  - sexism. Giving a person a promotion because of her gender was - upward mobility.


So,, what is it that you are trying to say?


So,, what I am trying to say is - "As with many topics, it all depends on the definition applied. For example, back in the old days, assigning a student to a school based on his race was - racism. After desegregation assigning a student to a school based on his race was - bussing.

 

Not giving a person a promotion due to her gender was  - sexism. Giving a person a promotion because of her gender was - upward mobility.

 

You are familiar with the word, "definition" are you not?


I never had that problem. I just plain ol scored that much better on the tests.

So it begins.
Honored Social Butterfly


@Roxanna35 wrote:

@rk9152 wrote:

As with many topics, it all depends on the definition applied. For example, back in the old days, assigning a student to a school based on his race was - racism. After desegregation assigning a student to a school based on his race was - bussing.

 

Not giving a person a promotion due to her gender was  - sexism. Giving a person a promotion because of her gender was - upward mobility.


So,, what is it that you are trying to say?


That he STILL has absolutely no idea what the word racism means.


"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in DC, 1/27/2017
Honored Social Butterfly


@Centristsin2010 wrote:

@Roxanna35 wrote:

@rk9152 wrote:

As with many topics, it all depends on the definition applied. For example, back in the old days, assigning a student to a school based on his race was - racism. After desegregation assigning a student to a school based on his race was - bussing.

 

Not giving a person a promotion due to her gender was  - sexism. Giving a person a promotion because of her gender was - upward mobility.


So,, what is it that you are trying to say?


That he STILL has absolutely no idea what the word racism means.


O.K. - racism is not assigning people to schools, jobs, etc. based on race. What is it??

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Honored Social Butterfly


@rk9152 wrote:

@Centristsin2010 wrote:

@Roxanna35 wrote:

@rk9152 wrote:

As with many topics, it all depends on the definition applied. For example, back in the old days, assigning a student to a school based on his race was - racism. After desegregation assigning a student to a school based on his race was - bussing.

 

Not giving a person a promotion due to her gender was  - sexism. Giving a person a promotion because of her gender was - upward mobility.


So,, what is it that you are trying to say?


That he STILL has absolutely no idea what the word racism means.


O.K. - racism is not assigning people to schools, jobs, etc. based on race.

 

No, it isn't.

 

What is it?

 

Why don't you look up the word in a dictionary, post the actual definition here and explain how your example applies to the definition.  I'm confident this exercise will help you to understand the definition vs. your having it spoon-fed to you again.  "Teach a man to phish....."

 

But thanks for asking.....


 

 


"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in DC, 1/27/2017
Honored Social Butterfly

I see the left is still beating the "racism" drum to solicit more hate.

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@NOTHAPPENING wrote:

I see the left is still beating the "racism" drum to solicit more hate.


Once again you got it wrong, Not.  Some are discussing racism; something most adults should be able to do without "hating".  Sorry you seem incapable of participating in that discussion.


"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in DC, 1/27/2017
Honored Social Butterfly


@NOTHAPPENING wrote:

I see the left is still beating the "racism" drum to solicit more hate.


thank God kluxxers and Nazis dont raise their kids to be racist. we can rule out hate mongers as part of the problem, because they are on the guiltless right.

 

So it begins.
Honored Social Butterfly


@MIseker wrote:

@NOTHAPPENING wrote:

I see the left is still beating the "racism" drum to solicit more hate.


thank God kluxxers and Nazis dont raise their kids to be racist. we can rule out hate mongers as part of the problem, because they are on the guiltless right.

 


We need the radical left to agitate the population since the general population doesn't have enough problems.

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@NOTHAPPENING wrote:

@MIseker wrote:

@NOTHAPPENING wrote:

I see the left is still beating the "racism" drum to solicit more hate.


thank God kluxxers and Nazis dont raise their kids to be racist. we can rule out hate mongers as part of the problem, because they are on the guiltless right.

 


We need the radical left to agitate the population since the general population doesn't have enough problems.


What the far-right wing extremists don't seem to understand is that it's their Nazi's, KKK, Alt-Right that's "agitating the population".  What frauds.


"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in DC, 1/27/2017
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@Centristsin2010 wrote:

@NOTHAPPENING wrote:

@MIseker wrote:

@NOTHAPPENING wrote:

I see the left is still beating the "racism" drum to solicit more hate.


thank God kluxxers and Nazis dont raise their kids to be racist. we can rule out hate mongers as part of the problem, because they are on the guiltless right.

 


We need the radical left to agitate the population since the general population doesn't have enough problems.


What the far-right wing extremists don't seem to understand is that it's their Nazi's, KKK, Alt-Right that's "agitating the population".  What frauds.


The "far right" and the "far left" are just nut cases.  Do you or anyone else think you have the ability to change insanity?  Riling nut cases up doesn't seem to work to me and rational people start to wonder about the people drumming up the hatred.

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@NOTHAPPENING wrote:

@MIseker wrote:

@NOTHAPPENING wrote:

I see the left is still beating the "racism" drum to solicit more hate.


thank God kluxxers and Nazis dont raise their kids to be racist. we can rule out hate mongers as part of the problem, because they are on the guiltless right.

 


We need the radical left to agitate the population since the general population doesn't have enough problems.


As long as you see this as a left right issue, and not something that permeates all phases of our society, and understand how it was promoted here in the begining of the US and still is in the SAME FASHION, understand how the government works to keep a segemt of out society  down and divided ( the poor and working class) I dont think you will have a grasp on rascism. you have to understand SOCIETY made us all rascists in some way, to overcome that battle within yourself.

So it begins.
Honored Social Butterfly

I strongly recommend reading Ta-Nehisi Coates' book, Between the World and Me.     "Race is the child of racism.  Not the father."    The audible book is great.  He narrates it, and it's only about 3 hours long. 

 

https://www.audible.com/pd/Bios-Memoirs/Between-the-World-and-Me-Audiobook/B010N1IC5A/ref=a_search_c...

 

We created racial constructs to gain and maintain power/wealth.  Period.   We have created a system that requires black people to be twice as good as white people to even have a shot at something.   We do that on purpose, to preserve our power and our wealth.   We keep an underclass labor force that makes us wealthier.  If we lose that underclass labor force, not only do we have to do the work ourselves, but we lose wealth opportunities, AND we have increased competition.  

 

When you are born and raised in that type of system, it's hard not to let the millions of subtle, nuanced concepts settle in your brain.   Don't date a black person.  Don't let them buy your house/live in the same neighborhood.  Don't let them in your schools.  Don't walk past them or share an elevator with them. They only got that job because of affirmative action.  They must commit more crimes because they get arrested more often.  If they wear their pants on the ground, they are thugs.  And a million more.

 

As Coates says, blacks will only truly be equal when they can be as mediocre as whites.

 

Look at our last two presidents.   A black man who's a Harvard Law School graduate.   He has one wife, children only by that one wife.   Has never filed bankruptcy.  Has never admitted to sexual assault.   Has never admitted to adultery.     

 

Trump, on the other hand, has cheated on all three wives, has babies with all of them, has filed bankruptcy at least 3 times, if not up to 6, depending on how you classify his business entities, and has bragged about grabbing ***** because he can.  

 

The black man is more than twice as good as the mediocre white man who followed him.  

 

As long as we hold onto that need for an artificial advantage, a privilege, we will never erase the millions of nuanced racist messages that pervade our culture.  

Honored Social Butterfly


@NerdyMom wrote:

I strongly recommend reading Ta-Nehisi Coates' book, Between the World and Me.     "Race is the child of racism.  Not the father."    The audible book is great.  He narrates it, and it's only about 3 hours long. 

 

https://www.audible.com/pd/Bios-Memoirs/Between-the-World-and-Me-Audiobook/B010N1IC5A/ref=a_search_c...

 

We created racial constructs to gain and maintain power/wealth.  Period.   We have created a system that requires black people to be twice as good as white people to even have a shot at something.   We do that on purpose, to preserve our power and our wealth.   We keep an underclass labor force that makes us wealthier.  If we lose that underclass labor force, not only do we have to do the work ourselves, but we lose wealth opportunities, AND we have increased competition.  

 

When you are born and raised in that type of system, it's hard not to let the millions of subtle, nuanced concepts settle in your brain.   Don't date a black person.  Don't let them buy your house/live in the same neighborhood.  Don't let them in your schools.  Don't walk past them or share an elevator with them. They only got that job because of affirmative action.  They must commit more crimes because they get arrested more often.  If they wear their pants on the ground, they are thugs.  And a million more.

 

As Coates says, blacks will only truly be equal when they can be as mediocre as whites.

 

Look at our last two presidents.   A black man who's a Harvard Law School graduate.   He has one wife, children only by that one wife.   Has never filed bankruptcy.  Has never admitted to sexual assault.   Has never admitted to adultery.     

 

Trump, on the other hand, has cheated on all three wives, has babies with all of them, has filed bankruptcy at least 3 times, if not up to 6, depending on how you classify his business entities, and has bragged about grabbing ***** because he can.  

 

The black man is more than twice as good as the mediocre white man who followed him.  

 

As long as we hold onto that need for an artificial advantage, a privilege, we will never erase the millions of nuanced racist messages that pervade our culture.  


Excellent post. Author and Historian Howard Zinn examines these constructs, in places word for word, and goes back to the beginnings of racism in the US. Of course it was againt the red man first and foremost, but in the very beginning on the coast of the US ( 1600's) we had endentured servants that were treated as slaves, and also a handfull of white slaves. What happened is society was built along a class system instead of a racial one, with escapees of all colors banding together, and also banding together in uprisings. The ruling class, along with the christian church, had to do something to break the solidarity of that huge underclass, so pamphlets were distribted, Blacks began to be treated much worse than whites, and hate and division was sown.. and here we are with that legacy.

 

I do recomend Zinn's history of the US books. its history from the po folks view. His books are banned in a lot of places because of the questions they raise, but the history he puts forth is documented and true. Current rulers of course, cant stand the ciizens knowing the truth.

 

 

So it begins.
Honored Social Butterfly


@NerdyMom wrote:

I strongly recommend reading Ta-Nehisi Coates' book, Between the World and Me.     "Race is the child of racism.  Not the father."    The audible book is great.  He narrates it, and it's only about 3 hours long. 

 

https://www.audible.com/pd/Bios-Memoirs/Between-the-World-and-Me-Audiobook/B010N1IC5A/ref=a_search_c...

 

We created racial constructs to gain and maintain power/wealth.  Period.   We have created a system that requires black people to be twice as good as white people to even have a shot at something.   We do that on purpose, to preserve our power and our wealth.   We keep an underclass labor force that makes us wealthier.  If we lose that underclass labor force, not only do we have to do the work ourselves, but we lose wealth opportunities, AND we have increased competition.  

 

When you are born and raised in that type of system, it's hard not to let the millions of subtle, nuanced concepts settle in your brain.   Don't date a black person.  Don't let them buy your house/live in the same neighborhood.  Don't let them in your schools.  Don't walk past them or share an elevator with them. They only got that job because of affirmative action.  They must commit more crimes because they get arrested more often.  If they wear their pants on the ground, they are thugs.  And a million more.

 

As Coates says, blacks will only truly be equal when they can be as mediocre as whites.

 

Look at our last two presidents.   A black man who's a Harvard Law School graduate.   He has one wife, children only by that one wife.   Has never filed bankruptcy.  Has never admitted to sexual assault.   Has never admitted to adultery.     

 

Trump, on the other hand, has cheated on all three wives, has babies with all of them, has filed bankruptcy at least 3 times, if not up to 6, depending on how you classify his business entities, and has bragllentged about grabbing ***** because he can.  

 

The black man is more than twice as good as the mediocre white man who followed him.  

 

As long as we hold onto that need for an artificial advantage, a privilege, we will never erase the millions of nuanced racist messages that pervade our culture.  


Excellent post, NerdyMom!


"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in DC, 1/27/2017
Esteemed Social Butterfly

Start talking about race might as well bring this to the forefront.

 

https://www.splcenter.org/hatewatch/2017/08/12/flags-and-other-symbols-used-far-right-groups-charlot...

 

How is to identify who might desire to wound you coming to a town or city state near you soon.

 

Those are the wondrous and lovely group tags, who collectively made up the Alt Right groups in Charlottesville over the weekend.

 

With the interesting peaceful and loving message of join us or die!

 

If your not 100% pure European descent you don't deserve to live. Yeah, good people on both sides were injured or died in Charlottesville.

 

I want to use expletives

 

frozen

 

just not enough.

 

And yes, after long days/nights, I'd still like to swing these hunks of glass , plastic and silicon against the nearest wall Come on retirement!
Honored Social Butterfly


@Frozenoem wrote:

 

 

If your not 100% pure European descent you don't deserve to live. Yeah, good people on both sides were injured or died in Charlottesville.

 

I want to use expletives

 

frozen

 

just not enough.

 

So close but no cigar.   look at me. I am first generation Cuban, both my parents are Spaniards, the last I looked thay are considered European caucasian,  and yet, in the US.  I am a minority. And there are  many that don't think that I am white.just because I am Cuban.
Any explanation of that?

 


 

no name
Esteemed Social Butterfly

Rk, 

 

I'll be first to admit I don't understand the White Nationalist reasoning, My aunt would probably be in your boat. Her husband before my uncle was a cop under Batista, around the 40's. Yes by birth she was Cuban and hooked me on Cuban Coffee at early age.

 

Best friend for only 45 years also is first generation Cuban living in Boston. And yes, he'd much rather live where it's warmer.

 

I have to admit I wouldn't mind someday seeing Aunts Cuba, would be an improvement over pictures only. 

 

Froze

And yes, after long days/nights, I'd still like to swing these hunks of glass , plastic and silicon against the nearest wall Come on retirement!
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@Roxanna35 wrote:

 

So close but no cigar.   look at me. I am first generation Cuban, both my parents are Spaniards, the last I looked thay are considered European caucasian,  and yet, in the US.  I am a minority. And there are  many that don't think that I am white.just because I am Cuban.
Any explanation of that?

 


 


The Census and even economic and other type reports break down Hispanics in racial categories - specifying "non-white" Hispanic.

 

You should read this for a real laugh and as an example of how stupid all this is -

NPR Code Switch 06/16/2014 - On The Census, Who Checks "Hispanic", Who Checks "White", and Why

 

Gee wouldn't it be great if it just said "American". - citizen yes/no

 

Esteemed Social Butterfly

Not a scientific study but, for some its the way they're raised, family and friends.

 

Others just remain segregated through school and life, never meeting anyone different and certainly never breaking bread with another family.

 

Perhaps combination of friends, family, school and a minor in religion. As I recall differences between some neighbors/friends growing up to now.

 

Pretty much knew some would remain racist and others would explore beyond average thinking.

 

Froze

And yes, after long days/nights, I'd still like to swing these hunks of glass , plastic and silicon against the nearest wall Come on retirement!
Honored Social Butterfly

It is quite interesting that people still ask as to why there is so much racism in the US

I will say, that it is in the DNA of American culture.

You all know that I wasn't born here. that I come from a country that probably had the first slaves that came to this continent. and yet. racism has not existed there. Why?

simple, racial integration was always there and not shunned. Racial mixture always existed and it was never illegal.
We always recognize people from the black race as Cubans and never as African Cubans. If you go far into the American Continent, you see that the countries that were  colonized by the Spaniards or the French actually never encountered the racism that you have here. 
Racial mixture has always been and never given another thoughtn. Blacks, whithes, American Indians. always together always as one.
This country was founded by the British. and we all know how the British treated their colonies. and the separation that they always had in all their colonies. so, besides being taught, it is also in the culture 
Slavery existed here just like in many other places in this continent, but see the differences in how it has evolved.

no name
Honored Social Butterfly


@Roxanna35 wrote:

It is quite interesting that people still ask as to why there is so much racism in the US

I will say, that it is in the DNA of American culture.

You all know that I wasn't born here. that I come from a country that probably had the first slaves that came to this continent. and yet. racism has not existed there. Why?

simple, racial integration was always there and not shunned. Racial mixture always existed and it was never illegal.
We always recognize people from the black race as Cubans and never as African Cubans. If you go far into the American Continent, you see that the countries that were  colonized by the Spaniards or the French actually never encountered the racism that you have here. 
Racial mixture has always been and never given another thoughtn. Blacks, whithes, American Indians. always together always as one.
This country was founded by the British. and we all know how the British treated their colonies. and the separation that they always had in all their colonies. so, besides being taught, it is also in the culture 
Slavery existed here just like in many other places in this continent, but see the differences in how it has evolved.


Really ? ! ?  This 2013 (Opinion) article says otherwise.  Are they wrong?

NYT 03/23/2013 (Opinion) - For Blacks in Cuba, the Revolution Hasn’t Begun

 

A highlight:  more at the link ~ 

 

  • CHANGE is the latest news to come out of Cuba, though for Afro-Cubans like myself, this is more dream than reality. . . . . And the reality is that in Cuba, your experience of these changes depends on your skin color.
  • The private sector in Cuba now enjoys a certain degree of economic liberation, but blacks are not well positioned to take advantage of it. We inherited more than three centuries of slavery during the Spanish colonial era. Racial exclusion continued after Cuba became independent in 1902, and a half century of revolution since 1959 has been unable to overcome it.
  • It’s true that Cubans still have a strong safety net: most do not pay rent, and education and health care are free. But the economic divergence created two contrasting realities that persist today. The first is that of white Cubans, who have leveraged their resources to enter the new market-driven economy and reap the benefits of a supposedly more open socialism. The other reality is that of the black plurality, which witnessed the demise of the socialist utopia from the island’s least comfortable quarters.
  • Black Cubans have less property and money, and also have to contend with pervasive racism. Not long ago it was common for hotel managers, for example, to hire only white staff members, so as not to offend the supposed sensibilities of their European clientele.  That type of blatant racism has become less socially acceptable, but blacks are still woefully underrepresented in tourism — probably the economy’s most lucrative sector — and are far less likely than whites to own their own businesses -
  • Racism in Cuba has been concealed and reinforced in part because it isn’t talked about. The government hasn’t allowed racial prejudice to be debated or confronted politically or culturally, often pretending instead as though it didn’t exist. Before 1990, black Cubans suffered a paralysis of economic mobility while, paradoxically, the government decreed the end of racism in speeches and publications. To question the extent of racial progress was tantamount to a counterrevolutionary act. This made it almost impossible to point out the obvious: racism is alive and well.
  • It’s true that the 1980s produced a generation of black professionals, like doctors and teachers, but these gains were diminished in the 1990s as blacks were excluded from lucrative sectors like hospitality. Now in the 21st century, it has become all too apparent that the black population is underrepresented at universities and in spheres of economic and political power, and overrepresented in the underground economy, in the criminal sphere and in marginal neighborhoods.

 

Sounds exactly like what NerdyMom posted in her Ta-Nehisi Coates' book, Between the World and Me recommendation.     NerdyMom said . . . . .  We created racial constructs to gain and maintain power/wealth. . . . . .   We keep an underclass labor force that makes us wealthier.  If we lose that underclass labor force, not only do we have to do the work ourselves, but we lose wealth opportunities, AND we have increased competition.  

 

Doesn't this sound like what the author of the NYT opinion article is saying.  Maybe it is just easier to hide in Cuba.

 

 

Honored Social Butterfly


@GailL1 wrote:

@Roxanna35 wrote:

It is quite interesting that people still ask as to why there is so much racism in the US

I will say, that it is in the DNA of American culture.

You all know that I wasn't born here. that I come from a country that probably had the first slaves that came to this continent. and yet. racism has not existed there. Why?

simple, racial integration was always there and not shunned. Racial mixture always existed and it was never illegal.
We always recognize people from the black race as Cubans and never as African Cubans. If you go far into the American Continent, you see that the countries that were  colonized by the Spaniards or the French actually never encountered the racism that you have here. 
Racial mixture has always been and never given another thoughtn. Blacks, whithes, American Indians. always together always as one.
This country was founded by the British. and we all know how the British treated their colonies. and the separation that they always had in all their colonies. so, besides being taught, it is also in the culture 
Slavery existed here just like in many other places in this continent, but see the differences in how it has evolved.


Really ? ! ?  This 2013 (Opinion) article says otherwise.  Are they wrong?

NYT 03/23/2013 (Opinion) - For Blacks in Cuba, the Revolution Hasn’t Begun

 

A highlight:  more at the link ~ 

 

  • CHANGE is the latest news to come out of Cuba, though for Afro-Cubans like myself, this is more dream than reality. . . . . And the reality is that in Cuba, your experience of these changes depends on your skin color.
  • The private sector in Cuba now enjoys a certain degree of economic liberation, but blacks are not well positioned to take advantage of it. We inherited more than three centuries of slavery during the Spanish colonial era. Racial exclusion continued after Cuba became independent in 1902, and a half century of revolution since 1959 has been unable to overcome it.
  • It’s true that Cubans still have a strong safety net: most do not pay rent, and education and health care are free. But the economic divergence created two contrasting realities that persist today. The first is that of white Cubans, who have leveraged their resources to enter the new market-driven economy and reap the benefits of a supposedly more open socialism. The other reality is that of the black plurality, which witnessed the demise of the socialist utopia from the island’s least comfortable quarters.
  • Black Cubans have less property and money, and also have to contend with pervasive racism. Not long ago it was common for hotel managers, for example, to hire only white staff members, so as not to offend the supposed sensibilities of their European clientele.  That type of blatant racism has become less socially acceptable, but blacks are still woefully underrepresented in tourism — probably the economy’s most lucrative sector — and are far less likely than whites to own their own businesses -
  • Racism in Cuba has been concealed and reinforced in part because it isn’t talked about. The government hasn’t allowed racial prejudice to be debated or confronted politically or culturally, often pretending instead as though it didn’t exist. Before 1990, black Cubans suffered a paralysis of economic mobility while, paradoxically, the government decreed the end of racism in speeches and publications. To question the extent of racial progress was tantamount to a counterrevolutionary act. This made it almost impossible to point out the obvious: racism is alive and well.
  • It’s true that the 1980s produced a generation of black professionals, like doctors and teachers, but these gains were diminished in the 1990s as blacks were excluded from lucrative sectors like hospitality. Now in the 21st century, it has become all too apparent that the black population is underrepresented at universities and in spheres of economic and political power, and overrepresented in the underground economy, in the criminal sphere and in marginal neighborhoods.

 

Sounds exactly like what NerdyMom posted in her Ta-Nehisi Coates' book, Between the World and Me recommendation.     NerdyMom said . . . . .  We created racial constructs to gain and maintain power/wealth. . . . . .   We keep an underclass labor force that makes us wealthier.  If we lose that underclass labor force, not only do we have to do the work ourselves, but we lose wealth opportunities, AND we have increased competition.  

 

Doesn't this sound like what the author of the NYT opinion article is saying.  Maybe it is just easier to hide in Cuba.

 

 


Gail  are you paying attention to the opinion of an Americanized Cuban?  LOL  LOL  LOL  LOL>

Really, this Americanzed Cuban is forgotten that more than the half of the popultation of Cubans are MULATOS  do you know what the means,  ?    I do believe that this  Americanized Cuban  should take a good look at his neighbors in Calle 8 in Miami, and then complain about African Cubans and how many he can find.
He obviously didn't live in Cuba long enough to have learn how the Cuban culture developed. His words I suggest, that you speak to Cubans and they will really tell you  about our culture and how we saw our whites, blacks and mulatos in our country. 

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Celia_Cruz

https://www.biography.com/people/celia-cruz-40369

 

Gail please research this woman. not anyhwere in the Internatet she is referred ever as an African Cuban.

See how the world saw her. She has been called the Queen of Salsa. and is known as an Cuban American singer. she became in 1966 an American citizen.

See in the Internet who dares call her a black woman or an African Cuban. but as a Cuban.
See more of the cuban culture. 

I just found this sort of message board. please read what Cubans write about racism
http://www.miamiherald.com/news/nation-world/world/americas/cuba/article144832109.html

 

 

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rker321

 

He was in Cuba when the OP-Ed was published - translated from Spanish.

The piece was controversial in Cuba, according to the NYT, a few weeks later this happened.

 

NYT 04/ 06 / 2013 - Writer of Times Op-Ed on Racism in Cuba Loses Job

 

But perhaps you are right - faked Op-Eds can also occur.

So No racism in Cuba ?   

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@GailL1 wrote:

rker321

 

He was in Cuba when the OP-Ed was published - translated from Spanish.

The piece was controversial in Cuba, according to the NYT, a few weeks later this happened.

 

NYT 04/ 06 / 2013 - Writer of Times Op-Ed on Racism in Cuba Loses Job

 

But perhaps you are right - faked Op-Eds can also occur.

So No racism in Cuba ?   


Gail, I took part of the first census after the Cuban revolution, and the numbers that you saw in that article are pretty much the numbers that I remember.

I don't know what  is the problem with that young man  happens to be. But, I would as a Cuban remind him that today 2017 the amount of racial mixture in Cuba is too great, that in probablity the mixed race Cubans represent  the majoirity in the country
about a year a go. a great Cuban singer passed.  Celia Cruz. ask him if anyone said or even thought of that woman as an African Cuban?
Again, racial mixture in Cuba has always been quite prevalent. so are those of mixed race now going to attack whom?  the blacks or the whites? Who are they going to stand with?
Gail any Cuban that refers to any other Cuban by their race is a racist.
I never saw that in my country of Birth, The Cuban Community in Miami would prettey much attest to what I am saying. 
And if this gentleman actually had the guts to say this in Havana, I can see the reation not only of the goverment but of all Cubans in Cuba.
I don't see him making too many friends in Miami.
LIke I have said, talk to Cubans, see if they feel the same. see what they tell you about racism in Cuba now and before the Revolution,.
BTW. Batista was of mixed race, and most of his generals were also. LOL perhaps he was displeased that he was not represented?
Please, Cuba reveres our ancestry. we never denied our ancestry. I have no idea as to how this man was raised and his hatred for others not of his race.
Not in my lifetime or even now, Have I ever seen the name African Cuban anywhere. and I hope that I never see it in my lifetime.


 

 

 

 

 

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Why is racism still a problem in America?

 

Daniel Harris never thought he would still be discussing racism in 2015.

 

The 64-year-old community activist and church leader said he figured his days of marching and fighting for equality would be long gone. However, with black men still dying after encounters with white police officers and black students protesting racism on college campuses, there is ample evidence that the nation is still divided along racial lines, Harris said.

 

"Yes, we still live in a racist society," said Harris of Asbury Park. "You need another two or three generations to make a change."

 

New findings in a poll released by CNN and the Kaiser Family Foundation show that 49 percent of Americans believe racism is "a big problem." That figure is up from 2011, when just over 25 percent described racism that way. In 1995, 41 percent of Americans called racism a major concern.

 

The survey follows a series of high-profile deaths of unarmed black males in Staten Island; Baltimore; Ferguson, Missouri; and other locales, during encounters with law enforcement — episodes sometimes caught on cellphone videos. In recent weeks, black college students have held protests across the country to redress grievances that have included feelings of alienation, threats and their schools' past ties to segregation and even slavery .

 

The concerns also arise as the leading Republican candidate for president, Donald Trump, has made daily headlines for harsh comments about Mexican immigrants, blacks and other minorities — only to see his poll numbers rise.

Many local leaders say racism appeared to get worse when Barack Obama was elected the nation's first black president in 2008.

 

George Corbin, co-founder of the Asbury Park Community Action Network (CAN), which addresses issues related to crime, said racism never fully disappeared in the United States. Corbin said it was only more subtle and people learned to practice tolerance. Once Obama was elected, he said, people started attacking the president and each other.

 

"We haven’t really evolved like we should as a society," Corbin said. "So it’s spilling over into the media.  It's all over the place. It's self-perpetuating. And I just don't see an end in sight until true leadership rises together."

 

Walter Greason, a history professor at Monmouth University, said many minorities are upset about racial disparities that endure notwithstanding civil rights gains. Blacks, Greason said, still struggle with equal access to jobs and quality housing. In most cities, blacks attend under-resourced, low-performing schools.

 

Greason said people might feel different about racism if leaders in corporate America and government were to step up and create policies that improved opportunities for success.

 

"Everywhere around us there is unrest and anger over how we aren’t treating each other fairly," Greason said. "It's really important to see that everyone is feeling uneasy about how government and companies are treating people and how neighbors are treating each other."

The CNN poll findings are also an indication that perhaps people are more aware of racism, Harris said.

 

He said the media is putting a spotlight on police shootings of black men in unprecedented ways — fueled in no small part by video of controversial encounters between minorities and police.

 

"Black men being killed by cops ... that was always happening," Harris said. "It's just now it gets on the front page of the paper."

 

But the Rev. Gil Caldwell said he believes there is hope. The Black Lives Matter Movement, which has focused new attention on police conduct and violence against blacks, has demonstrated that young people are not standing for racism in the 21st century, he said.

 

Caldwell, 82, of Asbury Park, said he views the movement as a continuation of the work done by activists like himself started in the 1960s.

 

“Younger people are now realizing that things are not as perfect as we thought they were," he said.


"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in DC, 1/27/2017
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