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Re: Why I’m suing for my right to flip off the president

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Message 11 of 18

@Centristsin2010wrote:

@aruzinskywrote:

@Centristsin2010wrote:

 

Why I’m suing for my right to flip off the president


So, you are a woman. Say what?  Good luck proving that your former employer was afraid of retaliation from Trump.  No, mine did not.  Even if you recorded the person who fired you, they could simply testify in court that they lied to you.

 

It's interesting that you condemn the private sector anti-freedom of speech actions of your former employer but not the private sector anti-freedom of speech actions of the AARP. Actually, what's interesting is that for a self-proclaimed "smart guy", you sure are wrong a LOT!  The guy in Asheville NC wasn't killed; the law was a state statute and not local; the GOP in NC created a "be safe" program and that's what was being stepped up.  Now here, you incorrectly assume I'm a woman, I do not have to prove my former employer did anything and I have NOT condemned the private sector has violated freedom of speech laws.  I'm just amazed one who claims they're intelligent can make so many outlandish assumptions, can be so wrong. Again, the term politically bigoted comes to mind.  Seems like a stereotypical liberal double standard to me.  Personally, I wouldn't have fired you for that or use the crybaby button on this forum because I have no double standards. nor many facts.


The lack of quotation marks around "I'm" and "I" fooled me.  Maybe, next time you can use proper grammar and stop acting like a woman by bringing up every past argument, real and imagined. 

 

 

Old Witch
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Re: Why I’m suing for my right to flip off the president

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Message 12 of 18

@aruzinskywrote:

@Centristsin2010wrote:

 

Why I’m suing for my right to flip off the president


So, you are a woman. Say what?  Good luck proving that your former employer was afraid of retaliation from Trump.  No, mine did not.  Even if you recorded the person who fired you, they could simply testify in court that they lied to you.

 

It's interesting that you condemn the private sector anti-freedom of speech actions of your former employer but not the private sector anti-freedom of speech actions of the AARP. Actually, what's interesting is that for a self-proclaimed "smart guy", you sure are wrong a LOT!  The guy in Asheville NC wasn't killed; the law was a state statute and not local; the GOP in NC created a "be safe" program and that's what was being stepped up.  Now here, you incorrectly assume I'm a woman, I do not have to prove my former employer did anything and I have NOT condemned the private sector has violated freedom of speech laws.  I'm just amazed one who claims they're intelligent can make so many outlandish assumptions, can be so wrong. Again, the term politically bigoted comes to mind.  Seems like a stereotypical liberal double standard to me.  Personally, I wouldn't have fired you for that or use the crybaby button on this forum because I have no double standards. nor many facts.


"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in Washington DC, January 21, 2017.
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Re: Why I’m suing for my right to flip off the president

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Message 13 of 18

@gordyflwrote:

 

She might have an uphill battle.

 

I agree, gordy.  She flipped-off the CEO of her company's biggest client.  Company's have been terminating employee's for what they do on the free time for years.  She certainly had the right to give ole trumpy the finger, but the company had the right to fire her as well.  Just as some companies have fired employee's who marched in Charlottesville.

 


"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in Washington DC, January 21, 2017.
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Re: Why I’m suing for my right to flip off the president

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Message 14 of 18

She might have an uphill battle.

 

During the 2004 presidential election, Lynne Gobbell put a "Kerry for President" sticker on her bumper. When her boss saw it, he said Gobbell could "either work for John Kerry or work for me." Gobbell refused to take the sticker off her car and was immediately fired.


Gobbell fell into the black hole of human rights in the United States.


The United States invented human rights. People in many countries can only dream about the freedoms we enjoy. In America, you can criticize any government official you want, including the president, even in rude or profane terms, without fear of punishment. Do the same thing in China, Russia, Iran, Kenya, or Guatemala, and you could wind up in prison or worse.


But Lynne Gobbell's freedom, and yours, disappears every morning when you go to work.

 

The United States Constitution applies to the government, not to corporations. A private business, large or small, can legally ignore your freedom of speech. Where your employer is concerned, you have no such right.
What most Americans generally don't know is that the Constitution doesn't apply to private corporations at all.


And outside the workplace, personal blogs or social media pages on services like Twitter or Facebook offer no refuge.

 

https://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=123024596

 

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Re: Why I’m suing for my right to flip off the president

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Message 15 of 18

 Freedom of speech – – right there in the constitution! Only those prone to the communist type of government will dispute this right— and, we have a few in this forum who seem to be more incluned with the ruthlessness of the communists  with regard to their way of thinking/acting then the ways in which a democracy works.

 The idiot in chief is a disgusting, immoral pig of a person, and someone flipping him off is no more than an minute indication of the disgust people feel for him.  

As for me, flipping this subhuman the bird is a very mild demonstration with regard to the way real Anerican patriots feel about this scum.

Isn’t it funny, when people try to save lives by suggesting the banning of weapons of war,  the anti-American trump zealots scream from the rooftops. But when real patriotic Americans who care about their country and the freedom of its citizens demonstrate their disapproval for this disgusting mentally ill animal masquerading as a president, the fools are up in arms. 

 The trump “presidency” has shown us the dark and immoral underbelly of the American population.  They call themselves the base – –but  moral, intelligent, informed, and patriotic Americans, call them a threat to everything for which our democracy stands. 

 

Gee, I miss having a real president!

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Re: Why I’m suing for my right to flip off the president

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Message 16 of 18

@Centristsin2010wrote:

Why I’m suing for my right to flip off the president

 

One sunny Saturday last fall, I hopped on my bike and headed out for a ride near my home in Virginia. President Trump decided to spend some time outdoors that day, too, at the golf course he owns, not far from my biking route. Our paths crossed on Lowes Island Boulevard. As his motorcade sped by, I extended my middle finger in a brief and almost reflexive expression of my frustration with his mean-spirited and narrow-minded politics.

 

Three days later, I lost my job.

 

A wire service photographer covering Trump captured the gesture, and a Voice of America reporter posted the photo online. It went viral. The next evening, I used the photo as the background on my personal Facebook and Twitter accounts, neither of which mentioned where I worked. But after the weekend, I did let my employer, Akima, know that I was the cyclist in the picture.

 

While acknowledging that the First Amendment protected my right to extend my middle finger, my boss told me that “corporate protection” dictated that he terminate me on the grounds of a social media policy that prohibits “obscene” or “inappropriate” content. Akima does business with the government, and company executives obviously feared that the Trump administration would (unconstitutionally) penalize my employer for my gesture. So, that Tuesday, they forced me out.

 

The First Amendment bars retaliation against me by Trump. But Trump doesn’t need to punish me for my speech if fear of him spurs my employer to do it. And a private employer can’t suppress my freedom of expression on my own time out of fear of illegal government retaliation without violating Virginia employment law, which is why I filed a lawsuit against my former employer this week.

 

I am not alone in having my ability to make a living threatened by my desire to exercise my right to free speech. No one who follows football thinks that all 50 quarterbacks signed by NFL teams in the past year are more talented than Colin Kaepernick. The president’s relentless attacks on Kaepernick’s refusal to stand for the national anthem created an environment in which many teams were reluctant to sign him and risk a backlash that could hurt their bottom line. Now Eric Reid, one of the first to join Kaepernick’s protest, is facing speculation that the salary he can draw as a free agent is reduced because he engaged in political dissent.

 

These are the stories that have made news, but this facilitation of speech suppression is creeping throughout the private sector. Take, for example, Protect Democracy, the nonpartisan, nonprofit organization helping me bring my lawsuit. Members of the group have told me that their mission — preventing a slide to a more authoritarian form of government — has made it difficult for them to rent office space in Cambridge, Mass.; landlords, they say, fear retaliation from the federal government.

 

This sort of behavior is familiar to people living in Egypt, Hungary, Thailand, Turkey and Russia, where the ability to do business increasingly depends on being seen as favorable to the regime. As a result, companies in each of these countries do not hire or do business with known dissenters. And that pressure — making citizens choose between their pocketbooks and their principles — starts a downward spiral that ultimately dismantles a democracy.

 

Let’s call this “autocratic capture.” Autocratic capture is not new to the world, but it is new to this country, and it is up to all of us to keep it from taking root. Our democracy depends on it. As James Madison warned in the early days of the United States, the “value and efficacy” of free elections “depends” on Americans’ “equal freedom” to examine the “merits and demerits of the candidates.” But if Americans can keep their jobs only when they refrain from criticizing the president, then that freedom is lost. And once the freedom to speak is lost, then the rest of our constitutional rights will not be far behind.

 

Why I’m suing for my right to flip off the president


So, you are a woman.  Good luck proving that your former employer was afraid of retaliation from Trump.  Even if you recorded the person who fired you, they could simply testify in court that they lied to you.

 

It's interesting that you condemn the private sector anti-freedom of speech actions of your former employer but not the private sector anti-freedom of speech actions of the AARP.  Seems like a stereotypical liberal double standard to me.  Personally, I wouldn't have fired you for that or use the crybaby button on this forum because I have no double standards.

 

If this lawsuit turns out well for you, hopefully, someone who suffered at the hands of AARP during the Obama era, will use your lawsuit as a template to successfully sue AARP.

 

 

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Re: Why I’m suing for my right to flip off the president

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Message 17 of 18

What a shame! What an injustice! Our government is increasingly enraptured by "autocratic capture." Dissent, even violent dissent, (as defended by Jefferson against a tyrannical nation) is the foundation of our liberty. The flip side of this freedom is servitude to the State. That's why freedom of speech is the first Amendment.  It has been and will, I hope, always be our trump card.

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Why I’m suing for my right to flip off the president

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Message 18 of 18

Why I’m suing for my right to flip off the president

 

One sunny Saturday last fall, I hopped on my bike and headed out for a ride near my home in Virginia. President Trump decided to spend some time outdoors that day, too, at the golf course he owns, not far from my biking route. Our paths crossed on Lowes Island Boulevard. As his motorcade sped by, I extended my middle finger in a brief and almost reflexive expression of my frustration with his mean-spirited and narrow-minded politics.

 

Three days later, I lost my job.

 

A wire service photographer covering Trump captured the gesture, and a Voice of America reporter posted the photo online. It went viral. The next evening, I used the photo as the background on my personal Facebook and Twitter accounts, neither of which mentioned where I worked. But after the weekend, I did let my employer, Akima, know that I was the cyclist in the picture.

 

While acknowledging that the First Amendment protected my right to extend my middle finger, my boss told me that “corporate protection” dictated that he terminate me on the grounds of a social media policy that prohibits “obscene” or “inappropriate” content. Akima does business with the government, and company executives obviously feared that the Trump administration would (unconstitutionally) penalize my employer for my gesture. So, that Tuesday, they forced me out.

 

The First Amendment bars retaliation against me by Trump. But Trump doesn’t need to punish me for my speech if fear of him spurs my employer to do it. And a private employer can’t suppress my freedom of expression on my own time out of fear of illegal government retaliation without violating Virginia employment law, which is why I filed a lawsuit against my former employer this week.

 

I am not alone in having my ability to make a living threatened by my desire to exercise my right to free speech. No one who follows football thinks that all 50 quarterbacks signed by NFL teams in the past year are more talented than Colin Kaepernick. The president’s relentless attacks on Kaepernick’s refusal to stand for the national anthem created an environment in which many teams were reluctant to sign him and risk a backlash that could hurt their bottom line. Now Eric Reid, one of the first to join Kaepernick’s protest, is facing speculation that the salary he can draw as a free agent is reduced because he engaged in political dissent.

 

These are the stories that have made news, but this facilitation of speech suppression is creeping throughout the private sector. Take, for example, Protect Democracy, the nonpartisan, nonprofit organization helping me bring my lawsuit. Members of the group have told me that their mission — preventing a slide to a more authoritarian form of government — has made it difficult for them to rent office space in Cambridge, Mass.; landlords, they say, fear retaliation from the federal government.

 

This sort of behavior is familiar to people living in Egypt, Hungary, Thailand, Turkey and Russia, where the ability to do business increasingly depends on being seen as favorable to the regime. As a result, companies in each of these countries do not hire or do business with known dissenters. And that pressure — making citizens choose between their pocketbooks and their principles — starts a downward spiral that ultimately dismantles a democracy.

 

Let’s call this “autocratic capture.” Autocratic capture is not new to the world, but it is new to this country, and it is up to all of us to keep it from taking root. Our democracy depends on it. As James Madison warned in the early days of the United States, the “value and efficacy” of free elections “depends” on Americans’ “equal freedom” to examine the “merits and demerits of the candidates.” But if Americans can keep their jobs only when they refrain from criticizing the president, then that freedom is lost. And once the freedom to speak is lost, then the rest of our constitutional rights will not be far behind.

 

Why I’m suing for my right to flip off the president


"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in Washington DC, January 21, 2017.
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