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Valued Social Butterfly
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Washington New Long Term Care Benefit

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Earlier this month, the state of Washington's Governor Inslee signed this new state long term care initiative into law.

 

 

Inslee on Monday (05/13/2019) also signed into law a bill creating what’s believed to be the nation’s first state-run, long-term care insurance program.

 

Under the program, employees in Washington will pay a new .58% payroll tax beginning in 2022 – or about $6 per month for every $1,000 a person makes.

 

In 2025, the program will begin paying out benefits. To be eligible for coverage, Washington residents will have to

  • work three years within the previous six years
  • or a total of 10 years with at least five years of uninterrupted work.
  • In addition, a person will have to work at least 500 hours in a year for that year to count towards eligibility.
  • People who have purchased long-term care insurance could opt out of the program.

To qualify for the benefit, Washington’s Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) will have to determine a person needs help with at least three daily living tasks. The maximum lifetime benefit will be $36,500 per person, tied to the consumer price index, and could be used to pay for things like adaptive equipment, in-home care or assisted living.

 

Supporters of the new long-term benefit say it’s needed because the majority of people 65 and older will need some form of long-term care, yet more than 90% of Washington seniors don’t have long-term care insurance, which is expensive and offered on a limited basis by private insurers.

 

. . . . Republicans also questioned whether the $36,500 benefit was sufficient. According to the state, the average cost for in-home Medicaid care is $24,000 a year and nursing home care is $65,000 a year.  Think the "state" is a little low with both of these numbers. *

 

* On average, non-medical home care costs $4,004 per month for seniors whose caregivers work 44 hours per week, according to the latest Genworth Cost of Care survey. Seniors who pay for a private room in a nursing home, however, pay an average of $8,365 per month.

https://homehealthcarenews.com/2019/05/new-long-term-care-law-could-lead-to-a-home-care-business-boo...

 

https://www.kuow.org/stories/washington-becomes-first-state-to-offer-public-health-insurance-option-...

 

In reality - it is the cost of Medicaid paying for LTC that is the problem.  States are looking for every penny to save in Medicaid cost.

* * * * It's Always Something . . . Roseanne Roseannadanna
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