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Re: USA's Unique Healthcare Problem

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@williamb39198 wrote:

To address the problem, let’s ask this starter question:

Is it that we are not capable of figuring out and coming up with an equitable, fair 

healthcare system?

Or is there too much money, politics, and influence preventing coming up with an equitable, fair healthcare system?

 

Never Forget 


Both

 

Too Many Incompetent Incumbents - Case in Point - Pelosi says today that Trump is not worth Impeaching - thats a Poltical Calculation and nothing to do with Justice or Criminality

 

She's worried about the Clinton Model - Clinton was Impeached for lying about a - You Know

 

Trump is Guilty of Conspiracy Against the USA with Foreign Government probably at least Russia & now we are learning about The UAE & Saudi Arabia

 

Principle and the Rule of Law should Trump - Trump & Politics Everytime or we cease to be a Country Based on the Rule of Law

 

I'm getting to your Questions

 

We have morphed into a Kleptocracy - everything is for sale - Trumps running a Pay to Play Scheme Right Out in Public at Both Mar a Lago and The Trump Hotel..........& he still has his Base & No Charges Against Hime - you think the the Members of Congress are going to cut off their own supplies of SUGAR under those circumstances?

 

Patients/Consumers have No Say in their Healthcare or few in Congress who care anything about what is really in their best interests regarding the Quality of their Healthcare the Availability or the Cost

 

It's who contributes the most to their Re-election

 

Ilian Omar asks about Money in Politics and is branded a Anti-semite by both Parties

 

She's right & the Resolution passed by a Democratic House proves beyond a reasonable doubt - IT IS ALL ABOUT THE BENJAMINS!

 

Many of us have posted Reams & Reams of Factual Data proving that Healthcare in the USA is Corrupt and how other less sophisticated and technologically capable Countries proved their Citizens better outcomes at lower costs

 

We need a large young aggressive Progressive Democratic Freshman Class in the Senate in 2020 & things will start changing

 

 

 

 

 

( " China if You're Listening - Get Trumps Tax Returns " )

" )
" - Anonymous

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Re: USA's Unique Healthcare Problem

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Message 2 of 10

To address the problem, let’s ask this starter question:

Is it that we are not capable of figuring out and coming up with an equitable, fair 

healthcare system?

Or is there too much money, politics, and influence preventing coming up with an equitable, fair healthcare system?

 

Never Forget 

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Re: USA's Unique Healthcare Problem

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Message 3 of 10

 

medicare for all.png

 

( " China if You're Listening - Get Trumps Tax Returns " )

" )
" - Anonymous

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Re: USA's Unique Healthcare Problem

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Big Pharma, Insurers, Hospitals Team Up to Kill Medicare for All.


The giants of the healthcare industry agree on one thing: Medicare for All cannot become law.


Partnership for America’s Health Care Future (PAHCF), a group comprised of major drugmakers, insurance companies and private hospitals, has spent the last several months lobbying members of Congress, running online ads and working with the media to drive down popularity of Medicare for All, a single-payer health platform that continues to gain popularity in the Democratic party.


The members of the partnership have a lot of money and influence to spend on Capitol Hill.


They spent a combined $143 million lobbying in 2018 alone, according to data from the Center for Responsive Politics.


The development of a broad anti-Medicare for All coalition isn’t surprising.


As with every time a major U.S. health care reform bill is discussed, industry giants have a lot to lose and a major incentive to fight.


PAHCF recently launched efforts to get the public on their side. The group has spent at least $80,594 on Facebook ads since it released its first ads in late January and at least $13,000 on Twitter ads.

 

https://www.commondreams.org/views/2019/03/08/big-pharma-insurers-hospitals-team-kill-medicare-all

 

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Re: USA's Unique Healthcare Problem

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@MaVolta wrote:

@mickstuder wrote:


Almost Every Other Major Civilized Industrialized Country in the World Has = Figured it Out

 

Their Healthcare is Less Expensive

 

Their Healthcare Produces Better Quality Outcomes

 

Their Costs for the Same Exact Drugs Are Less

 

 

The Only Difference between these other Countries and the US is Politics

 

More Importantly - the MONEY that is allowed to Purchase Influence in the USA's Politics

 

Every Incumbent is Responsible

 

The Freshman Democrats - Elected by the US Voters Are Trying to Expose this Kleptocracy

 

Guess What - the Democratic House has passed a limited amount of Legislation since taking Control

 

With all the Problems facing this Country

 

One of the First Bills They Passed Was To Send a Message To Anyone in Congress Who Would DARE TO ASK QUESTIONS ABOUT THE - STATUS QUO

 

Especially Where The Money is Coming From and Who is Accepting it

 

 


Hey, I agree with you. Other countries have come up with systems that work very well, but they never had to detangle themselves from private insurance to the extent that it exists in the US today. I would think that the compensation part would be the easier obstacle to overcome since it seems logical that employers would do a benefit swap from private to public / single payer.

 

The bigger hurdle seems to be what to do with the 500,000 or so people who work in the private health insurance industry. Where do they go? And how long does it take to transition them elsewhere? 

 

 

 


Americans need to learn how to - walk away - from - Whataboutism!

 

This inability to act - to do the right thing - to do the logical - to do the best thing for the greatest good - has got to stop

 

We have got to do away with this - too big too fail - too many people will be hurt paralysis

 

It's - oh The Coal Miners - oh the pony Express - the Milkman - the Telephone Operators - the Naval Ship Yard Workers

 

In the area I live in - Liberty Mutual is the largest Employer - there are dozens & dozens of Huge Office Parks in multiple different communities with thousand & thousands of Liberty Mutual employees - they get huge tax breaks - carte blanche to build anything - anywhere they want - all the local Tax Payers have to absorb all the additional costs to include walkways over major thoroughfares - additional cross walks & traffic lights etc etc - most of the employees don't even live in NEW HAMPSHIRE - they drive from Mass or Maine

 

Technology & better English Speaking Foreigners living in places like India are going to put these people out of work over time anyway

 

I think better quality - lower cost - better outcome Healthcare is worth repurposing them Right Now

 

 

( " China if You're Listening - Get Trumps Tax Returns " )

" )
" - Anonymous

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Re: USA's Unique Healthcare Problem

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@mickstuder wrote:


Almost Every Other Major Civilized Industrialized Country in the World Has = Figured it Out

 

Their Healthcare is Less Expensive

 

Their Healthcare Produces Better Quality Outcomes

 

Their Costs for the Same Exact Drugs Are Less

 

 

The Only Difference between these other Countries and the US is Politics

 

More Importantly - the MONEY that is allowed to Purchase Influence in the USA's Politics

 

Every Incumbent is Responsible

 

The Freshman Democrats - Elected by the US Voters Are Trying to Expose this Kleptocracy

 

Guess What - the Democratic House has passed a limited amount of Legislation since taking Control

 

With all the Problems facing this Country

 

One of the First Bills They Passed Was To Send a Message To Anyone in Congress Who Would DARE TO ASK QUESTIONS ABOUT THE - STATUS QUO

 

Especially Where The Money is Coming From and Who is Accepting it

 

 


Hey, I agree with you. Other countries have come up with systems that work very well, but they never had to detangle themselves from private insurance to the extent that it exists in the US today. I would think that the compensation part would be the easier obstacle to overcome since it seems logical that employers would do a benefit swap from private to public / single payer.

 

The bigger hurdle seems to be what to do with the 500,000 or so people who work in the private health insurance industry. Where do they go? And how long does it take to transition them elsewhere? 

 

 

 

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Re: USA's Unique Healthcare Problem

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@mickstuder wrote:

Democrats’ Medicare for All debate has turned into a referendum on the existence of private health insurance. But simply having private health insurance isn’t the weird thing about the U.S. system — the weird thing is how we go about it.

 

The big picture: Health care in the U.S. is yoked to employment — it's a form of compensation for workers, and then we use a smattering of public programs to fill in the gaps.

 

Other rich countries, though, treat health care like a social program and organize their systems accordingly. And their way is cheaper and more effective.

 

About half of all Americans have health insurance through an employer, making it the single biggest source of coverage in the country.

  • If you look at other rich countries comparable to the U.S., you’ll find plenty of roles for private insurance. But you won’t find such a close tie between work and health care very often.
  • Most of those countries’ health care systems have better results than we do, for a lot less money. They’re also able to cover almost their entire populations.

How it works: If you get health insurance through your job, your employer probably pays most of your premiums. It doesn’t have to pay taxes on those benefits.

  • That’s the single biggest tax break in the U.S. In 2018 alone, it allowed employers to avoid some $280 billion in taxes they otherwise would have owed, per the Tax Policy Center.

“One of the distortions in the market is the tax advantage. Whether employers want to be in this business, the evidence is mixed,” said Ashish Jha, the director of Harvard Global Health Institute.

  • Some companies love being able to provide tax-free compensation, he said, while others, especially smaller businesses, are overwhelmed by the complexity of managing health benefits and would simply prefer to not have to take on that workload.
  • Employers’ piece of the pie adds up to about 20% of total U.S. health care spending, according to federal data.

“In other countries [employers will] contribute, but not be responsible for providing the insurance,” said Irene Papanicolas, a health economist at the London School of Economics.

The closest comparisons to the U.S., among performing European countries, would probably be Switzerland and the Netherlands, Papanicolas and Jha said.

  • Both of those countries have achieved universal coverage through private insurance.
  • But the government tightly regulates what those plans cover, so even when a change in job might cause you to change insurance, the differences won’t be as great as they can be in the U.S., Jha said.
  • Those countries, like most of Europe, also have stronger safety nets for people who are unemployed.

Between the lines: The Affordable Care Act tried to nudge the U.S. in this direction. It’s a regime of subsidized private insurance that you purchase on your own, which has to cover a specific set of benefits and abide by a standard set of consumer protections.

  • The ACA, though, was limited to low- and middle-income people who didn’t have the ability to buy coverage through their jobs.

That fragmentation — one system for workers, another for the unemployed or self-employed, plus Medicare for seniors, Medicaid for low-income families, one for the military, another for Native Americans — contributes to our wasteful spending by driving up administrative costs.

Almost nowhere in that convoluted process does the U.S. do much to control health care prices — another big difference from similar countries, and obviously a big reason our system is so expensive.

  • We also don’t use the power of government to break up monopolies or ensure that the market for things like hospital care are actually competitive.
  • “We don’t regulate prices and don’t have competition,” Jha said.

The bottom line: “It’s not unique to have a public and private system, but to have so many public and private programs co-existing — I can’t think of any other county that has that,” Papanicolas said.

 

Source - https://www.axios.com/us-health-care-private-insurance-employment-b34153c8-bfd6-449f-9e06-3bafc2ccc0...

 

 


   Here is how the employer paying for health care got started in the USA. During WW2 there was wage and price control. One thing an employer could do was offer new benefits and they did one of which was health insurance with the employer paying part or the entire cost. On my first job I got it free. Another item for all. When people speak of Medicare for all they usually mean a Medicare for all approach which could leave senior medicare program alone just improve it, involve insurance cos., etc. The drafting of an over all program has to be done by experts, and very  few people fit that bill. Being flexible is what is needed by people working on a program.

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Re: USA's Unique Healthcare Problem

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@MaVolta wrote:

Debating the issue is fine. Out of it, one hopes, comes innovation and ideas to improve the delivery of health care to everyone. However, because private insurance is so tightly woven into the fabric of our health care system, it becomes an economic problem in terms of just dismissing it. I can't see Congress ever passing a bill that eliminates private insurance. Not only is it tied to employment compensation, but there are too many industry jobs at stake, and all of those jobs would somehow have to be transitioned to some other insurance or employment sector, and over a long period of time. Maybe there is a brain-trust somewhere that has figured it out, but I'm not finding it with a simple google search.

 

One thing I do like about this younger group of Democrats: They aren't afraid to think outside of the box. We need people with open minds. It's innovation that wins the day. Innovation shouldn't be political, and it doesn't have to be. 

 


Almost Every Other Major Civilized Industrialized Country in the World Has = Figured it Out

 

Their Healthcare is Less Expensive

 

Their Healthcare Produces Better Quality Outcomes

 

Their Costs for the Same Exact Drugs Are Less

 

 

The Only Difference between these other Countries and the US is Politics

 

More Importantly - the MONEY that is allowed to Purchase Influence in the USA's Politics

 

Every Incumbent is Responsible

 

The Freshman Democrats - Elected by the US Voters Are Trying to Expose this Kleptocracy

 

Guess What - the Democratic House has passed a limited amount of Legislation since taking Control

 

With all the Problems facing this Country

 

One of the First Bills They Passed Was To Send a Message To Anyone in Congress Who Would DARE TO ASK QUESTIONS ABOUT THE - STATUS QUO

 

Especially Where The Money is Coming From and Who is Accepting it

 

 

( " China if You're Listening - Get Trumps Tax Returns " )

" )
" - Anonymous

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Re: USA's Unique Healthcare Problem

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Message 9 of 10

Debating the issue is fine. Out of it, one hopes, comes innovation and ideas to improve the delivery of health care to everyone. However, because private insurance is so tightly woven into the fabric of our health care system, it becomes an economic problem in terms of just dismissing it. I can't see Congress ever passing a bill that eliminates private insurance. Not only is it tied to employment compensation, but there are too many industry jobs at stake, and all of those jobs would somehow have to be transitioned to some other insurance or employment sector, and over a long period of time. Maybe there is a brain-trust somewhere that has figured it out, but I'm not finding it with a simple google search.

 

One thing I do like about this younger group of Democrats: They aren't afraid to think outside of the box. We need people with open minds. It's innovation that wins the day. Innovation shouldn't be political, and it doesn't have to be. 

 

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USA's Unique Healthcare Problem

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Message 10 of 10

Democrats’ Medicare for All debate has turned into a referendum on the existence of private health insurance. But simply having private health insurance isn’t the weird thing about the U.S. system — the weird thing is how we go about it.

 

The big picture: Health care in the U.S. is yoked to employment — it's a form of compensation for workers, and then we use a smattering of public programs to fill in the gaps.

 

Other rich countries, though, treat health care like a social program and organize their systems accordingly. And their way is cheaper and more effective.

 

About half of all Americans have health insurance through an employer, making it the single biggest source of coverage in the country.

  • If you look at other rich countries comparable to the U.S., you’ll find plenty of roles for private insurance. But you won’t find such a close tie between work and health care very often.
  • Most of those countries’ health care systems have better results than we do, for a lot less money. They’re also able to cover almost their entire populations.

How it works: If you get health insurance through your job, your employer probably pays most of your premiums. It doesn’t have to pay taxes on those benefits.

  • That’s the single biggest tax break in the U.S. In 2018 alone, it allowed employers to avoid some $280 billion in taxes they otherwise would have owed, per the Tax Policy Center.

“One of the distortions in the market is the tax advantage. Whether employers want to be in this business, the evidence is mixed,” said Ashish Jha, the director of Harvard Global Health Institute.

  • Some companies love being able to provide tax-free compensation, he said, while others, especially smaller businesses, are overwhelmed by the complexity of managing health benefits and would simply prefer to not have to take on that workload.
  • Employers’ piece of the pie adds up to about 20% of total U.S. health care spending, according to federal data.

“In other countries [employers will] contribute, but not be responsible for providing the insurance,” said Irene Papanicolas, a health economist at the London School of Economics.

The closest comparisons to the U.S., among performing European countries, would probably be Switzerland and the Netherlands, Papanicolas and Jha said.

  • Both of those countries have achieved universal coverage through private insurance.
  • But the government tightly regulates what those plans cover, so even when a change in job might cause you to change insurance, the differences won’t be as great as they can be in the U.S., Jha said.
  • Those countries, like most of Europe, also have stronger safety nets for people who are unemployed.

Between the lines: The Affordable Care Act tried to nudge the U.S. in this direction. It’s a regime of subsidized private insurance that you purchase on your own, which has to cover a specific set of benefits and abide by a standard set of consumer protections.

  • The ACA, though, was limited to low- and middle-income people who didn’t have the ability to buy coverage through their jobs.

That fragmentation — one system for workers, another for the unemployed or self-employed, plus Medicare for seniors, Medicaid for low-income families, one for the military, another for Native Americans — contributes to our wasteful spending by driving up administrative costs.

Almost nowhere in that convoluted process does the U.S. do much to control health care prices — another big difference from similar countries, and obviously a big reason our system is so expensive.

  • We also don’t use the power of government to break up monopolies or ensure that the market for things like hospital care are actually competitive.
  • “We don’t regulate prices and don’t have competition,” Jha said.

The bottom line: “It’s not unique to have a public and private system, but to have so many public and private programs co-existing — I can’t think of any other county that has that,” Papanicolas said.

 

Source - https://www.axios.com/us-health-care-private-insurance-employment-b34153c8-bfd6-449f-9e06-3bafc2ccc0...

 

 

( " China if You're Listening - Get Trumps Tax Returns " )

" )
" - Anonymous

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