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@Controlled42010 wrote:

This is very dangerous to our whole system of "democracy".... Under the current state of emergency and the powers that are given to the "Power" is a very dangerous path.  Got to thank Congress for not fixing these issues before it fell into hands of a egotistical Monarchy, no?

 


@mickstuder wrote:

What we can learn from Fred Korematsu, 75 years after the Supreme Court ruled against him

 

“This was a case that involved a massive travesty of justice to a minority group … who were denied basic due process, the right to a trial, the right to a notice of the charges, the right to attorneys even."

 

Legal scholars have long considered Korematsu v. United States as a part of the “anticanon” — a collection of high-profile Supreme Court cases that were wrongly decided — alongside Plessy v. Ferguson and Dred Scott v. Sandford.

 

The Korematsu ruling 75 years ago held that the executive order authorizing World War II-era Japanese-American incarceration was constitutional. Plessy upheld the constitutionality of segregation and Dred Scott held that people of African descent could not be U.S. citizens.

 

The Korematsu case has a conflicted legacy: While Fred Korematsu’s conviction was eventually overturned and the decision has been repudiated by numerous scholars, judicial nominees, and the Supreme Court itself, some argue that the principles at the foundation of the decision are still prevalent today. And while some lessons have been learned, there is more work to be done.

 

"The first executive order that President [Donald] Trump issued Jan. 27, 2017 was about the Muslim [travel] ban and it immediately raised the alarming parallels to the forefront of my father’s fight for justice and the racial profiling of the Japanese-American community in 1942,” his daughter Karen Korematsu, executive director of the Korematsu Institute, said.

 

In May 2011, the Department of Justice issued a “confession of error” acknowledging that by the time the Korematsu case and the Hirabayashi case — an earlier opinion dealing with the constitutionality of Roosevelt's order — had reached the Supreme Court, “the solicitor general had learned of a key intelligence report that undermined the rationale behind the internment.”

 

“But the solicitor general did not inform the court of the report,” acting Solicitor General Neal Katyal wrote in 2011. “Instead, he argued that it was impossible to segregate loyal Japanese-Americans from disloyal ones.”

Brief 6: In #HawaiivsTrump,proud to be supported by the children of the heroes who challenged Japanese internment in WWII. "The govt’s arguments in this case bear a disturbing similarity to the arguments this Court accepted in Korematsu, Hirabayashi&Yasui"https://t.co/YFkrOwopSQ pic.twitter.com/DbC1DjTdXv

— Neal Katyal (@neal_katyal) April 15, 2018

But while the convictions of Korematsu and others were overturned in the '80s, the Supreme Court did not formally repudiate the case until its 2018 ruling on the Trump travel ban in Trump v. Hawaii.

In a 5-4 ruling upholding the ban, Chief Justice John Roberts wrote, “The forcible relocation of U.S. citizens to concentration camps, solely and explicitly on the basis of race, is objectively unlawful and outside the scope of presidential authority.”

 

For some, that rejection rang hollow.

 

“While he gave a symbolic victory about the Korematsu case, he (Chief Justice John Roberts) then reaffirmed the worst parts of Korematsu: that we will defer to the president when he declares a national security problem,” Minami said of Roberts.

 

Source - https://www.nbcnews.com/news/asian-america/what-we-can-learn-fred-korematsu-75-years-after-supreme-n...

 

 

 

 


 


Yes both the Democrat and Republican Incumbents are responsible for this and so many other examples where they are simply - not doing their Jobs - they are working harder at keeping their jobs then doing their jobs and Americans are going to pay dearly down the road for their Incompetence and Corruptness and the US Kleptocracy that currently exists - just like with this Trump Uncontested - Power Grab

 

 

( " If I do not believe as you believe, it proves that you do not believe as I believe, and this is all that it proves. Sam Adams )

" )
" - Anonymous

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Message 2 of 3

This is very dangerous to our whole system of "democracy".... Under the current state of emergency and the powers that are given to the "Power" is a very dangerous path.  Got to thank Congress for not fixing these issues before it fell into hands of a egotistical Monarchy, no?

 


@mickstuder wrote:

What we can learn from Fred Korematsu, 75 years after the Supreme Court ruled against him

 

“This was a case that involved a massive travesty of justice to a minority group … who were denied basic due process, the right to a trial, the right to a notice of the charges, the right to attorneys even."

 

Legal scholars have long considered Korematsu v. United States as a part of the “anticanon” — a collection of high-profile Supreme Court cases that were wrongly decided — alongside Plessy v. Ferguson and Dred Scott v. Sandford.

 

The Korematsu ruling 75 years ago held that the executive order authorizing World War II-era Japanese-American incarceration was constitutional. Plessy upheld the constitutionality of segregation and Dred Scott held that people of African descent could not be U.S. citizens.

 

The Korematsu case has a conflicted legacy: While Fred Korematsu’s conviction was eventually overturned and the decision has been repudiated by numerous scholars, judicial nominees, and the Supreme Court itself, some argue that the principles at the foundation of the decision are still prevalent today. And while some lessons have been learned, there is more work to be done.

 

"The first executive order that President [Donald] Trump issued Jan. 27, 2017 was about the Muslim [travel] ban and it immediately raised the alarming parallels to the forefront of my father’s fight for justice and the racial profiling of the Japanese-American community in 1942,” his daughter Karen Korematsu, executive director of the Korematsu Institute, said.

 

In May 2011, the Department of Justice issued a “confession of error” acknowledging that by the time the Korematsu case and the Hirabayashi case — an earlier opinion dealing with the constitutionality of Roosevelt's order — had reached the Supreme Court, “the solicitor general had learned of a key intelligence report that undermined the rationale behind the internment.”

 

“But the solicitor general did not inform the court of the report,” acting Solicitor General Neal Katyal wrote in 2011. “Instead, he argued that it was impossible to segregate loyal Japanese-Americans from disloyal ones.”

Brief 6: In #HawaiivsTrump,proud to be supported by the children of the heroes who challenged Japanese internment in WWII. "The govt’s arguments in this case bear a disturbing similarity to the arguments this Court accepted in Korematsu, Hirabayashi&Yasui"https://t.co/YFkrOwopSQ pic.twitter.com/DbC1DjTdXv

— Neal Katyal (@neal_katyal) April 15, 2018

But while the convictions of Korematsu and others were overturned in the '80s, the Supreme Court did not formally repudiate the case until its 2018 ruling on the Trump travel ban in Trump v. Hawaii.

In a 5-4 ruling upholding the ban, Chief Justice John Roberts wrote, “The forcible relocation of U.S. citizens to concentration camps, solely and explicitly on the basis of race, is objectively unlawful and outside the scope of presidential authority.”

 

For some, that rejection rang hollow.

 

“While he gave a symbolic victory about the Korematsu case, he (Chief Justice John Roberts) then reaffirmed the worst parts of Korematsu: that we will defer to the president when he declares a national security problem,” Minami said of Roberts.

 

Source - https://www.nbcnews.com/news/asian-america/what-we-can-learn-fred-korematsu-75-years-after-supreme-n...

 

 

 

 


 

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To Anyone Who Thinks SCOTUS is Supreme - READ

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What we can learn from Fred Korematsu, 75 years after the Supreme Court ruled against him

 

“This was a case that involved a massive travesty of justice to a minority group … who were denied basic due process, the right to a trial, the right to a notice of the charges, the right to attorneys even."

 

Legal scholars have long considered Korematsu v. United States as a part of the “anticanon” — a collection of high-profile Supreme Court cases that were wrongly decided — alongside Plessy v. Ferguson and Dred Scott v. Sandford.

 

The Korematsu ruling 75 years ago held that the executive order authorizing World War II-era Japanese-American incarceration was constitutional. Plessy upheld the constitutionality of segregation and Dred Scott held that people of African descent could not be U.S. citizens.

 

The Korematsu case has a conflicted legacy: While Fred Korematsu’s conviction was eventually overturned and the decision has been repudiated by numerous scholars, judicial nominees, and the Supreme Court itself, some argue that the principles at the foundation of the decision are still prevalent today. And while some lessons have been learned, there is more work to be done.

 

"The first executive order that President [Donald] Trump issued Jan. 27, 2017 was about the Muslim [travel] ban and it immediately raised the alarming parallels to the forefront of my father’s fight for justice and the racial profiling of the Japanese-American community in 1942,” his daughter Karen Korematsu, executive director of the Korematsu Institute, said.

 

In May 2011, the Department of Justice issued a “confession of error” acknowledging that by the time the Korematsu case and the Hirabayashi case — an earlier opinion dealing with the constitutionality of Roosevelt's order — had reached the Supreme Court, “the solicitor general had learned of a key intelligence report that undermined the rationale behind the internment.”

 

“But the solicitor general did not inform the court of the report,” acting Solicitor General Neal Katyal wrote in 2011. “Instead, he argued that it was impossible to segregate loyal Japanese-Americans from disloyal ones.”

Brief 6: In #HawaiivsTrump,proud to be supported by the children of the heroes who challenged Japanese internment in WWII. "The govt’s arguments in this case bear a disturbing similarity to the arguments this Court accepted in Korematsu, Hirabayashi&Yasui"https://t.co/YFkrOwopSQ pic.twitter.com/DbC1DjTdXv

— Neal Katyal (@neal_katyal) April 15, 2018

But while the convictions of Korematsu and others were overturned in the '80s, the Supreme Court did not formally repudiate the case until its 2018 ruling on the Trump travel ban in Trump v. Hawaii.

In a 5-4 ruling upholding the ban, Chief Justice John Roberts wrote, “The forcible relocation of U.S. citizens to concentration camps, solely and explicitly on the basis of race, is objectively unlawful and outside the scope of presidential authority.”

 

For some, that rejection rang hollow.

 

“While he gave a symbolic victory about the Korematsu case, he (Chief Justice John Roberts) then reaffirmed the worst parts of Korematsu: that we will defer to the president when he declares a national security problem,” Minami said of Roberts.

 

Source - https://www.nbcnews.com/news/asian-america/what-we-can-learn-fred-korematsu-75-years-after-supreme-n...

 

 

 

 

( " If I do not believe as you believe, it proves that you do not believe as I believe, and this is all that it proves. Sam Adams )

" )
" - Anonymous

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