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Re: Time to change federal flood insurance

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The sad thing is most of us from different political persuasions could probably put together a plan with a workable solution..not perfect but close enough to have the problem solved in 2 generations, with the payment for risk being put on the entity taking the risk. Together, our statements lead to a better solution than we have now, or will ever see from the government, I see both sides agreeing on changing regualtions, getting rid of some, and enacting others for the betterment of society as a whole. and here we are, doing better than congress hashing it out.
So it begins.
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Re: Time to change federal flood insurance

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Message 2 of 37

@GailL1 wrote:

 


@Richva wrote:

. . . . I would bet that 90% of the people in Houston will not be reimbursed for their losses because, in general, you only buy flood insurance if you are in an existing flood plain. If the river flow changes, you SHOULD buy flood insurance but how many do?  

You raise an interesting point about New Orleans but do not forget that was a man made disaster with levee wall failures. 

How many times should your tax dollars be used to rebuild a home that was originally built in a known flood plain? Six? Seven? As many as it takes until the river or ocean gets tired of destroying it?

I live in New Mexico and we have communities with arsenic in their water but my tax dollars are going to rebuild million dollar homes on the ocean that have flooded several times.  I just think we need different priorities. 


 

 

Somehow, I am getting the impression that you think flood insurance is like homeowners insurance - it is not.

 

Federal flood insurance coverage is capped at $250,000 per building and $100,000 for contents, though you can purchase policies with lower limits.

Depending upon what flood zone the house is in and your choice of deductible, the premiums are very high for this amount of coverage.

 

It does not cover everything especially in walk-out basements or detached garages.  

 

Consumer Reports just did a pretty good synopsis of the program.

Consumer Reports - What Flood Insurance Does and Does NOT Cover

 

Nobody gets a multimillion dollar house rebuilt with the National Flood Insurance Program.

 

I read in USA TODAY that the majority of homes destroyed by Hurricane Harvey were NOT in a designated flood plain.  A lot of the damage was also done by wind and rain.  

 

The he levees in NO would be no match for Hurricanes dropping 3' + of rain in a short period of time.  Katrina did not sit around spinning and dropping continuous rain over NO in 2005.

 

So New Mexico has some arsenic in the water - some of it is natural, I am sure, originating in rocks - We have radon gas where I live because of the underground granite - tributaries of Stone Mountain.

 

Nobody can force people to get flood insurance if they don't have a mortgage - nobody can force people to have even regular homeowners insurance or as in Florida - hurricane insurance if the real estate is owned by them exclusively.

 

In fact, some will be shocked that their regular homeowners policy isn't covering them.

 

 

 

 


That does not mean the dont COLLECT for continually building on the outer banks or wherever. Its subsdized, nd the folks that cnt afford it but PAY for it, cant afford the luxury and dont live on the outer banks. Yes i agree there are historic floods happening, and it is what it is. in 1990 we had what we call a hundred year flood and it was devastating to some..i lived on a hill back then and the creek a quarter mile away flooded about 80 houses and all downtown basements. it is what it is sometimes. As for floodplains being created by new construction..part of thats just poor planning. here.. you guys are gonna pay more taxes than those guys down the hill..so go ahead and pave.

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Re: Time to change federal flood insurance

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Message 3 of 37

@Richva wrote:

@GailL1 wrote:

@gruffstuff wrote:

 

Flood plains are called flood plains for a reason, sea level rise, climate change, and more frequent and stronger storms are going to change how often and how badly flood plains go under water.

 

Areas not considered flood plains today might become flood plains in the future.

 

The best solution is to just not rebuild in flood plains, if the owners have flood insurance just buy them out and tell them to move to higher ground.

 

Don't issue building permits for dwellings in flood plains, as existing buildings are destroyed don't replace them in a flood plain.

 

 


The Flood plain maps are constantly changing due to changes in land use.

What might be perfectly fine in year 2000 is now a flood plain since developments - both residential and commercial - have created so much more impervious surfaces and the water has to go somewhere.  Even with planned storm water direction, it can only take so much water.

 

If ANY area got as much water as this area of Texas got in such a short period of time, it would be flooded.

 

We have had areas in metro Atlanta and rural Georgia where it was not even designated as a flood plain nor was it even close to a water source, flood from many inches of rain in a short period of time.  15+ inches if I remember correctly.

  

Perhaps you should add into your rules of construction, limiting the amount of impervious area.  Or what about increasing the lot size of homes to one every 3-acres - that ought to keep housing "affordable".  HA!!!

 

Why not just do away with the federal Flood Insurance Program - then either people or commercial establishments will have to rebuild on their own or move on, hopefully to another area perhaps not so prone to floods.

OR make the premiums MORE - that happened not too long ago and people screamed.  You do know that unless there is a mortgage, insurance of any kind to protect a structure, isn't really required - it is a preference if there is no mortgage.

 

Perhaps we should just close down New Orleans which is actually below sea level.  

 

OR perhaps EVERYBODY should have to have flood insurance - premiums based on likelihood.  But again, if it rains in feet rather than inches in a short period of time, the water will rise.  

 

How many here have flood insurance?  I do, but living on a slanted down creek lot, with house way above the elevation and with a full 2500 square ft.  walk-out basement with a poured foundation and good landscaping around it, I can only hope I am covered.

 

Would your home be safe if you got 36" or more of rain in a matter of days?

  


You are conflating two things. I would bet that 90% of the people in Houston will not be reimbursed for their losses because, in general, you only buy flood insurance if you are in an existing flood plain. If the river flow changes, you SHOULD buy flood insurance but how many do?  

 

You raise an interesting point about New Orleans but do not forget that was a man made disaster with levee wall failures. 

 

How many times should your tax dollars be used to rebuild a home that was originally built in a known flood plain? Six? Seven? As many as it takes until the river or ocean gets tired of destroying it?

 

I live in New Mexico and we have communities with arsenic in their water but my tax dollars are going to rebuild million dollar homes on the ocean that have flooded several times.  I just think we need different priorities. 

 

 


cmon man..those rich folks NEEd you to pay for that home on the outer banks. Its American Capitalism man. If yer poor grab them boot straps..if yer rich you get socialism to pay yer insurance.

 

So it begins.
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Re: Time to change federal flood insurance

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Message 4 of 37

@GailL1 wrote:

@gruffstuff wrote:

 

Flood plains are called flood plains for a reason, sea level rise, climate change, and more frequent and stronger storms are going to change how often and how badly flood plains go under water.

 

Areas not considered flood plains today might become flood plains in the future.

 

The best solution is to just not rebuild in flood plains, if the owners have flood insurance just buy them out and tell them to move to higher ground.

 

Don't issue building permits for dwellings in flood plains, as existing buildings are destroyed don't replace them in a flood plain.

 

 


The Flood plain maps are constantly changing due to changes in land use.

What might be perfectly fine in year 2000 is now a flood plain since developments - both residential and commercial - have created so much more impervious surfaces and the water has to go somewhere.  Even with planned storm water direction, it can only take so much water.

 

If ANY area got as much water as this area of Texas got in such a short period of time, it would be flooded.

 

We have had areas in metro Atlanta and rural Georgia where it was not even designated as a flood plain nor was it even close to a water source, flood from many inches of rain in a short period of time.  15+ inches if I remember correctly.

  

Perhaps you should add into your rules of construction, limiting the amount of impervious area.  Or what about increasing the lot size of homes to one every 3-acres - that ought to keep housing "affordable".  HA!!!

 

Why not just do away with the federal Flood Insurance Program - then either people or commercial establishments will have to rebuild on their own or move on, hopefully to another area perhaps not so prone to floods.

OR make the premiums MORE - that happened not too long ago and people screamed.  You do know that unless there is a mortgage, insurance of any kind to protect a structure, isn't really required - it is a preference if there is no mortgage.

 

Perhaps we should just close down New Orleans which is actually below sea level.  

 

OR perhaps EVERYBODY should have to have flood insurance - premiums based on likelihood.  But again, if it rains in feet rather than inches in a short period of time, the water will rise.  

 

How many here have flood insurance?  I do, but living on a slanted down creek lot, with house way above the elevation and with a full 2500 square ft.  walk-out basement with a poured foundation and good landscaping around it, I can only hope I am covered.

 

Would your home be safe if you got 36" or more of rain in a matter of days?

 

 

 

 

 

 


We once survived 5 inches in an hour, and man did this place need a new roof. 36 wont flood me..but the ol house might get  ride down that riverbank 10 feet away.

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Re: Time to change federal flood insurance

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Message 5 of 37

@Olderscout66 wrote:

About the claim NFIP will ONLY cover $250,000...What that does is give everyone the ability to get private insurance WITH A $250,000 DEDUCTABLE! Now do you understand how they can afford to keep rebuilding in the same place? 


Just where do you buy "private flood insurance" with a $250K deductible?  Is it Lloyds of London?

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Message 6 of 37

@NOTHAPPENING wrote:

We don't often agree but this time we do. In fact, I would add this to the "government flood insurance":

 

The government flood insurance will pay one catastrophic claim per policy and the owner will become whole again with the proviso that if he chooses to rebuild again, the government will no longer cover that piece of property and insurance must be acquired privately or not at all.


 

I see this as a problem remarkably similar to the federal mortgage interest rate tax deduction. You make an economic decision based on government policy but the government changes the rules.  In this case, I would say no new building will be subsidized by the government and existing claims covered only if the owners build to new flood standards.  I am sure the policy wonks have a better way to put this but that is the general idea. 

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Re: Time to change federal flood insurance

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Message 7 of 37

About the claim NFIP will ONLY cover $250,000...What that does is give everyone the ability to get private insurance WITH A $250,000 DEDUCTABLE! Now do you understand how they can afford to keep rebuilding in the same place?

 

A shade less than 4% of structures covered by National Flood Insurance have been rebuilt multiple times using said insurance so those 4% of structures have consumed 35% of all NFIP payments.

 

Ever since Hurricane Katrina, Houston has been debating what it needs to protect itself from a catastrophic weather event. While that conversation has gone on, the city did what most cities do: carried on business as usual, constructing more than 7,000 residential buildings directly in Harris County’s Federal Emergency Management Agency-designated flood plain since 2010. That doesn't include the re-built ones.

 

The only reason the folks flooded out this time won't be able to get another Taxpayer subsidity is the NFIP  expires on 30 Sept and will need to be re-authorized, which we can depend on our Republican Congress to try and do as job 1.

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Re: Time to change federal flood insurance

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Message 8 of 37

Architects wrestle with the building code issue every day of their professional life.  Building Codes, in the end, protect everyone from things that have happened before. It is unreasonable to think it justifiable to put someone else's life safety or economic well being at risk because of something you 'choose' to do. 

 

For those circumstances, Building Codes are memorialized into Law in most States....and most nations in the world.  Without them, disasters that could be controlled or mitigated will happen repeatedly. That is another of those 'self-evident Truths'. 

 

'Free' should not be taken to mean 'irresponsible'. Those who claim privilege to 'absolute freedom' also voluntarily assume the burden of 'absolute responsibility' for absolutely ALL consequences for what they do AND don't do.  That presumes they have Perfect Knowledge. 'Tain't so.'  Nobody's got it.....not even the ones on this forum who think they do.

 

IF you really want to be 'FREE', go someplace where it really doesn't matter what you do or don't.

I don't think you'll stay long.

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Re: Time to change federal flood insurance

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Message 9 of 37

@Richva wrote:

@GailL1 wrote:

 

Somehow, I am getting the impression that you think flood insurance is like homeowners insurance - it is not.

 

Federal flood insurance coverage is capped at $250,000 per building and $100,000 for contents, though you can purchase policies with lower limits.

Depending upon what flood zone the house is in and your choice of deductible, the premiums are very high for this amount of coverage.

 

It does not cover everything especially in walk-out basements or detached garages.  

 

Consumer Reports just did a pretty good synopsis of the program.

Consumer Reports - What Flood Insurance Does and Does NOT Cover

 

Nobody gets a multimillion dollar house rebuilt with the National Flood Insurance Program.

 

I read in USA TODAY that the majority of homes destroyed by Hurricane Harvey were NOT in a designated flood plain.  A lot of the damage was also done by wind and rain.  

 

The he levees in NO would be no match for Hurricanes dropping 3' + of rain in a short period of time.  Katrina did not sit around spinning and dropping continuous rain over NO in 2005.

 

So New Mexico has some arsenic in the water - some of it is natural, I am sure, originating in rocks - We have radon gas where I live because of the underground granite - tributaries of Stone Mountain.

 

Nobody can force people to get flood insurance if they don't have a mortgage - nobody can force people to have even regular homeowners insurance or as in Florida - hurricane insurance if the real estate is owned by them exclusively.

 

In fact, some will be shocked that their regular homeowners policy isn't covering them.

 

 

 

 


 Well, tell me if it works like this. The Federal government guarantees the value of the home and the private insurance company acts as the intermediary handling the paperwork, etc.  If I build a home in a flood plain, buy flood insurance, and get flooded out, the taxpayer picks up the tab.  I think that is pretty close. 

 

I agree many are going to be surprised but we are not talking about that.  I am saying that the $25billion deficit the insurance program is running should stop. If you want flood insurance, you should have to build according to flood specs. Or, you should take on the risk yourself. 


We don't often agree but this time we do. In fact, I would add this to the "government flood insurance":

 

The government flood insurance will pay one catastrophic claim per policy and the owner will become whole again with the proviso that if he chooses to rebuild again, the government will no longer cover that piece of property and insurance must be acquired privately or not at all.

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Re: Time to change federal flood insurance

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Message 10 of 37

   As a reminder, a President once did develop a plan to prevent the devastation that Houston is experiencing.    But when a certain cohort hate anything that comes from the FED, then they ignore every report that is generated.    With that attitude, history is not to be learned from but repeated.   

 

https://www.washingtonpost.com/outlook/we-already-knew-how-to-reduce-damage-from-floods-we-just-didn...

PRO-LIFE is Affordable Healthcare for ALL .
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