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No........almost every voter in America blames Trump because he failed to rise to the occasion yet again.  Trump was appointed president with the idea that he could administer the country.  He has failed and this is the largest and most deadly failure yet. Other nations have controlled the virus and are now opening up for business again as they wait for a vaccine.  Trump waits for a vaccine as he works on his marketing......presto! 165K Americans dead. 

 

Trump had only to follow the playbook developed during the Obama administration for just this type of pandemic.  Unfortunately, he does not read. 

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The China virus pandemic that caused a world wide economic catastrophe for the people interested in reality and the truth...

 

The DIMMs blame everything on Trump because he won the 2016 election and they refuse to accept the outcome.  And Shazam!  Trump Derangement Syndrome was born...  aka, TDS.  A treatable mental illness by simply learning how our Presidential election arrives at the winner of the election.  It's not the popular vote...

 

 

VIMTSTL
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Calling things by their proper name is not in the Republican playbook, but it's been losing ground for a very long time. For example, we used to call economic disasters "Panics". But when the Republican deregulation of Wall Street and slashing taxes for the Uberrich caused the stock crash of 1929, GOPers in the Hoover Administration wanted a less scary word to describe what they'd done to the nation, so they called it a DEPRESSION. That disaster got so bad and lasted so long the word DEPRESSION was banished from the economic lexicon, so now we have RECESSIONS, and this one is very likely to surpass Hoover's 1929 mess.

 

As for how to get out of this mess, its impossible with Republicans in office ANYWHERE. To halt the spread of the disease, EVERYBODY must wear a mask in public, and Republicans at every level of Government keep this from happening. To get the economy moving again will require keeping millions of consumers able to consume, that will require at least the $600/week income suppliment until the tRumpvid20 (call it by its proper name, right?) allows business to SAFELY reopen and everybody get back to work, but REPUBLICANS will not agree to that UNLESS there's total immunity from lawsuits for the employer's who refuse to protect their workers and Progressives are tired of forgiving Uberrich criminals atthe expense of equal justice under the Law, so that's not going to happen.

 

Republicans need to begin actually thinking about what's happening. Do they really want nothing done until Corporate Oligarchs are free to force their workers into unsafe situations? If not, they can't vote for any Republicans, and neither should anyone else.

 

VOTE THEM OUT

THEN

LOCK THEM UP

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It was interesting how republicans and democrats alike came together during the Great Recession to do bail-outs and other financial stimuli.   People disagreed on approaches, but ultimately they came together and actually DID something.   Imagine what today might look like if we, as a nation, had completely locked down for one or two months, instead of just hot spots like NYC?  But that would have taken leadership.....

 

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The Trump Depression

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https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/lets-call-it-what-it-is-were-in-a-pandemic-depression/2020/0... 

 

Let’s call it what it is. We’re in a Pandemic Depression.

 

It must be clear to almost everyone by now that the sudden and sharp economic downturn that began in late March is something more than a severe recession. That label was, perhaps, justifiable for the 2007-2009 Great Recession, when unemployment reached a peak of 10 percent. It isn’t now.

 

 

“This situation is so dire that it deserves to be called a ‘depression’ — a pandemic depression,” write economists Carmen Reinhart and Vincent Reinhart in the latest issue of Foreign Affairs. “The memory of the Great Depression has prevented economists and others from using that word.”

 

 

It’s understandable. People don’t want to be accused of alarmism and making a bad situation worse. But this reticence is self-defeating and ahistoric. It minimizes the gravity of the crisis and ignores comparisons with the 1930s and the 19th century. That matters. If the hordes of party-goers had understood the pandemic’s true dangers, perhaps they would have been more responsible in practicing social distancing.

 

 

Even after the July jobs report, when the unemployment rate fell from June’s 11.1 percent to 10.2 percent, the labor market remains dismal. Here are comparisons with February, the last month before the pandemic was fully reflected in job statistics: The number of employed fell by 15.2 million; the unemployed rose by 10.6 million; and those not in the labor force increased by 5.5 million.

 

 

“The nineteenth and early twentieth centuries were filled with depressions,” write the husband-and-wife Reinharts. Among economists, they are heavy hitters. She is a Harvard professor, on leave and serving as the chief economist of the World Bank; he was a top official at the Federal Reserve and is now chief economist at BNY Mellon.

 

 

What’s clear is that the Pandemic Depression resembles the Great Depression of the 1930s more than it does the typical post-World War II recession. To simplify slightly: The typical postwar slump occurred when the Fed raised interest rates to reduce consumer price inflation. They lowered rates to stimulate growth.

 

 

By contrast, both the Great Recession and the Pandemic Depression had other causes. The Great Recession reflected runaway real estate and financial speculation and their adverse effects on the banking system. The Pandemic Depression occurred when infection fears and government mandates led to layoffs and an implosion of consumer spending.

 
 

The collateral damage has been huge. Small businesses accounted for 47 percent of private-sector jobs in 2016, estimates the Small Business Administration. Many have failed or will fail because they lacked the cash to survive a lengthy shut down. In a new study, economist Robert Fairlie of the University of California at Santa Cruz reports an 8 percent drop in the number of small businesses from February to June. Among African Americans, the decline was 19 percent; among Hispanics, 10 percent.

 

 

In one respect, the Reinharts have underestimated the parallels between the today’s depression and its 1930s predecessor. What was unnerving about the Great Depression is that its causes were not understood at the time. People feared what they could not explain. The consensus belief was that business downturns were self-correcting. Surplus inventories would be sold; inefficient firms would fail; wages would drop. The survivors of this brutal process would then be in a position to expand.

 

 

This view rationalized patience and passivity. Just wait; things will get better. When they didn’t, anxiety and discontent mounted. There was an intellectual void. Modern scholarship has filled the void. If — at the time — government had been more aggressive, preventing bank failures and embracing larger budget deficits to stimulate spending, the economy wouldn’t have collapsed. The Great Depression wouldn’t have been so great.

 
 

Something similar is occurring today. The interaction between medicine and economics often baffles. Is this a health-care crisis or an economic crisis? Before the New Deal in the 1930s, national leaders followed the conventional wisdom of the day — doing little. Similarly, leaders now are following today’s conventional wisdom, which is to spend lavishly. Will this work or will the explosion of government debt ultimately create a new sort of crisis?

 

 

The language of the past increasingly fits the conditions of the present. The many busts of the 19th century have long been referred to as “depressions” — for example, in the late 1830s, the 1870s and the 1890s. The accepted reality at the time was that mere mortals had little control over economic events. We thought we had moved on, but maybe we haven’t.

 

 

The implications for the economic outlook are daunting. In their essay, the Reinharts distinguish between an economic “rebound” and an economic “recovery.” A rebound implies positive economic growth, which they consider likely, but not enough to achieve full recovery. This would equal or surpass the economy’s performance before the pandemic. How long would that take? Five years is the Reinharts’ best guess — and maybe more.

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