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Re: The GOP's Attacks on Democracy in 5 States

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This is what happens when a political party decides the only way to hang onto power is to undermine democracy. The Republican party needs to go the way of the dinosaurs and then perhaps be rebuilt from the ground up.

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Re: The GOP's Attacks on Democracy in 5 States

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Michigan Republicans are also pushing for the legislature to be able to intervene in ANY court case, at any time, for any reason. 

So it begins.
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Re: The GOP's Attacks on Democracy in 5 States

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Just another example of trump’s and repub influence...their actions are not patriotic, are not democratic, do not make sense for society at large, and do not support our republic or country. 

It’s about greed, power, and the destruction of societal norms. 

@Olderscout66 is right. More goes to top, and they want to keep it. And the heck with others who are not rich and powerful. 

Let’s stand together and deny them. 

 

Never Forget

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Re: The GOP's Attacks on Democracy in 5 States

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@smca wrote:

This is a good summary of the anti-democracy/anti-voter tactics being used by power-hungry state Republicans trying to undue their voters election choices.  To go even deeper, follow the columnist's provided links. 

LIKE THEIR LEADER TRUMP, THEY ARE GOING WAY TOO FAR & WILL DESTROY THE NATION IF THEY'RE NOT STOPPED!

 

 David Leonhardt

Op-Ed Columnist

The Republican Party continues to show an alarming disrespect for democracy. It’s evident right now in Wisconsin, Michigan, Ohio and Missouri, and I’ll get to the details in a moment.

But I first want to emphasize that I’m not talking about normal right-versus-left policy disagreements here. I happen to disagree with the Republican Party’s position on tax policy, for example. But there is nothing inherently anti-democratic about its position. The same goes for much of the rest of the Republican agenda: restricting abortion, passing pro-gun laws, reducing immigration, cutting health care programs and so on.

What’s happening in those four states right now is different. It is an anti-democratic power grab. It is qualitatively different from the usual lawmaking that occurs during so-called lame-duck sessions, just after an election.

Republican officials are trying to change the rules to subvert the voting choices of their state’s citizens. The tactics resemble those now common in European countries sliding toward autocracy, like Hungary.

Let’s take the four states one at a time:

In Wisconsin, where a Democrat won the governor’s and attorney general’s races last month, the Republican-controlled Legislature is hoping to rush through a bill today that would make both offices less powerful. “The legislation is wide-ranging and would limit [the new governor’s] power in a host of ways,” Molly Beck and Patrick Marley of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel write. Among the measures: The Legislature would gain the authority to intervene in court cases that were traditionally overseen by the executive branch.

“No one is really bothering to hide the purpose of this lame duck legislation: to continue the Republicans’ hold on state government, even at the expense of core democratic principles like respect for the separation of powers and majority rule,” Dan Kaufman writes in The Times.

In Michigan, part of the story is similar: Democrats will also become governor and attorney general, and legislators are considering a new law to give themselves control over court cases involving the state.

The Legislature may also strip some powers from the secretary of state, the office that controls elections. And Republicans are trying to use their “legislative majority in the lame duck session to gut popular citizen-initiated laws that would mandate paid sick leave and increase the state’s $9.25 hourly minimum wage to $12 per hour for all workers, including tipped employees, by 2022,” Tom Perkins of Metro Times, a Detroit alt-weekly, writes in Slate.

If the measures pass, Nancy Kaffer of The Detroit Free Press notes that the major Michigan officeholders who would lose authority are all women.

In Ohio, legislators are in less of a rush, because Republicans control the governor’s office and — thanks in part to gerrymandering — the Legislature as well. But they’re still trying to beat back democracy. The Legislature is, as Ari Berman of Mother Jones writes, “introducing legislation to make it nearly impossible for citizen-led groups to amend the state’s constitution.”

Why? Republicans are upset that earlier this year, the state’s voters overwhelmingly passed a constitutional amendment to restrict gerrymandering.

I’ve covered the shenanigans in Missouri in a previous newsletter: Republican legislators are trying to undermine an anti-corruption, anti-gerrymandering law approved by voters in a landslide last month.

The Kansas City Star ran a good Op-Ed last week — co-written by a former Republican legislator and a Kansas City civic leader — explaining the issues.

Finally, it’s worth keeping an eye on democracy in North Carolina. For one thing, there are reasons to believe that the congressional campaign of Mark Harris, a Republican, engaged in widespread voter fraud. A bipartisan panel of state officials has refused to certify the race, given the troubling signs.

North Carolina is also the state where the modern power-stripping trend began. In 2016, Republican legislators passed a law to hamstring the governor’s office after a Democrat won it.

The full Opinion report from The Times follows, including Gail Collins and Bret Stephens in conversation.

 

 


It should be transparently obvious to anone with at least half a brain that the Republicans do NOT want to retain their control TO PASS LEGISLATION. They are ONLY interested in continuing the redistribution of wealth from the Middle Class to the very top of the 1%. NOTHING they have done since gaining power in those States has benefitted the average citizen, EVERYTHING they have done has increased the wealth of the wealthy and deminished the power of ordinary citizens to protect themselves from the whims of the Corporate Oligarchy.

 

They might want to consider the lessons of History - Revolution has ALWAYS come from the middle class - the rich are the oppressors and the poor have no means or time to forment rebellion. The Republican agenda of taking from the ones producing the wealth without fair compensation has worked since 1985, simply because Americans had so much they did not notice the loss until recently. Trump was elected as a POPULIST, not a conservative and 2018 showed the ones being robbed have finally noticed who the robbers are. 

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Re: The GOP's Attacks on Democracy in 5 States

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    What surprised me is that the dismissed Govenors are all-in with this anti-democratic behavior.  

 

     The mistake with this action is that many activists were contemplating what we could do to keep the voters engaged.    This will show leaning -Dems and quasi-GOP folks will want to go back to the Republican party that is proving that they only way that they can win is to CHEAT.  

PRO-LIFE is Affordable Healthcare for ALL .
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The GOP's Attacks on Democracy in 5 States

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This is a good summary of the anti-democracy/anti-voter tactics being used by power-hungry state Republicans trying to undue their voters' election choices.  To go even deeper, follow the columnist's provided links. 

LIKE THEIR LEADER TRUMP, THEY ARE GOING WAY TOO FAR & WILL DESTROY THE NATION IF THEY'RE NOT STOPPED!

 

 David Leonhardt

Op-Ed Columnist

The Republican Party continues to show an alarming disrespect for democracy. It’s evident right now in Wisconsin, Michigan, Ohio and Missouri, and I’ll get to the details in a moment.

But I first want to emphasize that I’m not talking about normal right-versus-left policy disagreements here. I happen to disagree with the Republican Party’s position on tax policy, for example. But there is nothing inherently anti-democratic about its position. The same goes for much of the rest of the Republican agenda: restricting abortion, passing pro-gun laws, reducing immigration, cutting health care programs and so on.

What’s happening in those four states right now is different. It is an anti-democratic power grab. It is qualitatively different from the usual lawmaking that occurs during so-called lame-duck sessions, just after an election.

Republican officials are trying to change the rules to subvert the voting choices of their state’s citizens. The tactics resemble those now common in European countries sliding toward autocracy, like Hungary.

Let’s take the four states one at a time:

In Wisconsin, where a Democrat won the governor’s and attorney general’s races last month, the Republican-controlled Legislature is hoping to rush through a bill today that would make both offices less powerful. “The legislation is wide-ranging and would limit [the new governor’s] power in a host of ways,” Molly Beck and Patrick Marley of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel write. Among the measures: The Legislature would gain the authority to intervene in court cases that were traditionally overseen by the executive branch.

“No one is really bothering to hide the purpose of this lame duck legislation: to continue the Republicans’ hold on state government, even at the expense of core democratic principles like respect for the separation of powers and majority rule,” Dan Kaufman writes in The Times.

In Michigan, part of the story is similar: Democrats will also become governor and attorney general, and legislators are considering a new law to give themselves control over court cases involving the state.

The Legislature may also strip some powers from the secretary of state, the office that controls elections. And Republicans are trying to use their “legislative majority in the lame duck session to gut popular citizen-initiated laws that would mandate paid sick leave and increase the state’s $9.25 hourly minimum wage to $12 per hour for all workers, including tipped employees, by 2022,” Tom Perkins of Metro Times, a Detroit alt-weekly, writes in Slate.

If the measures pass, Nancy Kaffer of The Detroit Free Press notes that the major Michigan officeholders who would lose authority are all women.

In Ohio, legislators are in less of a rush, because Republicans control the governor’s office and — thanks in part to gerrymandering — the Legislature as well. But they’re still trying to beat back democracy. The Legislature is, as Ari Berman of Mother Jones writes, “introducing legislation to make it nearly impossible for citizen-led groups to amend the state’s constitution.”

Why? Republicans are upset that earlier this year, the state’s voters overwhelmingly passed a constitutional amendment to restrict gerrymandering.

I’ve covered the shenanigans in Missouri in a previous newsletter: Republican legislators are trying to undermine an anti-corruption, anti-gerrymandering law approved by voters in a landslide last month.

The Kansas City Star ran a good Op-Ed last week — co-written by a former Republican legislator and a Kansas City civic leader — explaining the issues.

Finally, it’s worth keeping an eye on democracy in North Carolina. For one thing, there are reasons to believe that the congressional campaign of Mark Harris, a Republican, engaged in widespread voter fraud. A bipartisan panel of state officials has refused to certify the race, given the troubling signs.

North Carolina is also the state where the modern power-stripping trend began. In 2016, Republican legislators passed a law to hamstring the governor’s office after a Democrat won it.

The full Opinion report from The Times follows, including Gail Collins and Bret Stephens in conversation.

 

 

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