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Re: THE NFL’S OPPORTUNITY TO STAND

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@jimc91 wrote:

@Richva wrote:

OK, you don't like the way they are protesting (that is kind of the definition of a protest) but how do you feel about the unequal treatment of blacks by police? This is the issue they are trying to address but Trump and his minions want to make it about "the flag".


I agree with Curtis Hill...

 

 

 

 And he undoubtedly cravenly and obsequiously says whatever pence instructs him to say - after all, he IS a republican...

 

 

Gottfried von Berlichingen said it 500 years ago - now it is entirely appropriate and deserved for tRump...
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Re: THE NFL’S OPPORTUNITY TO STAND

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@Richva wrote:

OK, you don't like the way they are protesting (that is kind of the definition of a protest) but how do you feel about the unequal treatment of blacks by police? This is the issue they are trying to address but Trump and his minions want to make it about "the flag".


I agree with Curtis Hill...

 

 

 

 

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Re: THE NFL’S OPPORTUNITY TO STAND

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OK, you don't like the way they are protesting (that is kind of the definition of a protest) but how do you feel about the unequal treatment of blacks by police? This is the issue they are trying to address but Trump and his minions want to make it about "the flag".

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THE NFL’S OPPORTUNITY TO STAND

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BY:  AG of Indianna, Curtis Hill

 

 

THE NFL’S OPPORTUNITY TO STAND

 

 

 

The right to protest doesn’t necessarily mean that the protest is right.

 

While the NFL kneeling saga continues, it is becoming less clear what the kneeling is about.

When it began last season, the kneeling was a protest against alleged police bru- tality and the incidence of blacks killed by police.

 

This season, following criticism against kneeling NFL players by the president of the United States, NFL players picked up the pace in a series of kneelings, arm- lockings and various forms of unity expressions during the playing of the national anthem before the start of each game. Yet it is unclear what players are now pro- testing. Police brutality? Racism? Are they just mad at the president?

 

Highly paid athletes protesting in the comfort of billion-dollar stadiums under the protective gaze of security personnel does little to evoke the image of historic civil rights protests of the ‘50s and ‘60s. Those valiant heroes of our past were largely ordinary people courageously taking extraordinary risks, at great cost, in the name of racial justice.

 

They stood for freedom.

 

It is that same freedom that now enables NFL athletes to protest whatever they choose in whatever manner they choose.

 

So how have they chosen?

 

They have chosen to protest during the anthem. They have chosen police of cers killing blacks as their cause.

 

Whether justi ed or not, loss of life caused by a police shooting is traumatic for the community. Given the legacy of racial injustice in America, that trauma is magni ed greatly when the person killed by the police is black.

 

The lives of black men and women do indeed matter, and NFL athletes have every right to protest the tragic loss of any life, including black lives.

 

These players recognize that their NFL celebrity status affords them a unique plat- form to call attention to matters of importance and perhaps even a responsibility to speak out.

 

And now that the world is watching, the NFL has an opportunity to speak out, in great force, on a tragedy of unspeakable proportion -- the senseless loss of young black lives to black-on-black violence.

 

While it is true that each year a number of blacks die as a result of being shot or otherwise killed by the police, that number is but a fraction of the number of black people murdered by black people.

 

In 2015, 259 blacks were killed by police, according to data collected by the Washington Post.

Even if we were to presume that all 259 police shootings were unjusti ed, that number is dwarfed by the estimated 6,000 black lives senselessly murdered by other blacks.

 

We live in a nation where blacks make up approximately 13 percent of the population and yet account for more than half of the murders. Shockingly, 90 percent of those victims are murdered by other blacks.

 

Something is terribly wrong.

 

https://content.govdelivery.com/attachments/INAG/2017/10/12/file_attachments/895357/NFL%2527s%2BOppo...

 

 

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

Yes, something is terribly wrong...

 

 

 

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