THE IMPORTANCE OF CHALLENGING YOUR BELIEFS

Reply
Treasured Social Butterfly
1
Kudos
425
Views

Re: THE IMPORTANCE OF CHALLENGING YOUR BELIEFS

425 Views
Message 11 of 15

@Centristsin2010 wrote:

THE IMPORTANCE OF CHALLENGING YOUR BELIEFS

 

 "Seeing is believing."

 

Not so fast. In today’s world, I think there is a lot more ‘believing is seeing’ going on. Especially when it comes to people’s core beliefs and opinions.

 

More and more I see people closing their minds to other perspectives and differing ideas because of their dogmatic beliefs that their way or their understanding is correct. In our day and age, can you really blame them? Any belief you have you can pretty much type in on the internet and find hundreds (maybe thousands) of people and articles that support and bolster your beliefs.

 

This is especially true surrounding diet, health, nutrition, and fitness.

 

Paleo is the best diet? Here’s 16,200,000 results that say YES.

Bread is bad for you? Here’s 157,000,000 results that would agree.

Cross fit is a cult? Here’s 397,000 results on board with that claim.

You get my point. Anything and everything you believe can be supported or argued against by merely searching about it online.

 

It leaves us at a loss for what is true….what is reality.

 

But instead of being all out skeptics, people go to the opposite extreme. They latch on to one way of thinking, and then decry any and all information that doesn’t support their one-track mindset. In fact, they actively search out information that supports their beliefs just to feel a sense of security that what they think is correct. In some cases they get angry at anyone who has a differing opinion or evidence that counters their claims. Sound familiar?

 

I bring this up because I think it happens a lot in the world of health. People get defensive about their certain lifestyle and become very intolerant of anyone else who may have found an alternative form of personal wellness. This comes from a place of insecurity. If these people were confident in their beliefs, they wouldn’t feel the need to put down others or or defend their choices to the extreme(sure sounds familar, doesn't it?  Does this happen on this forum?  Far more than we might realize, especially with certain posters).

 

The truth is, we see what we want to see in the world. When we choose to make our beliefs the be all end all, we close the door to all the other good things that could make our life rich. Just because something doesn’t specifically align with what we think doesn’t make it wrong or bad. It just makes it different.

 

If I’ve learned anything, it’s that the world has very few absolutes. What works for some doesn’t work for others, and everyone truly is an individual. There are very few cases when you can place a whole portion of the world under the same umbrella.

 

The thing is though, people like absolutes. They like concrete facts. They like structure. They like routine. And that’s why we easily get caught up with the dogmatic chains of various fitness and diet beliefs. We forget that living with flexibility, acceptance, and outside of black and whites, is really what makes life full.

 

Being open and receptive to others beliefs makes you a more dynamic person. It creates a world of possibilities, makes you a life long learner, and may even help you discover your own truths. You’re more approachable, you’re more empathetic, and you have a more well rounded perspective on the world.

 

So I offer this to you, what if you actively went out of your way to challenge your beliefs

 

More at:  THE IMPORTANCE OF CHALLENGING YOUR BELIEFS

 

Becoming a Critic Of Your Thinking

 

There is nothing more practical than sound thinking. No matter what your circumstance or goals, no matter where you are, or what problems you face, you are better off if your thinking is skilled. As a manager, leader, employee, citizen, lover, friend, parent — in every realm and situation of your life — good thinking pays off. Poor thinking, in turn, inevitably causes problems, wastes time and energy, engenders frustration and pain.

 

Critical thinking is the disciplined art of ensuring that you use the best thinking you are capable of in any set of circumstances. The general goal of thinking is to “figure out the lay of the land” in any situation we are in. We all have multiple choices to make. We need the best information to make the best choices.

 

What is really going on in this or that situation? Are they trying to take advantage of me? Does so-and-so really care about me? Am I deceiving myself when I believe that . . .? What are the likely consequences of failing to . . .? If I want to do . . . , what is the best way to prepare for it? How can I be more successful in doing . . .? Is this my biggest problem, or do I need to focus my attention on something else?

 

Successfully responding to such questions is the daily work of thinking. However, to maximize the quality of your thinking, you must learn how to become an effective "critic" of your thinking. And to become an effective critic of your thinking, you have to make learning about thinking a priority.

 

Ask yourself these — rather unusual — questions: What have you learned about how you think? Did you ever study your thinking? What do you know about how the mind processes information? What do you really know about how to analyze, evaluate, or reconstruct your thinking? Where does your thinking come from? How much of it is of “good” quality? How much of it is of “poor” quality? How much of your thinking is vague, muddled, inconsistent, inaccurate, illogical, or superficial? Are you, in any real sense, in control of your thinking? Do you know how to test it? Do you have any conscious standards for determining when you are thinking well and when you are thinking poorly? Have you ever discovered a significant problem in your thinking and then changed it by a conscious act of will? If anyone asked you to teach them what you have learned, thus far in your life, about thinking, would you really have any idea what that was or how you learned it?

 

If you are like most, the only honest answers to these questions run along the lines of, “Well, I suppose I really don’t know much about my thinking or about thinking in general. I suppose in my life I have more or less taken my thinking for granted. I don’t really know how it works. I have never really studied it. I don’t know how I test it, or even if I do test it. It just happens in my mind automatically.“

 

It is important to realize that serious study of thinking, serious thinking about thinking, is rare. It is not a subject in most colleges. It is seldom found in the thinking of our culture. But if you focus your attention for a moment on the role that thinking is playing in your life, you may come to recognize that, in fact, everything you do, or want, or feel is influenced by your thinking. And if you become persuaded of that, you will be surprised that humans show so little interest in thinking.

 

To make significant gains in the quality of your thinking you will have to engage in a kind of work that most humans find unpleasant, if not painful — intellectual work. Yet once this thinking is done and we move our thinking to a higher level of quality, it is not hard to keep it at that level. Still, there is the price you have to pay to step up to the next level. One doesn’t become a skillful critic of thinking over night, any more than one becomes a skillful basketball player or musician over night. To become better at thinking, you must be willing to put the work into thinking that skilled improvement always requires.

 

This means you must be willing to practice special “acts” of thinking that are initially at least uncomfortable, and sometimes challenging and difficult. You have to learn to do with your mind “moves” analogous to what accomplished athletes learn to do (through practice and feedback) with their bodies. Improvement in thinking, in other words, is similar to improvement in other domains of performance where progress is a product of sound theory, commitment, hard work, and practice.

 

Consider the following key ideas, which, when applied, result in a mind practicing skilled thinking. These ideas represent just a few of the many ways in which disciplined thinkers actively apply theory of mind to the mind by the mind in order to think better. In these examples, we focus on the significance of thinking clearly, sticking to the point (thinking with relevance), questioning deeply, and striving to be more reasonable. For each example, we provide a brief overview of the idea and its importance in thinking, along with strategies for applying it in life. Realize that the following ideas are immersed in a cluster of ideas within critical thinking. Though we chose these particular ideas, many others could have instead been chosen. There is no magic in these specific ideas. In short, it is important that you understand these as a sampling of all the possible ways in which the mind can work to discipline itself, to think at a higher level of quality, to function better in the world.
. 
1. Clarify Your Thinking

 

Be on the look-out for vague, fuzzy, formless, blurred thinking. Try to figure out the real meaning of what people are saying. Look on the surface. Look beneath the surface. Try to figure out the real meaning of important news stories. Explain your understanding of an issue to someone else to help clarify it in your own mind. Practice summarizing in your own words what others say. Then ask them if you understood them correctly. You should neither agree nor disagree with what anyone says until you (clearly) understand them.

 

Our own thinking usually seems clear to us, even when it is not. But vague, ambiguous, muddled, deceptive, or misleading thinking are significant problems in human life. If we are to develop as thinkers, we must learn the art of clarifying thinking, of pinning it down, spelling it out, and giving it a specific meaning. Here’s what you can do to begin. When people explain things to you, summarize in your own words what you think they said. When you cannot do this to their satisfaction, you don’t really understand what they said. When they cannot summarize what you have said to your satisfaction, they don’t really understand what you said. Try it. See what happens.

 

Strategies for Clarifying Your Thinking

 

  • State one point at a time.
  • Elaborate on what you mean 
  • Give examples that connect your thoughts to life experiences 
  • Use analogies and metaphors to help people connect your ideas to a variety of things they already understand (for example, critical thinking is like an onion. There are many layers to it. Just when you think you have it basically figured out, you realize there is another layer, and then another, and another and another and on and on)

 

Here is One Format You Can Use

  • I think . . . (state your main point) 
  • In other words . . . (elaborate your main point) 
  • For example . . . (give an example of your main point) 
  • To give you an analogy . . . (give an illustration of your main point)

 

To Clarify Other People’s Thinking, Consider Asking the Following

 

  • Can you restate your point in other words? I didn’t understand you.
  • Can you give an example?
  • Let me tell you what I understand you to be saying. Did I understand you correctly?

 

2. Stick to the Point

 

Be on the lookout for fragmented thinking, thinking that leaps about with no logical connections. Start noticing when you or others fail to stay focused on what is relevant. Focus on finding what will aid you in truly solving a problem. When someone brings up a point (however true) that doesn’t seem pertinent to the issue at hand, ask, “How is what you are saying relevant to the issue?” When you are working through a problem, make sure you stay focused on what sheds light on and, thus, helps address the problem. Don’t allow your mind to wander to unrelated matters. Don’t allow others to stray from the main issue. Frequently ask: “What is the central question? Is this or that relevant to it? How?”

 

When thinking is relevant, it is focused on the main task at hand. It selects what is germane, pertinent, and related. It is on the alert for everything that connects to the issue. It sets aside what is immaterial, inappropriate, extraneous, and beside the point. What is relevant directly bears upon (helps solve) the problem you are trying to solve. When thinking drifts away from what is relevant, it needs to be brought back to what truly makes a difference. Undisciplined thinking is often guided by associations (this reminds me of that, that reminds me of this other thing) rather than what is logically connected (“If a and b are true, then c must also be true”). Disciplined thinking intervenes when thoughts wander from what is pertinent and germane concentrating the mind on only those things that help it figure out what it needs to figure out.

Ask These Questions to Make Sure Thinking is Focused on What is Relevant

 

  • Am I focused on the main problem or task?
  • How is this connected? How is that?
  • Does my information directly relate to the problem or task?
  • Where do I need to focus my attention? 
  • Are we being diverted to unrelated matters?
  • Am I failing to consider relevant viewpoints?
  • How is your point relevant to the issue we are addressing?
  • What facts are actually going to help us answer the question? What considerations should be set aside?
  • Does this truly bear on the question? How does it connect?

3. Question Questions

 

Be on the lookout for questions. The ones we ask. The ones we fail to ask. Look on the surface. Look beneath the surface. Listen to how people question, when they question, when they fail to question. Look closely at the questions asked. What questions do you ask, should you ask? Examine the extent to which you are a questioner, or simply one who accepts the definitions of situations given by others.

 

Most people are not skilled questioners. Most accept the world as it is presented to them. And when they do question, their questions are often superficial or “loaded.” Their questions do not help them solve their problems or make better decisions. Good thinkers routinely ask questions in order to understand and effectively deal with the world around them. They question the status quo. They know that things are often different from the way they are presented. Their questions penetrate images, masks, fronts, and propaganda. Their questions make real problems explicit and discipline their thinking through those problems. If you become a student of questions, you can learn to ask powerful questions that lead to a deeper and more fulfilling life. Your questions become more basic, essential, and deep.

 

More at:  Becoming a Critic Of Your Thinking

 

One poster claims they actually changed political parties because the posters he considered were a part of the his party, not the party itself, disagreed with his views on religious discrimination and his desire for the Confederate Battle flag.  Rather odd considering he never agreed with the other party previously.

 

There are other posters here who don't post as often as they used to; they often claim they don't like others disagreeing with them; they didn't want to argue, as if that was the only outcome.  (it's takes two to argue_  It's sad they just want to post their opinion and don't want to be challenged on anything, so the stay way.  It's sad to see mature adults so obstinate in their views that they want to say what they like, but don't ever challenge them or ask them to think critically, or explain their view.  Haven't these folks already given up being objective and open-minded?

 

It's wise and smart to have one's views challenged.  It helps one develop an open-minded thought process and facilitates their personal growth, especially their mental growth and vitality.  This is something we can all use as we age.  It's when we stop growing, that we already have one foot in the grave.

 

What are your thoughts?

 

 


It would be helpful for me...................if you could provide an example of a time you've challenged your own beliefs and found them to need tweaking?

 

Lets keep it simple and establish a timeframe - say over the time you've been posting on this Forum

 

I find that on this Forum I get a lot of suggestions from Others about how I don;t process things correctly or I'm being Obtuse but I can honestly say - I've never encountered a situation where someone changed their point of view after reading the comments from others 

 

Well - except for me of course...........................

 

 

( " China if You're Listening - Get Trumps Tax Returns " )

" )
" - Anonymous

Report Inappropriate Content
1
Kudos
425
Views
Valued Social Butterfly
3
Kudos
429
Views

Re: THE IMPORTANCE OF CHALLENGING YOUR BELIEFS

429 Views
Message 12 of 15

@Centristsin2010 - Good post.

 

I believe that it's better if I challenge my own beliefs before someone else does. At least then I know what I am defending, rather than just being defensive or posturing. I was raised to be pragmatic, to think for myself and not just follow the crowd. But even so, it's still easy to get pulled or swayed. Influence peddling is a science, just ask Madison Avenue. 

Report Inappropriate Content
3
Kudos
429
Views
Treasured Social Butterfly
1
Kudos
432
Views

Re: THE IMPORTANCE OF CHALLENGING YOUR BELIEFS

432 Views
Message 13 of 15

@Centristsin2010 Quite an interesting post. Right up my alley, so to speak. I spot read your post, but am actually just taking a break from a detailed thought process on a time-sensitive project so don't have the ability to digest this at the moment. I will get back to it, (possibly next week, so I plan to email your post to myself and then unsub the thread), so thanks for posting.

 

On the arguing thing ... a person can challenge their own thoughts through politically opposite RL friends, research and reading both sides of the aisle, if you will. It is not necessary to have a battle of wits in an online forum in order to review one's thought process. I, for one, find online haggling distasteful and unproductive. 

 

She of the yen for forward motion and more than a few spinning plates Smiley Happy

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
Report Inappropriate Content
1
Kudos
432
Views
Treasured Social Butterfly
3
Kudos
445
Views

Re: THE IMPORTANCE OF CHALLENGING YOUR BELIEFS

445 Views
Message 14 of 15
a lot of people here dont stick to the point. Good post. My positions have evolved over 40 years of adulthood, watching what works and what doesnt, and reading some world history.
So it begins.
Report Inappropriate Content
3
Kudos
445
Views
Highlighted
Treasured Social Butterfly
6
Kudos
435
Views
14
Replies

THE IMPORTANCE OF CHALLENGING YOUR BELIEFS

435 Views
Message 15 of 15

THE IMPORTANCE OF CHALLENGING YOUR BELIEFS

 

 "Seeing is believing."

 

Not so fast. In today’s world, I think there is a lot more ‘believing is seeing’ going on. Especially when it comes to people’s core beliefs and opinions.

 

More and more I see people closing their minds to other perspectives and differing ideas because of their dogmatic beliefs that their way or their understanding is correct. In our day and age, can you really blame them? Any belief you have you can pretty much type in on the internet and find hundreds (maybe thousands) of people and articles that support and bolster your beliefs.

 

This is especially true surrounding diet, health, nutrition, and fitness.

 

Paleo is the best diet? Here’s 16,200,000 results that say YES.

Bread is bad for you? Here’s 157,000,000 results that would agree.

Cross fit is a cult? Here’s 397,000 results on board with that claim.

You get my point. Anything and everything you believe can be supported or argued against by merely searching about it online.

 

It leaves us at a loss for what is true….what is reality.

 

But instead of being all out skeptics, people go to the opposite extreme. They latch on to one way of thinking, and then decry any and all information that doesn’t support their one-track mindset. In fact, they actively search out information that supports their beliefs just to feel a sense of security that what they think is correct. In some cases they get angry at anyone who has a differing opinion or evidence that counters their claims. Sound familiar?

 

I bring this up because I think it happens a lot in the world of health. People get defensive about their certain lifestyle and become very intolerant of anyone else who may have found an alternative form of personal wellness. This comes from a place of insecurity. If these people were confident in their beliefs, they wouldn’t feel the need to put down others or or defend their choices to the extreme(sure sounds familar, doesn't it?  Does this happen on this forum?  Far more than we might realize, especially with certain posters).

 

The truth is, we see what we want to see in the world. When we choose to make our beliefs the be all end all, we close the door to all the other good things that could make our life rich. Just because something doesn’t specifically align with what we think doesn’t make it wrong or bad. It just makes it different.

 

If I’ve learned anything, it’s that the world has very few absolutes. What works for some doesn’t work for others, and everyone truly is an individual. There are very few cases when you can place a whole portion of the world under the same umbrella.

 

The thing is though, people like absolutes. They like concrete facts. They like structure. They like routine. And that’s why we easily get caught up with the dogmatic chains of various fitness and diet beliefs. We forget that living with flexibility, acceptance, and outside of black and whites, is really what makes life full.

 

Being open and receptive to others beliefs makes you a more dynamic person. It creates a world of possibilities, makes you a life long learner, and may even help you discover your own truths. You’re more approachable, you’re more empathetic, and you have a more well rounded perspective on the world.

 

So I offer this to you, what if you actively went out of your way to challenge your beliefs

 

More at:  THE IMPORTANCE OF CHALLENGING YOUR BELIEFS

 

Becoming a Critic Of Your Thinking

 

There is nothing more practical than sound thinking. No matter what your circumstance or goals, no matter where you are, or what problems you face, you are better off if your thinking is skilled. As a manager, leader, employee, citizen, lover, friend, parent — in every realm and situation of your life — good thinking pays off. Poor thinking, in turn, inevitably causes problems, wastes time and energy, engenders frustration and pain.

 

Critical thinking is the disciplined art of ensuring that you use the best thinking you are capable of in any set of circumstances. The general goal of thinking is to “figure out the lay of the land” in any situation we are in. We all have multiple choices to make. We need the best information to make the best choices.

 

What is really going on in this or that situation? Are they trying to take advantage of me? Does so-and-so really care about me? Am I deceiving myself when I believe that . . .? What are the likely consequences of failing to . . .? If I want to do . . . , what is the best way to prepare for it? How can I be more successful in doing . . .? Is this my biggest problem, or do I need to focus my attention on something else?

 

Successfully responding to such questions is the daily work of thinking. However, to maximize the quality of your thinking, you must learn how to become an effective "critic" of your thinking. And to become an effective critic of your thinking, you have to make learning about thinking a priority.

 

Ask yourself these — rather unusual — questions: What have you learned about how you think? Did you ever study your thinking? What do you know about how the mind processes information? What do you really know about how to analyze, evaluate, or reconstruct your thinking? Where does your thinking come from? How much of it is of “good” quality? How much of it is of “poor” quality? How much of your thinking is vague, muddled, inconsistent, inaccurate, illogical, or superficial? Are you, in any real sense, in control of your thinking? Do you know how to test it? Do you have any conscious standards for determining when you are thinking well and when you are thinking poorly? Have you ever discovered a significant problem in your thinking and then changed it by a conscious act of will? If anyone asked you to teach them what you have learned, thus far in your life, about thinking, would you really have any idea what that was or how you learned it?

 

If you are like most, the only honest answers to these questions run along the lines of, “Well, I suppose I really don’t know much about my thinking or about thinking in general. I suppose in my life I have more or less taken my thinking for granted. I don’t really know how it works. I have never really studied it. I don’t know how I test it, or even if I do test it. It just happens in my mind automatically.“

 

It is important to realize that serious study of thinking, serious thinking about thinking, is rare. It is not a subject in most colleges. It is seldom found in the thinking of our culture. But if you focus your attention for a moment on the role that thinking is playing in your life, you may come to recognize that, in fact, everything you do, or want, or feel is influenced by your thinking. And if you become persuaded of that, you will be surprised that humans show so little interest in thinking.

 

To make significant gains in the quality of your thinking you will have to engage in a kind of work that most humans find unpleasant, if not painful — intellectual work. Yet once this thinking is done and we move our thinking to a higher level of quality, it is not hard to keep it at that level. Still, there is the price you have to pay to step up to the next level. One doesn’t become a skillful critic of thinking over night, any more than one becomes a skillful basketball player or musician over night. To become better at thinking, you must be willing to put the work into thinking that skilled improvement always requires.

 

This means you must be willing to practice special “acts” of thinking that are initially at least uncomfortable, and sometimes challenging and difficult. You have to learn to do with your mind “moves” analogous to what accomplished athletes learn to do (through practice and feedback) with their bodies. Improvement in thinking, in other words, is similar to improvement in other domains of performance where progress is a product of sound theory, commitment, hard work, and practice.

 

Consider the following key ideas, which, when applied, result in a mind practicing skilled thinking. These ideas represent just a few of the many ways in which disciplined thinkers actively apply theory of mind to the mind by the mind in order to think better. In these examples, we focus on the significance of thinking clearly, sticking to the point (thinking with relevance), questioning deeply, and striving to be more reasonable. For each example, we provide a brief overview of the idea and its importance in thinking, along with strategies for applying it in life. Realize that the following ideas are immersed in a cluster of ideas within critical thinking. Though we chose these particular ideas, many others could have instead been chosen. There is no magic in these specific ideas. In short, it is important that you understand these as a sampling of all the possible ways in which the mind can work to discipline itself, to think at a higher level of quality, to function better in the world.
. 
1. Clarify Your Thinking

 

Be on the look-out for vague, fuzzy, formless, blurred thinking. Try to figure out the real meaning of what people are saying. Look on the surface. Look beneath the surface. Try to figure out the real meaning of important news stories. Explain your understanding of an issue to someone else to help clarify it in your own mind. Practice summarizing in your own words what others say. Then ask them if you understood them correctly. You should neither agree nor disagree with what anyone says until you (clearly) understand them.

 

Our own thinking usually seems clear to us, even when it is not. But vague, ambiguous, muddled, deceptive, or misleading thinking are significant problems in human life. If we are to develop as thinkers, we must learn the art of clarifying thinking, of pinning it down, spelling it out, and giving it a specific meaning. Here’s what you can do to begin. When people explain things to you, summarize in your own words what you think they said. When you cannot do this to their satisfaction, you don’t really understand what they said. When they cannot summarize what you have said to your satisfaction, they don’t really understand what you said. Try it. See what happens.

 

Strategies for Clarifying Your Thinking

 

  • State one point at a time.
  • Elaborate on what you mean 
  • Give examples that connect your thoughts to life experiences 
  • Use analogies and metaphors to help people connect your ideas to a variety of things they already understand (for example, critical thinking is like an onion. There are many layers to it. Just when you think you have it basically figured out, you realize there is another layer, and then another, and another and another and on and on)

 

Here is One Format You Can Use

  • I think . . . (state your main point) 
  • In other words . . . (elaborate your main point) 
  • For example . . . (give an example of your main point) 
  • To give you an analogy . . . (give an illustration of your main point)

 

To Clarify Other People’s Thinking, Consider Asking the Following

 

  • Can you restate your point in other words? I didn’t understand you.
  • Can you give an example?
  • Let me tell you what I understand you to be saying. Did I understand you correctly?

 

2. Stick to the Point

 

Be on the lookout for fragmented thinking, thinking that leaps about with no logical connections. Start noticing when you or others fail to stay focused on what is relevant. Focus on finding what will aid you in truly solving a problem. When someone brings up a point (however true) that doesn’t seem pertinent to the issue at hand, ask, “How is what you are saying relevant to the issue?” When you are working through a problem, make sure you stay focused on what sheds light on and, thus, helps address the problem. Don’t allow your mind to wander to unrelated matters. Don’t allow others to stray from the main issue. Frequently ask: “What is the central question? Is this or that relevant to it? How?”

 

When thinking is relevant, it is focused on the main task at hand. It selects what is germane, pertinent, and related. It is on the alert for everything that connects to the issue. It sets aside what is immaterial, inappropriate, extraneous, and beside the point. What is relevant directly bears upon (helps solve) the problem you are trying to solve. When thinking drifts away from what is relevant, it needs to be brought back to what truly makes a difference. Undisciplined thinking is often guided by associations (this reminds me of that, that reminds me of this other thing) rather than what is logically connected (“If a and b are true, then c must also be true”). Disciplined thinking intervenes when thoughts wander from what is pertinent and germane concentrating the mind on only those things that help it figure out what it needs to figure out.

Ask These Questions to Make Sure Thinking is Focused on What is Relevant

 

  • Am I focused on the main problem or task?
  • How is this connected? How is that?
  • Does my information directly relate to the problem or task?
  • Where do I need to focus my attention? 
  • Are we being diverted to unrelated matters?
  • Am I failing to consider relevant viewpoints?
  • How is your point relevant to the issue we are addressing?
  • What facts are actually going to help us answer the question? What considerations should be set aside?
  • Does this truly bear on the question? How does it connect?

3. Question Questions

 

Be on the lookout for questions. The ones we ask. The ones we fail to ask. Look on the surface. Look beneath the surface. Listen to how people question, when they question, when they fail to question. Look closely at the questions asked. What questions do you ask, should you ask? Examine the extent to which you are a questioner, or simply one who accepts the definitions of situations given by others.

 

Most people are not skilled questioners. Most accept the world as it is presented to them. And when they do question, their questions are often superficial or “loaded.” Their questions do not help them solve their problems or make better decisions. Good thinkers routinely ask questions in order to understand and effectively deal with the world around them. They question the status quo. They know that things are often different from the way they are presented. Their questions penetrate images, masks, fronts, and propaganda. Their questions make real problems explicit and discipline their thinking through those problems. If you become a student of questions, you can learn to ask powerful questions that lead to a deeper and more fulfilling life. Your questions become more basic, essential, and deep.

 

More at:  Becoming a Critic Of Your Thinking

 

One poster claims they actually changed political parties because the posters he considered were a part of the his party, not the party itself, disagreed with his views on religious discrimination and his desire for the Confederate Battle flag.  Rather odd considering he never agreed with the other party previously.

 

There are other posters here who don't post as often as they used to; they often claim they don't like others disagreeing with them; they didn't want to argue, as if that was the only outcome.  (it's takes two to argue_  It's sad they just want to post their opinion and don't want to be challenged on anything, so the stay way.  It's sad to see mature adults so obstinate in their views that they want to say what they like, but don't ever challenge them or ask them to think critically, or explain their view.  Haven't these folks already given up being objective and open-minded?

 

It's wise and smart to have one's views challenged.  It helps one develop an open-minded thought process and facilitates their personal growth, especially their mental growth and vitality.  This is something we can all use as we age.  It's when we stop growing, that we already have one foot in the grave.

 

What are your thoughts?

 

 


"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in Washington DC, January 21, 2017.
Report Inappropriate Content
6
Kudos
435
Views
14
Replies
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Users
Announcements

Now until February 11, play this classic game online at AARP. Get in the game and play now.


jeopardy for aarp logo

Top Authors