Stuck in the past and present; some cannot see the future

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Re: Stuck in the past and present; some cannot see the future

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@Olderscout66 wrote:

Tesla's tremendous financial success is very good news, but at the end of the day, ya gotta plug it in to recharge. Where that recharge comes from may eventually be entirely renewable, but not until we figure out a better storage mechinism and a MUCH better electric grid. In the meantime, why not replace the coal fired furnaces with clean, safe Nuclear reactors like the one that we demonstrated as totally fail-safe back on April 26, 1986 - a reactor that re-uses IN HOUSE 80% of the radioactive waste a "boiling water" reactor produces. We have the technology NOW, unlike the storage devices for wind and solar.

 

If you can't get your head around totally safe Nuclear, how about we declare energy independence an essential part of National Defense, and use a couple billion from DOD to perfect and install the "low-head hydro" generators in all our major rivers? These puppies don't require a dam, but DO require some serious Government support to get to their full potential ASAP. After all, Ike used DOD to fund half of the InterState system.


There is much to what you say. However, it can never be sold politically. Unfortunately, "way back when" nuclear power got emotionally connected to "ban the bomb" and to this day I am afraid it cannot be fully separated.

 

As to getting DOD involved, I disagree. We have other Federal agencies concerned with such things and too many cooks in the kitchen screws up the lasagna. However, I am all for new technologies coming on board once they are viable.

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Re: Stuck in the past and present; some cannot see the future

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Tesla's tremendous financial success is very good news, but at the end of the day, ya gotta plug it in to recharge. Where that recharge comes from may eventually be entirely renewable, but not until we figure out a better storage mechinism and a MUCH better electric grid. In the meantime, why not replace the coal fired furnaces with clean, safe Nuclear reactors like the one that we demonstrated as totally fail-safe back on April 26, 1986 - a reactor that re-uses IN HOUSE 80% of the radioactive waste a "boiling water" reactor produces. We have the technology NOW, unlike the storage devices for wind and solar.

 

If you can't get your head around totally safe Nuclear, how about we declare energy independence an essential part of National Defense, and use a couple billion from DOD to perfect and install the "low-head hydro" generators in all our major rivers? These puppies don't require a dam, but DO require some serious Government support to get to their full potential ASAP. After all, Ike used DOD to fund half of the InterState system.

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Re: Stuck in the past and present; some cannot see the future

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   LESS Regulation=more days in which people (including children) with Asthma and older individuals with COPD will be homebound because of increase in pollution.   

 

     Are some really willing to make the US air quality to look like China?   

 

     This roll-back can also dramatically increase the visit by some to Emergency Centers for treatment - which is the most expensive type of healthcare.      If healthcare insurance revamp is so expensive that people will be unable to afford insurance, then the taxpayer will end up paying that bill.

 

      The lower tax  policy group will then have to either let these people die or cut services that private citizens really do care about, even simple stuff, like potholes.  

 

       It is time to make people understand that what makes a  "good soundbite" has consequences that some are hoping that voters will ignore.      Rancher's in TX are hopping mad at the idea that Fed wants to take their land.   (those who are unfamiliar with TX - these are rural area farmers that generally vote (R).   

PRO-LIFE is Affordable Healthcare for ALL .
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Re: Stuck in the past and present; some cannot see the future

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@easyed598 wrote:

lk152- wroteed, take your eyes off the rear view mirror and look ahead. A major problem in "coal country" is that exports of coal are way down from what they have been previously. A lot of coal was exported to China and Asia, but with the new development in renewable energy, many Asian nations have become more dependent on renewable energy and have imported less coal from the United States. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------We are exporting lots of coal to Asia and many of our domestic coal plants are converting to natural gas but the coal is still there and will be mined whether we use it or not.Having a 100 year backup source of energy is always a good thing.


Yes...the coal is STILL there.  IF coal is mined it is no longer 'there'.   Mine enough, it goes away altogether and is no longer a resource.  ONLY IF alternative energy sources are available to replace it does depleting a resource make sense in the long run.  You presume and your reasoning is flawed. 

 

You say, "coal will be mined whether we use it or not".   IF we don't "use it", mining 'it' presumes others WILL use it AND 'they' will pay enough to make it possible to mine, remediate the consequences of that process, factor in ALL transportation, incidentals associated with that entire process and still show a profit.  Without incorporating a hidden tax-payer subsidy, of course. 

 

You also presume that the citizens of the United States will incur NO incidental expense from 'others' using coal for fuel. Absolutely untrue.  IF you don't know that, you should.  IF you do know and say it anyway, well...that's a deliberate untruth.

 

Perhaps you can tell us all just how in blue-billy-hell a "100 year back-up source of energy" that shouldn't be used today at all is "a good thing" when it isn't even there anymore?   

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easyed598:  We are exporting lots of coal to Asia and many of our domestic coal plants are converting to natural gas but the coal is still there and will be mined whether we use it or not.Having a 100 year backup source of energy is always a good thing.

 

Ed, what good is your 100 year back up of coal going to do us since we will fairly soon have no coal fired plants? They are either already gone or are slated to be shut down. This thinking is like clinging to using whale oil after the advent of kerosene.

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We are exporting lots of coal to Asia and many of our domestic coal plants are converting to natural gas but the coal is still there and will be mined whether we use it or not.Having a 100 year backup source of energy is always a good thing.

"Lots" but less every year.  "Coal is still out there" but this arguement sounds remarkably like what the buggy industry must have said. 

 

Trump can keep the United States from moving forward on energy for a while. It is one of the many ways he will hurt the county as other countries (China) move into the future and he holds us in the past.  

 

I see he finally hired the second to Tillerson in the State Department aftert 100 days. The man could not run a McDonald's if he did not inherit it from his father. 

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Re: Stuck in the past and present; some cannot see the future

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lk152- wroteed, take your eyes off the rear view mirror and look ahead. A major problem in "coal country" is that exports of coal are way down from what they have been previously. A lot of coal was exported to China and Asia, but with the new development in renewable energy, many Asian nations have become more dependent on renewable energy and have imported less coal from the United States. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------We are exporting lots of coal to Asia and many of our domestic coal plants are converting to natural gas but the coal is still there and will be mined whether we use it or not.Having a 100 year backup source of energy is always a good thing.

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Re: Stuck in the past and present; some cannot see the future

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lk152: 

The major problems with the United States is that our political system is too much mired in the present and looking to the past rather than anticipating and working toward the future.

 

The United States will pay dearly for this mistake. It would take a long time to correct the mistakes made by the Trump adminstration. 

 

Very true. The problem we have is that our future is being dictated by whoever has captured congress with money (right now it's the fossil fuel industry). Our congress is making decisions about our future based on the whims of  who is donating to their campaigns, not about what direction is best for America. This is going to allow China to capture what could be ours, since they have the freedom to do whatever they need to do instead of  being dragged backwards by bought and paid for politicians. We desperately need to get money out of our politics if we want to remain a world leader.

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ed, take your eyes off the rear view mirror and look ahead. A major problem in "coal country" is that exports of coal are way down from what they have been previously. A lot of coal was exported to China and Asia, but with the new development in renewable energy, many Asian nations have become more dependent on renewable energy and have imported less coal from the United States. 

 

As far as coal fired power plants, those will soon be history. Coal fired plants are either being converted to natural gas, which thanks to fracking, is not only cheaper than coal; but much cleaner and more efficient. There is no going back to coal. An old coal fired power plant here in Cleveland was shut down four years ago and sat empty. Now it is being torn down. It was an old plant that was not able to be converted to natural gas. 

 

Burning coal for fuel causes many environmental problems. Not only does the burning of coal release toxins in the air and requires the use of costly scrubbers to eliminate a lot of those toxins make burning coal more costly. In addition the ash left over after the coal has been burned has to be disposed. There is distinct link between inhaling fly ash from coal and cancer. These issues don't even include the environmental hazards with the mining and extraction of coal. 

 

There is no way that the United States is going back to coal as a fuel and many developing nations are finding that developing renewable energy is much cheaper and cleaner than using coal. Face it, coal is through as a major source of energy and the sooner that the United States realizes this, then the better our country will become. 

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panjandrum, your post is spot on. Unless the United States makes some systemic changes as far as outlook and politically, by mid century China will be cleaning our clocks internationally. The Chinese will not only have taken the lead in science, research and development but in economic and financial leadership in the world. 

 

The major problems with the United States is that our political system is too much mired in the present and looking to the past rather than anticipating and working toward the future. The future is in renewable energy and President Obama could realize that and took giant steps to position the United States to become a leader in renewable energy. But Donald Trump and congressional Republicans are so indebeted to the fossil fuel industry and their money that they are reversing the progress that the Obama administration has made. 

 

The United States will pay dearly for this mistake. It would take a long time to correct the mistakes made by the Trump adminstration. 

 

This isn't the first time that the United States made the mistake of pulling away from the government backing scientific research and development. Back around 1970, the Nixon administration made significant cuts in the budget for scientific research and development. After we put a man on the moon, many felt that it was a waste of money to explore space and as a result NASA's budget was slashed and the future lunar explorations were cancelled after the Apollo 17 in 1972. NASA wound up laying off a third of their scientists and engineers in 1970. In addition many graduate students lost their grants and funding. 

 

The result of all this was a glut of scientists and graduate students on the job market in the early 1970s. I was a young college graduate in 1970 with a Bachelor's degree looking for a job competing with laid off rocket scientists and graduate students now on the job market. 

 

Another result of this government pull back from research and development was that the semi conductor research and development, which was in its infancy back in the early 1970s moved from the United States to Japan and Germany. Japanese companies picked up the slack left by American companies who exited that when their government support was cut off. As a result the United States lost its lead in semi conductor research and development to Japan for most of the 1970s and into the 1980s. 

 

The Reagan administration restored a lot of this with their defense build up and the military applications of such technology and by the end of the 1980s, the United States had recaptured the lead. But we still had to play catch up and the loss of many good paying jobs in that industry was surrendered to Japan in the 1970s. 

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