When it comes to your workout, there are good reasons not to go it alone. Check out the benefits of exercise buddies.

Reply
Valued Social Butterfly
2
Kudos
174
Views

Re: Scott Pruitt Will End EPA’s Use Of ‘Secret Science’ To Justify Regulations

174 Views
Message 21 of 22

@jimc91wrote:

 

http://dailycaller.com/2018/03/19/epa-scott-pruitt-secret-science/

 

Hey Folks,

 

Disinformation and deception is all you will get from this well known controversial site.

 

Remember:

 

(1) IT WAS FOUNDED BY DICK CHENEY'S FORMER ADVISOR;

(2) IT WAS FUNDED BY A GUY THAT SAYS WOMEN SHOULD PRACTICE BIRTH CONTROL BY PUTTING A BAYER ASPIRIN BETWEEN THEIR KNEES;

(3) IT RAN A VIDEO FOR MONTHS THAT GAVE ADVICE ON HOW TO RUN DOWN LIBERAL DEMONSTRATORS AT A RALLY UNTIL IT ACTUALLY HAPPENED (then they removed it)

(4) IT RAN ARTICLE AFTER ARTICLE BY JASON KESSLER, A WELL KNOWN WHITE SUPREMACIST. IN FACT, HE'S THE GUY THAT ORGANIZED THE CHARLOTTESVILLE RALLY WHERE THE CAR WAS USED AS A MURDER WEAPON.

 

Yes, with a resume like that how can you go wrong in believing what they publish.

 

Brought to you in the spirit of transparency.

 

 

Report Inappropriate Content
2
Kudos
174
Views
Highlighted
Treasured Social Butterfly
0
Kudos
179
Views
21
Replies

Scott Pruitt Will End EPA’s Use Of ‘Secret Science’ To Justify Regulations

179 Views
Message 22 of 22

EXCLUSIVE: Scott Pruitt Will End EPA’s Use Of ‘Secret Science’ To Justify Regulations

 
MICHAEL BASTASCH
 
  Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Scott Pruitt will soon end his agency’s use of “secret science” to craft regulations.
 

“We need to make sure their data and methodology are published as part of the record,” Pruitt said in an exclusive interview with The Daily Caller News Foundation. “Otherwise, it’s not transparent. It’s not objectively measured, and that’s important.”

 

Pruitt will reverse long-standing EPA policy allowing regulators to rely on non-public scientific data in crafting rules. Such studies have been used to justify tens of billions of dollars worth of regulations.

 

EPA regulators would only be allowed to consider scientific studies that make their data available for public scrutiny under Pruitt’s new policy. Also, EPA-funded studies would need to make all their data public.

 

“When we do contract that science out, sometimes the findings are published; we make that part of our rule-making processes, but then we don’t publish the methodology and data that went into those findings because the third party who did the study won’t give it to us,” Pruitt added.

 

“And we’ve said that’s fine — we’re changing that as well,” Pruitt told TheDCNF.

 

Conservatives have long criticized EPA for relying on scientific studies that published their findings but not the underlying data. However, Democrats and environmental activists have challenged past attempts to bring transparency to studies used in rule making.

 

Texas Republican Rep. Lamar Smith pushed legislation to end the use of what he calls “secret science” at EPA. Pruitt instituted another policy in 2017 backed by Smith against EPA-funded scientists serving on agency advisory boards.

 

“If we use a third party to engage in scientific review or inquiry, and that’s the basis of rulemaking, you and every American citizen across the country deserve to know what’s the data, what’s the methodology that was used to reach that conclusion that was the underpinning of what — rules that were adopted by this agency,” Pruitt explained.

 

Pruitt’s pending science transparency policy mirrors Smith’s HONEST Act, which passed the House in March 2017. Smith’s office was pleased to hear Pruitt was adopting another policy the House Committee on Science, Space and Technology chairman championed.

 

“The chairman has long worked toward a more open and transparent rule-making process at EPA, and he looks forward to any announcement from Administrator Pruitt that would achieve that goal,” committee spokeswoman Thea McDonald told TheDCNF.

 

Junk science crusader Steve Milloy also called on EPA to end its use of “secret science” in rule making, especially when it comes to studies on the toxicity of fine particulates in the air.

 

EPA has primarily relied on two 1990s studies linking fine particulate pollution to premature death. Neither studies have made their data public, but EPA used their findings to justify sweeping air quality regulations.

 

Reported benefits from EPA rules are “mostly attributable to the reduction in public exposure to fine particulate matter,” according to the White House Office of Management and Budget report. That’s equivalent to billions of dollars.

 

In fact, one of EPA’s most expensive regulation on the books, called MATS, derived most of its estimated benefits from reducing particulates not from reducing mercury, which the rule was ostensibly crafted to address.

 

EPA estimated MATS would cost $8.2 billion but yield between $28 billion to $77 billion in public health benefits. It’s a similar story for the Clean Power Plan, which EPA estimated would cost $8.4 billion and yield from $14 billion to $34 billion in health and climate benefits.

 

Democrats and environmentalists have largely opposed attempts to require EPA rely on transparent scientific data. Said data would restrict the amount of studies EPA can use, but a major objection is making data public would reveal confidential patient data, opponents argue.

 

“A lot of the data that EPA uses to protect public health and ensure that we have clean air and clean water relies on data that cannot be publicly released,” Union of Concerned Scientists representative Yogin Kothari told E&E News.

 

“It really hamstrings the ability of the EPA to do anything, to fulfill its mission,” Kothari said.

Milloy, however, countered and argued it’s a “red herring” to claim that forcing regulators to use public science data would harm patient privacy.

 

“The availability of such data sets is nothing new,” said Milloy, publisher of JunkScience.com and senior fellow at the Energy and Environmental Legal Institute.

 

“The state of California, for example, makes such data available under the moniker, ‘Public Use Death Files,'” Milloy said. “We used such data in the form of over two million anonymized death certificates in our recent California study on particulates and death.”

 

“Opponents of data transparency are just trying to hide the data from independent scrutiny,” Milloy added. “But the studies that use this data are taxpayer-financed, and they are used to regulate the public.”

 

http://dailycaller.com/2018/03/19/epa-scott-pruitt-secret-science/

 

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

A little common sense is a most welcome stranger to this agency!

 

 

 

 

 

VIMTSTL
Report Inappropriate Content
Tags (1)
0
Kudos
179
Views
21
Replies