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Re: Russia's Twitter disinformation campaign far more extensive than previously known: study

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@Tom5678 wrote:
the only discord I see here Jim are your posts trying to pin the blame on Mueller. Really sad.

Consider reading this about what is coming out now about the Mueller Report...

 

Snipit:

 

In a key finding of the Mueller report, Ukrainian businessman Konstantin Kilimnik, who worked for Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort, is tied to Russian intelligence.

 

But hundreds of pages of government documents — which special counsel Robert Mueller possessed since 2018 — describe Kilimnik as a “sensitive” intelligence source for the U.S. State Department who informed on Ukrainian and Russian matters.

Why Mueller’s team omitted that part of the Kilimnik narrative from its report and related court filings is not known. But the revelation of it comes as the accuracy of Mueller’s Russia conclusions face increased scrutiny.

 

READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE HERE:

 

 

 

 

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Re: Russia's Twitter disinformation campaign far more extensive than previously known: study

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the only discord I see here Jim are your posts trying to pin the blame on Mueller. Really sad.
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Re: Russia's Twitter disinformation campaign far more extensive than previously known: study

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@ChasKy53 wrote:

@jimc91 wrote:

"Once the data was made public, it quickly became obvious that in order to achieve its goal, the campaign directed propaganda at both sides of the liberal/conservative political divide in the U.S., in particular the more disaffected elements of both camps," Symantec wrote. "The main objective of the campaign instead appeared to be sowing discord by attempting to inflame opinions on both sides."

 


Well Jimc91 ......... show us some examples of Russian generated anti-trump postings on social media.


Do your own research.  Start here:  https://www.symantec.com/blogs/threat-intelligence/twitterbots-propaganda-disinformation

 

 

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Re: Russia's Twitter disinformation campaign far more extensive than previously known: study

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@jimc91 wrote:

"Once the data was made public, it quickly became obvious that in order to achieve its goal, the campaign directed propaganda at both sides of the liberal/conservative political divide in the U.S., in particular the more disaffected elements of both camps," Symantec wrote. "The main objective of the campaign instead appeared to be sowing discord by attempting to inflame opinions on both sides."

 


Well Jimc91 ......... show us some examples of Russian generated anti-trump postings on social media.


"The only thing man learns from history is man learns nothing from history"
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"Once the data was made public, it quickly became obvious that in order to achieve its goal, the campaign directed propaganda at both sides of the liberal/conservative political divide in the U.S., in particular the more disaffected elements of both camps," Symantec wrote. "The main objective of the campaign instead appeared to be sowing discord by attempting to inflame opinions on both sides."

 

 

 

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Re: Russia's Twitter disinformation campaign far more extensive than previously known: study

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@jimc91 wrote:

Russia’s campaign to sway American public opinion on social media during the 2016 campaign was more calculated, far-reaching and sophisticated than previously known, according to a study released Wednesday.

 

U.S. cybersecurity firm Symantec says the Internet Research Agency, a Russian troll farm with links to the Kremlin, carried out "a highly professional campaign" that was "incredibly successful at pushing out and amplifying its messages.”

 

"While this propaganda campaign has often been referred to as the work of trolls, the release of the dataset makes it obvious that it was far more than that," the firm wrote. "It was planned months in advance and the operators had the resources to create and manage a vast disinformation network." 

 

Researchers reviewed almost 4,000 accounts and 10 million tweets that Twitter released last year amid scrutiny of Moscow’s efforts to meddle in the 2016 presidential race.

 

The study concluded that the Internet Research Agency conducted a carefully calculated operation that sought to inflame tensions on both sides of the ideological divide, rather than the previous assumptions that its posts were targeting just one side of the political spectrum.

 

"Once the data was made public, it quickly became obvious that in order to achieve its goal, the campaign directed propaganda at both sides of the liberal/conservative political divide in the U.S., in particular the more disaffected elements of both camps," Symantec wrote. "The main objective of the campaign instead appeared to be sowing discord by attempting to inflame opinions on both sides."

 

In some cases, accounts were set up months in advance before they were used — long before the 2016 election. There was an average of 177 days between the creation of an account and its first tweet, Symantec said.

 

The firm also found that while the majority of the accounts were automated, the Internet Research Agency manually intervened at times to post original content or tweak the wording of reposted content. Symantec said the approach appeared to be an attempt to make the posts look more authentic.

 

"Fake news accounts were set up to monitor blog activity and automatically push new blog posts to Twitter. Auxiliary accounts were configured to retweet content pushed out by the main accounts," the firm said.

 

The company warned that there is a risk such an operation could be repeated in future election cycles.

 

"The sheer scale and impact of this propaganda campaign is obviously of deep concern to voters in all countries, who may fear a repeat of what happened in the lead-up to the U.S. presidential election in 2016," Symantec wrote. "A growing awareness of the disinformation campaigns may help blunt their impact in future."

 

Special counsel Robert Mueller, who outlined the Internet Research Agency's activities in his report, brought charges last year against the troll farm and a dozen Russian nationals for interfering with the 2016 U.S. elections.

 

https://thehill.com/policy/cybersecurity/447063-russias-twitter-disinformation-campaign-was-far-more...

 

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++=

 

And the dimms and never Trumpers are continuing to sow the discord...

 

 

 

 


You better read you support article again. It tells how Russia worked both sides to get Trump elected. That is a fact that has been out there for months. The Russian even used the Black Lives matter group, and far right gun group in their efforts. They had rallies set up by each group about a block from each other in the same city. They told the consv. group to bring their firearms as it was a open carry state. This story was on TV by the Black Lives matter organizer they duped. He told us just what they did and how they sucked him in.

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Well, a good start would be to have the candidate they are supporting withdraw from the race.

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Re: Russia's Twitter disinformation campaign far more extensive than previously known: study

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What do Russian disinformation campaigns look like, and how can we protect our elections?

 

As technological capabilities progress, the threat of political warfare is becoming an even more serious threat to democratic elections. David M. Rubenstein Fellow Alina Polyakova analyzes past disinformation campaigns and political warfare tools employed by hostile foreign actors in Russia and elsewhere. She also discusses how these tactics are influencing U.S. midterm and other elections and what the U.S. can do to protect its electoral system.

 

What you need to know:

  • One of the goals of Russian information warfare is to create a society in which we can’t tell the difference between fact and fiction.
  • The Russian government is becoming more sophisticated in mastering the tools of political warfare for the digital age. This includes the use of bots, trolls, microtargeting to spread disinformation.
  • The strategies are not new but the digital tools are.
  • Over the next few months we are going to see more disinformation campaigns, including fake websites that work together as a network to spread disinformation, fake personalities and entities on Twitter and Facebook, and manipulation of social media networks’ algorithms, including Google, YouTube, and others. And we’re not really paying enough attention to algorithmic manipulation.
  • The more frightening development that we are likely to see in the next 12-16 months is the use of artificial intelligence to enhance the tools of political warfare.
  • Right now, humans control and produce online entities like bots and trolls. But soon, disinformation campaigns will become more automated, smarter, and more difficult to detect. AI driven disinformation will be better targeted to specific audiences; AI driven online entities will be able to predict and manipulate human responses; At some point very soon, we won’t be able to tell the difference between automated accounts and human entities.
  • The phenomena of deep fakes—fake video and audio that appears convincingly real – is going to be used by malicious actors to mislead and deceive us. Debunking this content will be like playing whack-a-mole. This is going to become a reality much sooner than we’re comfortable with.
  • Democratic societies, including the United States, can do many things to inoculate themselves against these kinds of tools of political warfare, disinformation, and cyberattacks.
  • Step one is getting the U.S. government to develop a strategy of deterrence when it comes to political warfare.
  • We currently don’t have such a strategy, because we diluted or dissolved the institutions and capabilities we had during the Cold War.
  • Step two is acknowledging individuals’ responsibility to be more critical consumers of information and recognizing that the information we consume is not neutral but often manipulated by malicious actors. As citizens, we have a responsibility to be more discerning and aware.

 

https://www.brookings.edu/blog/brookings-now/2018/10/03/what-do-russian-disinformation-campaigns-loo...

 

 

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Twitter released a data set of reportedly Russian-controlled disinformation actors totaling 3,900 accounts and 10 million tweets in October 2018. Analyzed by Symantec, research shows accounts took on average 177 days from creation to actually tweeting, a number underlining the patience in planning that went into the campaign.

 

 

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Russia's Twitter disinformation campaign far more extensive than previously known: study

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Russia’s campaign to sway American public opinion on social media during the 2016 campaign was more calculated, far-reaching and sophisticated than previously known, according to a study released Wednesday.

 

U.S. cybersecurity firm Symantec says the Internet Research Agency, a Russian troll farm with links to the Kremlin, carried out "a highly professional campaign" that was "incredibly successful at pushing out and amplifying its messages.”

 

"While this propaganda campaign has often been referred to as the work of trolls, the release of the dataset makes it obvious that it was far more than that," the firm wrote. "It was planned months in advance and the operators had the resources to create and manage a vast disinformation network." 

 

Researchers reviewed almost 4,000 accounts and 10 million tweets that Twitter released last year amid scrutiny of Moscow’s efforts to meddle in the 2016 presidential race.

 

The study concluded that the Internet Research Agency conducted a carefully calculated operation that sought to inflame tensions on both sides of the ideological divide, rather than the previous assumptions that its posts were targeting just one side of the political spectrum.

 

"Once the data was made public, it quickly became obvious that in order to achieve its goal, the campaign directed propaganda at both sides of the liberal/conservative political divide in the U.S., in particular the more disaffected elements of both camps," Symantec wrote. "The main objective of the campaign instead appeared to be sowing discord by attempting to inflame opinions on both sides."

 

In some cases, accounts were set up months in advance before they were used — long before the 2016 election. There was an average of 177 days between the creation of an account and its first tweet, Symantec said.

 

The firm also found that while the majority of the accounts were automated, the Internet Research Agency manually intervened at times to post original content or tweak the wording of reposted content. Symantec said the approach appeared to be an attempt to make the posts look more authentic.

 

"Fake news accounts were set up to monitor blog activity and automatically push new blog posts to Twitter. Auxiliary accounts were configured to retweet content pushed out by the main accounts," the firm said.

 

The company warned that there is a risk such an operation could be repeated in future election cycles.

 

"The sheer scale and impact of this propaganda campaign is obviously of deep concern to voters in all countries, who may fear a repeat of what happened in the lead-up to the U.S. presidential election in 2016," Symantec wrote. "A growing awareness of the disinformation campaigns may help blunt their impact in future."

 

Special counsel Robert Mueller, who outlined the Internet Research Agency's activities in his report, brought charges last year against the troll farm and a dozen Russian nationals for interfering with the 2016 U.S. elections.

 

https://thehill.com/policy/cybersecurity/447063-russias-twitter-disinformation-campaign-was-far-more...

 

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++=

 

And the dimms and never Trumpers are continuing to sow the discord...

 

 

 

 

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