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Treasured Social Butterfly
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Re: Protest – As American as Apple Pie

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Message 11 of 13

@rk9152 wrote:

The true story:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MXL9-YE2Fo0


The value of the tea in today's money that was thrown into Boston Harbor and destroyed on December 16, 1773 - is at least $1,700,000.

 

Both the three ships and the tea were privately owned - strictly destruction of private property.

 

It was referred to as the "destruction of the tea" until 1825, when it was first called "the tea party"...

 

The Sons of Liberty didn't have a permit for that - nor was any permit applied for...

 

There was no permit for the protest that turned into the riot of Aug 26, 1765 that resulted in the destruction of a great many things - including British Lieutenant Governor Thomas Hutchinson's home.

 

Today's trump-suckers would soil their lace panties were an act of patriotically motivated destruction of private property of oligarchs to occur today...

 

 

He (tRump) is useless on top of the ground - he should be under it - inspiring the cabbages...
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Re: Protest – As American as Apple Pie

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Message 12 of 13
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Protest – As American as Apple Pie

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Message 13 of 13

In December of 1773 a group of Bostonians, upset about the British imposing a higher tax on tea and fueled by whisky and beer dressed as native Americans and boarded several ships in Boston Harbor that were bringing tea to Boston. They then dumped the tea into Boston Harbor in protest of the tea tax in what became known as the Boston Tea Party.

 

Of course, the British saw the Boston Tea Party differently. They saw it as vandalism and perhaps insurrection. In response the British government over reacted and imposed a blockade of Boston harbor, effectively strangling the economy of Massachusetts. In addition, the British sent in more troops to maintain order and punish those who dumped the tea into Boston Harbor. These “Intolerable Acts” helped inflame passions and led to the revolution that began in1775. Instead of over reacting, had the British responded to the underlying grievance of the colonists, many who thought that those who dumped the tea into Boston harbor were a bunch of drunken hooligans; perhaps the course of history might have been different.

 

But what went unnoticed by so many was a much quieter and far more effective protest against the tax on tea. That protest was that Americans began drinking a new beverage called coffee which was being imported from plantations in the Caribbean and processed in the colonies. After the Intolerable Acts were imposed by Great Britain on Massachusetts, drinking tea was unpatriotic so Americans began drinking coffee. Now, 244 years after the Boston tea party, Americans are still coffee drinkers more than tea drinkers.

 

In December 1955, a tired seamstress in Montgomery Alabama refused to give up her seat on a bus to a white man, as was the law and custom in the south. Rosa Parks was arrested and thrown in jail for her act of insubordination. Her act caught the attention of a young preacher in who organized a boycott and protest of the bus service in Montgomery. That young preacher, Martin Luther King Jr. was thrust on to the national stage as a spokesman for the cause of civil rights. His house was fire bombed by the KKK, but he persisted despite attempts to silence him. That protest by African Americans against the Montgomery Transit Company almost drove the company bankrupt and a year later, the transit company settled and the Jim Crow system in the south began to crack.

 

In 1967, I was a college student at Kent State University and an Air Force ROTC cadet when students began protesting a war in Vietnam. At first, the protests were nothing more than silent vigils outside the student union for peace in Vietnam. The protesters were called “communists” and cowards. They were heckled and garbage was thrown at them. But as the war dragged on with no end in sight and more Americans were being killed fighting an enemy we didn’t understand; more people began protesting the war in Vietnam.

 

Fast forward to the 21st century and when a few NFL players decide to protest police shootings of unarmed black men by kneeling silently during the playing of the national anthem before the game. Some people act like it is an act of insurrection, just as the British did 244 years ago when colonists dumped tea in the Boston harbor. Even the President called for those athletes to be fired and one NFL owner threatened to bench any players who “took a knee” during the national anthem.

 

But such actions are having the opposite effect. Instead of addressing the underlying issue of the protest, the President and some NFL owners are fanning the flames of protest. But peaceful protest is protected in the constitution. Even protesting by burning the American flag has been ruled as protected free speech by the Supreme Court.

 

This country was literally founded on protests. Progress has been made because a few brave people decided to protest injustice, unfair taxation or a senseless war. We should realize that living in a nation where freedom of speech and expression is enshrined in our constitution may sometimes make us uncomfortable. But that is the price of freedom and progress. As Martin Luther King Jr. once said “the arc of history eventually bends toward justice”. The President as well as those who are saying that the protesting athletes should be benched or fired are the ones who are “anti-American” and on the wrong side of history.

 

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