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Treasured Social Butterfly
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Re: Police Get Warrant for Everyone Who Googled A Name

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There is always yahoo or dogpile to do your searches.

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Super Social Butterfly
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Re: Police Get Warrant for Everyone Who Googled A Name

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wait, what? 

 

"In addition to basic contact information for people targeted by the warrant, Google is being asked to provide Edina police with their Social Security numbers, account and payment information, and IP (internet protocol) and MAC (media access control) addresses."

 

First, even though I use google wallet, they do NOT have my SSN (I would think the DA (district attorney, not dumb a**) that drew up the warrant request would know that), nor could google release that IF they had it (there is some obscure antiquated law about that); nor do they have my payment info other than registered card # (in this case prepaid anonymous Visa) not bank info)...

 

IP anyone can get and if they are savvy enough can backtrack... MAC? nope; unless you're on a public non-secured network (e.g. Starbucks) or registered MACs with gov agency...

 

 

Phil Harris, actor and showman, to John Fogerty of CCR: “If I’d known I’d live this long, I’d have taken better care of myself.”
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Treasured Social Butterfly
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Police Get Warrant for Everyone Who Googled A Name

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Police got search warrant for everyone who Googled Edina resident's name

 

Google said Friday that it objected "to this overreaching request for user data, and if needed, will fight it in court."

 

A search warrant issued to Edina police to collect information on anyone who used certain search terms on Google is raising concerns about constitutional violations.

 

Privacy law experts say that the warrant — issued to find a suspect in an attempted identity and credit theft of an Edina resident — is based on an unusually broad definition of probable cause that could set a troubling precedent.

 

"This kind of warrant is cause for concern because it's closer to these dragnet searches that the Fourth Amendment is designed to prevent," said William McGeveran, a law professor at the University of Minnesota.

 

Issued by Hennepin County District Judge Gary Larson in early February, the warrant looks at anyone who searched variations of the resident's name on Google from Dec. 1 through Jan. 7.

In addition to basic contact information for people targeted by the warrant, Google is being asked to provide Edina police with their Social Security numbers, account and payment information, and IP (internet protocol) and MAC (media access control) addresses.

 

A spokesperson for Google, which received the warrant, said Friday: "We will continue to object to this overreaching request for user data, and if needed, will fight it in court. We always push back when we receive excessively broad requests for data about our users."

 

Information on the warrant first emerged through a blog post by public records researcher Tony Webster. Technology website Ars Technica called the Edina warrant "perhaps the most expansive one we've seen unconnected to the U.S. national security apparatus."

 

Google had initially denied a subpoena to provide the same information to Edina. Police declined to comment Friday on the warrant, saying it is part of an ongoing investigation.

 

more at:  Police got search warrant for everyone who Googled Edina resident's name

 


"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in Washington DC, January 21, 2017.
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