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Valued Social Butterfly
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Re: Police Body Worn Cameras: A Policy Scorecard

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    As I observe people calling others "cop haters" when they abuse law-abiding citizens, they need to understand that cameras do work.

 

    http://fox17online.com/2018/03/12/north-carolina-officer-faces-felony-charges-after-arrest-of-jaywal...

 

    Please note the final statement of the cop.....so that is exactly what most people are complaining about.  

 

   

t began around midnight on Aug. 25 when officer Christopher Hickman and a police trainee stopped 33-year-old Johnnie Jermaine Rush in Asheville and accused him of jaywalking and trespassing through a parking lot, reports the Asheville Citizen-Times. Rush explained he just got off work. “You ain’t got nothing better to do besides mess with me?” he asked, per ABC News.

Video from a body camera worn by Hickman, who is white, shows Rush running away after Hickman’s order to put his hands behind his back. As Rush runs, the officer says, “You know what’s funny is you’re going to get f—– up hardcore.”

In the ensuing altercation, Hickman is seen repeatedly punching Rush in the face, as Rush says, “I can’t breathe.” Hickman also uses a stun gun on Rush, who at one point has another person’s hands on his throat, per the Citizen-Times. “I beat the s— out of his head. I’m not going to lie about that,” Hickman later says.

 

PRO-LIFE is Affordable Healthcare for ALL .
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Valued Social Butterfly
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Re: Police Body Worn Cameras: A Policy Scorecard

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@Centristsin2010wrote:

 

Much, much more at:  Police Body Worn Cameras: A Policy Scorecard


Thank you, sir.  A much needed post illustrating a rational approach to a real problem.  Perhaps others can see fit to follow your lead in this matter.  That way a rational solution can be found.  Otherwise we will continue to 'talk past each other' and demagogue as a means to advocate a position.  

 

I don't think everyone understands that a 'tribal' culture within a culture can evolve into a 'tribal culture' at odds with whole sectors of the larger community.  That 'tribal culture' may be at odds with their original stated purpose as well.  It didn't start out as an 'Us vs. Them' attitude, but that's the way it turned out.  It happens.  No perjoratives just an observation of a truth.

 

 

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Treasured Social Butterfly
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Police Body Worn Cameras: A Policy Scorecard

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Police Body Worn Cameras: A Policy Scorecard Purpose

 

In the wake of high-profile incidents in Ferguson, Staten Island, North Charleston, Baltimore, and elsewhere, law enforcement agencies across the country have rapidly adopted body-worn cameras for their officers. One of the main selling points for these cameras is their potential to provide transparency into some police interactions, and to help protect civil rights, especially in heavily policed communities of color.

 

But accountability is not automatic. Whether these cameras make police more accountable — or simply intensify police surveillance of communities — depends on how the cameras and footage are used. That’s why The Leadership Conference, together with a broad coalition of civil rights, privacy, and media rights groups, developed shared Civil Rights Principles on Body Worn Cameras. Our principles emphasize that “[w]ithout carefully crafted policy safeguards in place, there is a real risk that these new devices could become instruments of injustice, rather than tools for accountability.”

 

This scorecard evaluates the body-worn camera policies currently in place in major police departments across the country. Our goal is to highlight promising approaches that some departments are taking, and to identify opportunities where departments could improve their policies.

 

Methodology

 

When we initially released our scorecard in November 2015, we examined the body-worn camera policies from 25 local police departments. Since then, we’ve expanded our scorecard to 75 departments, covering all major city police departments in the country that have equipped — or will soon equip — their officers with body cameras.1 We also added departments that have received more than $500,000 in DOJ grant funding to support their camera programs (as indicated on the scorecard).2 In addition, we included Baton Rouge (LA) and Ferguson (MO) because of the national attention they have received after recent events, and Parker (CO) because of the promising policies they have adopted.

 

The policy landscape is shifting rapidly: Since our initial release, many departments have updated their policies multiple times based on their early experiences, and others have launched new body camera programs and policies. Our analysis is current as of the “last updated” date on each individual department scorecard. As we become aware of new deployments and policy changes, we will do our best to update our scorecard analysis. If you see anything that looks out of date, please let us know.

  Evaluation Criteria

 

We evaluated each department policy on eight criteria, derived from our Civil Rights Principles on Body Worn Cameras. We believe that these are among the most important factors in determining whether the proper policy safeguards are in place to protect the civil rights of recorded individuals.3

For each factor, we scored department policies on a three level scale. We awarded a policy a green check

 

 

only if it fully satisfies our criteria — these are the policies that other departments should consider emulating if they are looking to improve their own. A yellow circle 

 

 

 

means that a policy partially satisfies our criteria, and that the department has room for improvement. A red ex

 

 

 

 

 indicates that a policy either does not address the issue, or a policy runs directly against our principles. In cases where the department has not made its policy public, we use a question mark 

 

 

 

 

as a placeholder for future review.

 

Much, much more at:  Police Body Worn Cameras: A Policy Scorecard


"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in Washington DC, January 21, 2017.
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