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Treasured Social Butterfly
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Re: Period Poverty

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Message 41 of 48
I see sanitary products as a necessity for "good health" My, My, My, Cent. Most of us don't use them anymore. We are seniors you know.
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Treasured Social Butterfly
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Re: Period Poverty

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Message 42 of 48

@GailL1 wrote:

I know what my grandmother did and what my mother did also in the beginning before such products were readily available.

 

So what about our female college students?  They say they need free birth control - think they need this too?

 

What about others that are in the throws of poverty and are still menstruating?

 

NYT 08/29/2018 - Scotland to Provide Free Sanitary Products to Students

 

A parttime job on or off campus does help pay for incidentals.

Do we need a subsidy or a manufacturers program for low/no cost supplies for these female indigent?

 

A typical woman goes through more than 12,000 sanitary pads or tampons over the decades that she has her period.

 

But is long-term use of sanitary protection safe?

 

Members of Congress and women’s health advocacy groups have raised concerns about a lack of research into the safety of tampons, pads, and other feminine hygiene products such as douches.

 

“The reality is menstrual health has been considered a taboo subject for too long,” Rep. Carolyn Maloney, D-NY, says in an email. “It’s time that feminine hygiene products are thoroughly researched so that we can ensure that complete and accurate information is being collected and made readily accessible.”

 

U.S. sales of tampons and sanitary pads totaled $3 billion last year, according to a report by Euromonitor International.

 

“There is no research that unequivocally declares these feminine hygiene products are safe, and independent studies by women’s health organizations have found chemicals of concern like dioxin, carcinogens, and reproductive toxins in tampons and pads,” Maloney wrote in April in an op-ed piece in The Guardian, a British newspaper.

 

more at:  Are Feminine Hygiene Products Safe?

 

I see sanitary products as a necessity for "good health" and I find it odd some might  think otherwise, and suggest your grandmother used something else.  Our grandmothers had options to terminate a pregnancy as well, but that wasn't wise either.  Is this REALLY where conservatives want to draw the line?


"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in Washington DC, January 21, 2017.
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Valued Social Butterfly
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Re: Period Poverty

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Message 43 of 48

@GailL1 wrote:

@sp362 wrote:

Like all drugs, the price has increased far faster than the rate of inflation.  The cost of birth control pills now are roughly 6 times what they were in the mid-sixties in inflation adjusted dollars.


This article nor this thread is about birth control.


Then why are these lines in your first post:

 

"I know what my grandmother did and what my mother did also in the beginning before such products were readily available.

 

So what about our female college students?  They say they need free birth control - think they need this too?"

 

You need to explain to me how your comment is not "about birth control".

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Re: Period Poverty

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Message 44 of 48

@sp362 wrote:

Like all drugs, the price has increased far faster than the rate of inflation.  The cost of birth control pills now are roughly 6 times what they were in the mid-sixties in inflation adjusted dollars.


This article nor this thread is about birth control.

* * * * It's Always Something . . . Roseanne Roseannadanna
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Re: Period Poverty

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Message 45 of 48

@MIseker wrote:
At least covered by foodstamps, along with soap.
.

Soap or any paper products are NOT covered by SNAP -

What Can SNAP Buy?

Households CANNOT use SNAP benefits to buy:

  • Beer, wine, liquor, cigarettes or tobacco
  • Any nonfood items, such as:
  • pet foods  
  • soaps, paper products   
  • household supplies
  • Vitamins and medicines
  • Food that will be eaten in the store
  • Hot foods
* * * * It's Always Something . . . Roseanne Roseannadanna
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Re: Period Poverty

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Message 46 of 48

Like all drugs, the price has increased far faster than the rate of inflation.  The cost of birth control pills now are roughly 6 times what they were in the mid-sixties in inflation adjusted dollars.

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Re: Period Poverty

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Message 47 of 48
At least covered by foodstamps, along with soap.
So it begins.
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Period Poverty

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Message 48 of 48

I know what my grandmother did and what my mother did also in the beginning before such products were readily available.

 

So what about our female college students?  They say they need free birth control - think they need this too?

 

What about others that are in the throws of poverty and are still menstruating?

 

NYT 08/29/2018 - Scotland to Provide Free Sanitary Products to Students

 

A parttime job on or off campus does help pay for incidentals.

Do we need a subsidy or a manufacturers program for low/no cost supplies for these female indigent?

 

 

 

 

* * * * It's Always Something . . . Roseanne Roseannadanna
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