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Re: Our Caveman Politics

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Message 11 of 13
YES. whats going on is indicative of that..cavemanlike vs evolved toward civilization.

Back in my collegs days, 180 one professor offered proof among the students of our instinct. This was before the backpack days. Most men carried books under their arm, weapon like. Women carried theirs in one arm but perched on their stomach, like a baby. Wasnt a big deal..just something to think about. so what does it mean everyone uses a backpack now?


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Re: Our Caveman Politics

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Cavemen (our ancestors) perceived those in other groups different from them as threats to their food supply and other resources.

 

Maybe it is just genetics.

 

 

Life's a Journey, not a Destination" Aerosmith
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Our Caveman Politics

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Our caveman politics: Glenn Reynolds

Glenn Harlan ReynoldsPublished 9:21 a.m. ET Aug. 29, 2016
Economic policy based on 100,000-year-old emotions won't fix healthcare.

 

If you’re feeling bad about our politics today, blame your caveman ancestors. Or, more accurately, blame politicians who take advantage of traits evolved back during caveman days, even though they’re destructive now.

When human beings were hunter-gatherers living in isolated bands and tribes, which was the norm for hundreds of thousands of years (and longer if you count our proto-human ancestors) the supply of goods available at any given moment was largely fixed. Some years there was more game, or more berries to be harvested, and some years there was less, but in neither case did it have much to do with human actions. Hunters or gatherers could range a bit farther, or work a bit longer, but they couldn’t increase the supply of antelopes or fruit. What the tribe had was all there was, so if one person was eating more than his share, it meant less for everyone else.

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And, of course, fear of others — xenophobia — was a major feature of caveman life, and with good reason. For cavemen, the others (which might just mean the tribe over the next hill) really were a threat, and constant vigilance was always necessary. Modern nations aren’t without enemies, of course, but politicians tend to play on xenophobic instincts not in terms of actual enemies abroad, but in the context of (largely manufactured) enmity at home, as they set different groups of citizens against one another in order to secure power.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/2016/08/29/cavemen-politics-healthcare-evolution-instinct-mam...

Life's a Journey, not a Destination" Aerosmith
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