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Re: Our Caveman Politics

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Message 1 of 13

@nyadrn wrote:

Cavemen (our ancestors) perceived those in other groups different from them as threats to their food supply and other resources.

 

Maybe it is just genetics.

 

 


According to The National Academy of Sciences....................

 

Community differentiation is a fundamental topic of the social sciences, and its prehistoric origins in Europe are typically assumed to lie among the complex, densely populated societies that developed millennia after their Neolithic predecessors.

 

Here we present the earliest, statistically significant evidence for such differentiation among the first farmers of Neolithic Europe.

 

By using strontium isotopic data from more than 300 early Neolithic human skeletons, we find significantly less variance in geographic signatures among males than we find among females, and less variance among burials with ground stone adzes than burials without such adzes.

 

From this, in context with other available evidence, we infer differential land use in early Neolithic central Europe within a patrilocal kinship system.

 

Source - http://www.pnas.org/content/109/24/9326.abstract

 

I Interpret this to mean - even Caveman played - Follow the Neanderthal Leader........................just like many contemporary Republicans do today......................................

 

 

( " China if You're Listening - Get Trumps Tax Returns " )

" )
" - Anonymous

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Re: Our Caveman Politics

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@gruffstuff wrote:

 

Personally I think the best solution to the problem of to many people and not enough resources is to make less people, we have the means to do that, and in my opinion it is the better alternative to conflict over resources and killing the planet for all other living things with human overpopulation.

 

 

 

 


The first atlatl may have started technology....it increased the strength in that cave-man's arm by adding to the length of the lever arm propelling that projectile. Things changed again very quickly with the coming of the bow and then the wheel and domesticated animals like the dog and horse without which we would NOT be who, what and where we are.. 

 

Agriculture is actually technology of another sort, don't you agree?  You're right, of course.  However, 'the beast' has a genetic make-up AND cultural norms and mores that simply do not change rapidly enough to keep pace with technology. That  has consequences.

 

Consequences like the ability to effect damage on other  humans....and to our entire earth.  Stuff like that based on technology increases arithmetically, then geometrically and now.....wow!  'The beast', though, can now kill 'everybody' with the push of a button and doesn't seem to have changed much otherwise.

 

Oh....and the mythology once put forward to 'explain' the 'unexplainable' somehow became doctrine. Less people are the solution you say....I agree wholeheartedly. But...man himself put those words in Genesis I:28.  Man spoke for a supernatural being he created when he wrote "Be fruitful and multiply" and all the rest that goes with it.  Beliefs.

 

Overpopulation, depleted resources, 'lebensraum' etc. etc. Before you can do anything about those, you have to do something about THAT.  Good Luck to you....good luck to us all.  We sure need it.

 

Man can do so much..........and 'the beast' can not cope.

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Re: Our Caveman Politics

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Message 3 of 13

@GailL1 wrote:

@MaVolta wrote:

@nyadrn - Interesting article, thanks for sharing.

 

It is a human instinct to protect what is "ours" such as family, friends, co-workers, but also our country, our property, our rights or civil liberties, etc. We back the home team. I do believe that is inherent to our nature. It stands to reason that it would bleed over into politics. If there is a way for politicians to take advantage of it, then I'm sure they will, and do. 

 


Wonder if this instinct is where racism, bigotry and xenophobia originated?

 

Can politicians change instinct?


I have always wondered if this is at the root of fear and distrust of people different from ourselves.  Anger is one expression of fear and I find it easier to understand than just learned behavior.   And yes I definitely think anyone can change... or at least mostly anyone.

 

 

Life's a Journey, not a Destination" Aerosmith
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Re: Our Caveman Politics

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Message 4 of 13

@gruffstuff wrote:

 

 

Personally I think the best solution to the problem of to many people and not enough resources is to make less people, we have the means to do that, and in my opinion it is the better alternative to conflict over resources and killing the planet for all other living things with human overpopulation.

 

It looks like Trump may have heard your plea and whith his new immigration policy in which he plans to curtain lagal immgration. you may find that perhaps  people will have more resources instead of less.Will  that solve the issue?  I don't know.
 

 

 


 

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Re: Our Caveman Politics

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Message 5 of 13

Our Caveman Politics

 

While I agree with the sentiment,  I don't agree with the analogy.

 

Hunter gathers did live in small isolated groups, but their greatest obstacle to survival was the nature of being a hunter gather more then anything else. These people had to carry everything they had from place to place, including children, and they were constantly on the move. Populations were low, one estimate put the human population of the British Isles at five thousand people. I really doubt people ran into each other all that much.

 

The concept of ownership, of things and land, came later after people discovered they could harvest wild grains in the fertile crescent and stay attached to the land, build permanent dwellings, have free time for art, science, math, writing,  and more complex tools. 

 

With cultivation came the first civilizations, with kings and clerics, war and conquest, the haves and the have nots. That is when kings and clerics set people against each other for political reasons and people went along with that to keep their stuff.

 

Politics is more about farmers then is is about cavemen. 

 

People recognized this problem and dealt with is with the concept of the commons and common land, as the population of the world grows it becomes less practical to share lands, seas, grasslands, and farmlands, it's now more practical to just share the resources those thing produce.

 

Personally I think the best solution to the problem of to many people and not enough resources is to make less people, we have the means to do that, and in my opinion it is the better alternative to conflict over resources and killing the planet for all other living things with human overpopulation.

 

 

 

 

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Re: Our Caveman Politics

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Message 6 of 13

@MaVolta wrote:

@nyadrn - Interesting article, thanks for sharing.

 

It is a human instinct to protect what is "ours" such as family, friends, co-workers, but also our country, our property, our rights or civil liberties, etc. We back the home team. I do believe that is inherent to our nature. It stands to reason that it would bleed over into politics. If there is a way for politicians to take advantage of it, then I'm sure they will, and do. 

 

 

 

 


Wonder if this instinct is where racism, bigotry and xenophobia originated?

 

Can politicians change instinct?

* * * * It's Always Something . . . Roseanne Roseannadanna
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Re: Our Caveman Politics

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Message 7 of 13

@MaVolta wrote:

@MIseker wrote:
YES. whats going on is indicative of that..cavemanlike vs evolved toward civilization.

Back in my collegs days, 180 one professor offered proof among the students of our instinct. This was before the backpack days. Most men carried books under their arm, weapon like. Women carried theirs in one arm but perched on their stomach, like a baby. Wasnt a big deal..just something to think about. so what does it mean everyone uses a backpack now?

We have regressed into beasts of burden? Cat Wink


Ha !  no wonder I am so tired.

 

 

 

 

Life's a Journey, not a Destination" Aerosmith
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Message 8 of 13

@MIseker wrote:
YES. whats going on is indicative of that..cavemanlike vs evolved toward civilization.

Back in my collegs days, 180 one professor offered proof among the students of our instinct. This was before the backpack days. Most men carried books under their arm, weapon like. Women carried theirs in one arm but perched on their stomach, like a baby. Wasnt a big deal..just something to think about. so what does it mean everyone uses a backpack now?


Hmmm  I don't know   That's where dad always carried us (on his back) when we were toddlers?

 

 

Life's a Journey, not a Destination" Aerosmith
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Re: Our Caveman Politics

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Message 9 of 13

@MIseker wrote:
YES. whats going on is indicative of that..cavemanlike vs evolved toward civilization.

Back in my collegs days, 180 one professor offered proof among the students of our instinct. This was before the backpack days. Most men carried books under their arm, weapon like. Women carried theirs in one arm but perched on their stomach, like a baby. Wasnt a big deal..just something to think about. so what does it mean everyone uses a backpack now?



We have regressed into beasts of burden? Cat Wink

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Re: Our Caveman Politics

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Message 10 of 13

@nyadrn - Interesting article, thanks for sharing.

 

It is a human instinct to protect what is "ours" such as family, friends, co-workers, but also our country, our property, our rights or civil liberties, etc. We back the home team. I do believe that is inherent to our nature. It stands to reason that it would bleed over into politics. If there is a way for politicians to take advantage of it, then I'm sure they will, and do. 

 

 

 

 

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