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Re: LET'S TALK CLIMATE

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Message 31 of 70
don't know but we need to start acting sooner as opposed to later. The greenhouse gases at these way above normal levels stay in the atmosphere for a very long time, so even if we went to zero emissions, gonna have some time to go with climate disasters before things get anywhere near back to normal. WE need to act sooner as opposed to later.
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Re: LET'S TALK CLIMATE

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Message 32 of 70

@Olderscout66 wrote:

@jimc91 wrote:

@Tom5678 wrote:

Gulf Coast to get up to 20 inches of rain!!!

 

we had better get used to stuff like this.


It's hurricane season...  We have it every year and we often have hurricanes and tropical storms that have a lot of rain in them.

 

In 1998 when I lived in south Florida a tropical storm dumped 26 inches of rain in 24 hours.  The next day during low tide everything east of US-1 was completely drained.  Everything west of US-1 stayed wet for 2 weeks.

 

It's a weather event, not to be confused with the "Climate".

 

 

 

 


It's "weather" when you cite a single event like you just did.

It's "climate change" when you examine long-term increases in the number and severity of storms. By the way, Miami is east of Highway 1, and it doesn't "drain" worth beans any more because of the rise in sealevel - you know, that thing you and yours were claiming a year ago would never happen?


Will an outrageously high carbon tax make the water drain quicker?  We need proof that high carbon taxes will mitigate the climate not just liberal talking points.  How long will it take for the new high taxes to fix the climate?

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Re: LET'S TALK CLIMATE

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Message 33 of 70

NO EXPERIMENTAL EVIDENCE FOR THE SIGNIFICANT ANTHROPOGENIC CLIMATE CHANGE

 

J. KAUPPINEN AND P. MALMI

 

Abstract.

 

In this paper we will prove that GCM-models used in IPCC report AR5 fail to calculate the influences of the low cloud cover changes on the global temperature. That is why those models give a very small natural temperature change leaving a very large change for the contribution of the green house gases in the observed temperature.

 

This is the reason why IPCC has to use a very large sensitivity to compensate a too small natural component. Further they have to leave out the strong negative feedback due to the clouds in order to magnify the sensitivity. In addition, this paper proves that the changes in the low cloud cover fraction practically control the global temperature.

 

1. Introduction

 

The climate sensitivity has an extremely large uncertainty in the scientific lit- erature. The smallest values estimated are very close to zero while the highest ones are even 9 degrees Celsius for a doubling of CO2. The majority of the papers are using theoretical general circulation models (GCM) for the estimation. These models give very big sensitivities with a very large uncertainty range. Typically sensitivity values are between 2–5 degrees. IPCC uses these papers to estimate the global temperature anomalies and the climate sensitivity. However, there are a lot of papers, where sensitivities lower than one degree are estimated without using GCM. The basic problem is still a missing experimental evidence of the cli- mate sensitivity. One of the authors (JK) worked as an expert reviewer of IPCC AR5 report. One of his comments concerned the missing experimental evidence for the very large sensitivity presented in the report [1]. As a response to the com- ment IPCC claims that an observational evidence exists for example in Technical Summary of the report. In this paper we will study the case carefully.

 

2. Low cloud cover controls practically the global temperature

 

The basic task is to divide the observed global temperature anomaly into two parts: the natural component and the part due to the green house gases. In order to study the response we have to re-present Figure TS.12 from Technical Summary of IPCC AR5 report (1). This figure is Figure 1. Here we highlight the subfigure “Land and ocean surface” in Figure 1. Only the black curve is an observed tem- perature anomaly in that figure. The red and blue envelopes are computed using climate models. We do not consider computational results as experimental evi- dence. Especially the results obtained by climate models are questionable because the results are conflicting with each other.

 

READ THE REPORT HERE:

 

6 J. KAUPPINEN AND P. MALMI

 

IPCC represents the climate sensitivity more than one order of magnitude larger than our sensitivity 0.24àC. Because the anthropogenic portion in the increased CO2 is less than 10 %, we have practically no anthropogenic climate change. The low clouds control mainly the global temperature.

 

References

 

  1. [1]  T.F. Stocker, D. Qin, G.-K. Plattner, L.V. Alexander, S.K. Allen, N.L. Bindoff, F.-M. Breon, J.A. Church, U. Cubasch, S. Emori, P. Forster, P. Friedlingstein, N. Gillett, J.M. Gregory, D.L. Hartmann, E. Jansen, B. Kirtman, R. Knutti, K. Krishna Kumar, P. Lemke, J. Marotzke, V. Masson-Delmotte, G.A. Meehl, I.I. Mokhov, S. Piao, V. Ramaswamy, D. Randall, M. Rhein, M. Rojas, C. Sabine, D. Shindell, L.D. Talley, D.G. Vaughan, and S.-P. Xie. Technical Sum- mary, book section TS, page 33115. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom and New York, NY, USA, 2013.

  2. [2]  J. Kauppinen, J. Heinonen, and P. Malmi. Influence of relative humidity and clouds on the global mean surface temperature. Energy & Environment, 25(2):389–399, 2014.

  3. [3]  J. Kauppinen, J. Heinonen, and P. Malmi. Major portions in climate change; physical ap- proach. International Review of Physics, 5(5):260–270, 2011.

  4. [4]  J. Kauppinen and P. Malmi. Major feedback factors and effects of the cloud cover and the relative humidity on the climate. arXiv e-prints, page arXiv:1812.11547, Dec 2018.

  5. [5]  G. Myhre, E. J. Highwood, K. P. Shine, and F. Stordal. New estimates of radiative forcing due to well mixed greenhouse gases. Geophysical Research Letters, 25(14):2715–2718, 1998.

  6. [6]  J. Kauppinen and P. Malmi. To be published.

    Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku

    E-mail address: jyrkau@utu.fi

 

 +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

And so ClimateGate continues.  No, there is not a "Consensus of settled science..."

 

 

 

 

 

VIMTSTL
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Re: LET'S TALK CLIMATE

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Message 34 of 70

@jimc91 wrote:

@Tom5678 wrote:

Gulf Coast to get up to 20 inches of rain!!!

 

we had better get used to stuff like this.


It's hurricane season...  We have it every year and we often have hurricanes and tropical storms that have a lot of rain in them.

 

In 1998 when I lived in south Florida a tropical storm dumped 26 inches of rain in 24 hours.  The next day during low tide everything east of US-1 was completely drained.  Everything west of US-1 stayed wet for 2 weeks.

 

It's a weather event, not to be confused with the "Climate".

 

 

 

 


It's "weather" when you cite a single event like you just did.

It's "climate change" when you examine long-term increases in the number and severity of storms. By the way, Miami is east of Highway 1, and it doesn't "drain" worth beans any more because of the rise in sealevel - you know, that thing you and yours were claiming a year ago would never happen?

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Re: LET'S TALK CLIMATE

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Message 35 of 70

@Tom5678 wrote:

Gulf Coast to get up to 20 inches of rain!!!

 

we had better get used to stuff like this.


It's hurricane season...  We have it every year and we often have hurricanes and tropical storms that have a lot of rain in them.

 

In 1998 when I lived in south Florida a tropical storm dumped 26 inches of rain in 24 hours.  The next day during low tide everything east of US-1 was completely drained.  Everything west of US-1 stayed wet for 2 weeks.

 

It's a weather event, not to be confused with the "Climate".

 

 

 

 

VIMTSTL
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Re: LET'S TALK CLIMATE

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Message 36 of 70

Gulf Coast to get up to 20 inches of rain!!!

 

we had better get used to stuff like this.

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Re: LET'S TALK CLIMATE

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Message 37 of 70

@Tom5678 wrote:

Heat records in Alaska are shattered. Not good. Been heat waves all over the place this early summer.

 

Baked Alaska.


Yet the deniers still deny.


Democrats in 2020
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Re: LET'S TALK CLIMATE

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Message 38 of 70

Heat records in Alaska are shattered. Not good. Been heat waves all over the place this early summer.

 

Baked Alaska.

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Re: LET'S TALK CLIMATE

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Message 39 of 70

LET'S TALK CLIMATE

 

This is decade zero, the time for talking about climate change is over.

 

https://www.un.org/en/climatechange/un-climate-summit-2019.shtml

 

UN Climate Action Summit 2019

 

Global emissions are reaching record levels and show no sign of peaking. The last four years were the four hottest on record, and winter temperatures in the Arctic have risen by 3°C since 1990. Sea levels are rising, coral reefs are dying, and we are starting to see the life-threatening impact of climate change on health, through air pollution, heatwaves and risks to food security.

 

 

The impacts of climate change are being felt everywhere and are having very real consequences on people’s lives. Climate change is disrupting national economies, costing us dearly today and even more tomorrow. But there is a growing recognition that affordable, scalable solutions are available now that will enable us all to leapfrog to cleaner, more resilient economies.

 

 

The latest analysis shows that if we act now, we can reduce carbon emissions within 12 years and hold the increase in the global average temperature to well below 2°C and even, as asked by the latest science, to 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels.

 

 

Thankfully, we have the Paris Agreement – a visionary, viable, forward-looking policy framework that sets out exactly what needs to be done to stop climate disruption and reverse its impact. But the agreement itself is meaningless without ambitious action.

 

 

UN Secretary-General António Guterres is calling on all leaders to come to New York on 23 September with concrete, realistic plans to enhance their nationally determined contributions by 2020, in line with reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 45 per cent over the next decade, and to net zero emissions by 2050.

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LET'S TALK CLIMATE

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Message 40 of 70

This March, global levels of CO2 passed 400 parts per million. Although short-term local measurements of 400 ppm have been recorded previously, this marks the first time since record keeping began that CO2 levels were above 400 ppm globally for a month

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