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Re: JUDGE FORMALLY REPRIMANDED

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Message 11 of 30

@alferdpacker wrote:

 


@TxGrandpa2 wrote:

I probably would find the set-up in other states as strange..


True...

When one has become acclimated to a


--

I understand that in Colorado the counties are considered to be a subdivision of state government existing to administer state programs at a local level.  As a subdivison of the state government, they have no court system of their own.  How quaint!!!

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Re: JUDGE FORMALLY REPRIMANDED

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Message 12 of 30

Nerdymom and AP-- yup, our little town judges are elected and they do not have to have any type of legal degree or training. They just have to learn the laws. I worked for two years with a town judge. and I asked him how he went about  becoming a judge after I found out he had never been to law school  He ran, was elected, studied from whatever was given to him,  Been on the town court bench for years--usually traffic, DUI, public lewdness, etc.

 Hey, welcome to my world!!

Gee, I miss having a real President!!
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Re: JUDGE FORMALLY REPRIMANDED

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Message 13 of 30

 


@TxGrandpa2 wrote:

I probably would find the set-up in other states as strange..


True...

When one has become acclimated to a

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Re: JUDGE FORMALLY REPRIMANDED

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Message 14 of 30

@NerdyMom wrote:

OK.  I'm stunned.   There are places where people can be JUDGES and not be lawyers first?  

 

 


--

Perhaps an understanding of what the County Judge is in Texas....

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Government_of_Texas#County

 

Each county is run by a five-member Commissioners' Court consisting of four commissioners elected from single-member districts (called commissioner precincts) and a county judge elected at-large. The county judge does not have authority to veto a decision of the commissioners court; the judge votes along with the commissioners (being the tie-breaker in close calls). In smaller counties, the county judge actually does perform judicial duties, but in larger counties the judge's role is limited to serving on the commissioners court and certifying elections.

 

Looking at Burnet County's population, there is no way to determine whether the County Judge has judicial responsibilities also.  In our county, like most in Texas, his duties is completely administrative. 

 

And different states have different governmental organization...I probably would find the set-up in Colorado, or other states as strange..

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Re: JUDGE FORMALLY REPRIMANDED

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Message 15 of 30

 


@NerdyMom wrote:

@pc6063 wrote:

AP- in my county town justices are elected. They do not have to have any formal legal education. I see this is a county judge, but there is no indication as to whether Texas demands any sort of political  justice education with regards to this position.

 

Having said that, this is an atrocity, and I feel that Texas has taken the appropriate measures  to correct the situation. However, let's hope they do a thorough review of all those justices who do not have proper education with regard to the law. 


OK.  I'm stunned.   There are places where people can be JUDGES and not be lawyers first?  

 

 


Apparently that's the case.

 

Not requiring a judge to be a lawyer first...

 

A "judge" completely devoid of formal education in the law...

 

How quaint - a fatuous and dishonest exaggeration...

 

Even the Gilbert and Sullivan judge was more qualified...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7FiOmiiX48I

 

In 24 states in the nation - a "judge" isn't necessarily required to be sufficiently trained in the law to be qualified to hear and decide a parking ticket dispute should that decision be appealed...

 

Glad I live in a state where even a city or county judge is actually a trained lawyer who has passed the bar exam and is capable of being a functional judge in a court of law - and not a pretentious holder of a fatuously exaggerated and unrealistic title.

 

It's instructive to learn of those quaint and fanciful folkways that illustrate much of the reason Putin's boi trump was elected...

 

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Re: JUDGE FORMALLY REPRIMANDED

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Message 16 of 30

@umbarch64 wrote:


 

I think that might be more 'standard' in 'any' state than what you said.  Don't mean to say it isn't the way it's done in Texas.  For example, I don't know of any State where what you term a CAO with the duties you say he has is termed a 'judge'.  A 'judge' is otherwise defined. But it is Texas under discussion, after all.

 


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As I have posted, the internet is full of information, and when I'm not aware of something, I've learned how to use it for research.  But now you know that the County Judge is it's Chief Administrator Officer, with a staff of Commissioners heading up precincts; and their main job is to mostly oversee road and other projects within their jurisdiction.

 

Even in some eastern states the head of commissioners court is called a judge.

 

Regarding the purpose of this topic, I'm sure that the original poster, not being familiar with Texas government saw the charge against the Judge and immediatly decide to join in throwing barbs. 

 

Suggest you google 'county government in Texas'.  I note one could do so for other states.

 

And contrary to what some here are trying to say, we are civilized here in Texas; enjoys for the most part good racial relations and that is basically why we chose to take my retirement here.  I found that my wife and I, and our family could live here without the bias and prejudice we've met in other areas of the country. 

 

This is by no means either a small or poor county, but good sized with a varied, diverse population and a heavy economic base.

 

 

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Re: JUDGE FORMALLY REPRIMANDED

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Message 17 of 30

@pc6063 wrote:

AP- in my county town justices are elected. They do not have to have any formal legal education. I see this is a county judge, but there is no indication as to whether Texas demands any sort of political  justice education with regards to this position.

 

Having said that, this is an atrocity, and I feel that Texas has taken the appropriate measures  to correct the situation. However, let's hope they do a thorough review of all those justices who do not have proper education with regard to the law. 


OK.  I'm stunned.   There are places where people can be JUDGES and not be lawyers first?  

 

 

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Re: JUDGE FORMALLY REPRIMANDED

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Message 18 of 30

@TxGrandpa2 wrote:

@umbarch64 wrote:


OK...got that.  'Jurisdiction' appears to be the wrong word to use. 

Do ANY of the decisions rendered by the County Judge having consensus from the County Commisioners affect people residing in OR coming into their 'purview'?  

Do the actions of the 'assembly' have the force of law...i.e...do they make laws? 

IF so, are law enforcement officials required to enforce those laws?

Are the County Judge, District Commisioners as well as the law enforcement officials elected offices or appointed ones? 

Are appointments made by an elected official OR officials?   



 


Exactly as I posted, he is the Chief Administrative Officer of the county.  He and the members of the 'Commissioners Court' mainly decide budgets, oversee maintenance of county roads, buildings, etc.  They do not make criminal law, except far as speed limits on county roads.  And of course county officials are elected much as city officials.  I would think that would be standard in any state. 

 

OK...IF what you say is accurate, the States with which I am familiar don't do it 'quite' the way you describe.  County Councils, County Commisions, Town Councils, City Councils, Town Boards etc. can and do pass ordinances which are law.  When codified they become 'the' County Code, Town Code, City Code, etc., which are ordinances[laws] organized into a more easily administered comprehensive whole.  More efficient that way, donchsee? 

 

Easier for 'common' folks to know what it is they should do...more importantly what it is that will get them tossed into the 'slammer' or cost them 'big bucks'.  User friendly, so to speak.  The State Constitution, if there is one, usually delegates authority and allows lesser jurisdictions to pass laws in accordance with Constitutional requirement....which, by the way, must be consistent with the US Constitiuton. 

 

Laws require enforcement. That takes cops and judges and lawyers etc.  Small jurisdictions without the wherewithall often contract with larger jurisdictions better able to afford to pay competent enforcement officers to enforce the laws of their jurisdiction.  

 

I think that might be more 'standard' in 'any' state than what you said.  Don't mean to say it isn't the way it's done in Texas.  For example, I don't know of any State where what you term a CAO with the duties you say he has is termed a 'judge'.  A 'judge' is otherwise defined. But it is Texas under discussion, after all.

 

I would say that county administration in Texas is much the same as any other state. 

 

See above.

 

And I would believe that your interrogations come across as some executive drilling an employee for information.  Of course there is the internet where you could find this information. 

 

Hey...correct me if I'm wrong about this, but you are the one living in Texas.  You claim it is  'outsiders...troublemakers' interfering in 'local affairs' makin' a big 'stink' over 'nothin what's wrong'. That right?  I was just looking for you to let me in on the inside dope...stuff I thought I needed to know 'cause you said I needed to .  I thought the questions were good ones...internet information is not reliable...I 'know' your's is.  It is, isn't it?

 

But your questioning does point out what I have said about posters from other states making posts about the state that they actually have no idea about. 

 

Nahhh.  I wanted to find out IF you actually knew where Texas fit into the scheme of things here and now in the 21st Century.  US citizen to US citizen...Veteran to Veteran.  Nothing but the facts...nothing more, nothing less.

 

Even the subject title assumes that the judge that was reprimanded is a criminal judge.  Points out the that the majority of these type posts are made without first researching.... just pickup on a few sentences and fire off posts without knowing background.  Many assumptions. 

 

I agree....it does seem to be that way....'tis true, 'tis pity...and pity 'tis 'tis true.  Well....now at least now some know better after what's been said.  That's progress.   


 

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Re: JUDGE FORMALLY REPRIMANDED

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Message 19 of 30

@umbarch64 wrote:


OK...got that.  'Jurisdiction' appears to be the wrong word to use. 

Do ANY of the decisions rendered by the County Judge having consensus from the County Commisioners affect people residing in OR coming into their 'purview'?  

Do the actions of the 'assembly' have the force of law...i.e...do they make laws? 

IF so, are law enforcement officials required to enforce those laws?

Are the County Judge, District Commisioners as well as the law enforcement officials elected offices or appointed ones? 

Are appointments made by an elected official OR officials?   



 


Exactly as I posted, he is the Chief Administrative Officer of the county.  He and the members of the 'Commissioners Court' mainly decide budgets, oversee maintenance of county roads, buildings, etc.  They do not make criminal law, except far as speed limits on county roads.  And of course county officials are elected much as city officials.  I would think that would be standard in any state. 

 

I would say that county administration in Texas is much the same as any other state. 

 

And I would believe that your interrogations come across as some executive drilling an employee for information.  Of course there is the internet where you could find this information. 

 

But your questioning does point out what I have said about posters from other states making posts about the state that they actually have no idea about. 

 

Even the subject title assumes that the judge that was reprimanded is a criminal judge.  Points out the that the majority of these type posts are made without first researching.... just pickup on a few sentences and fire off posts without knowing background.  Many assumptions. 

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Re: JUDGE FORMALLY REPRIMANDED

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Message 20 of 30

@TxGrandpa2 wrote:

The County Judge in Texas is the Chief Executive of the county, more ot the Chief Administrator of the county.  The position is not what one would think would preside over either criminal or civil trials, in fact doesn't even preside in any courtroom. 

 

Why then is he called a judge?  I'm not being contentious, just curious.  IF that County Judge does not preside over either criminal or civil trials, who does?  IF some other official does that, what is that official called?  Is that position an elected or apointed position? 

 

More like a Mayor in a city since he has to reach a consensus with County Commissioners representing the various precincts of the country.  I would suggest that his comments therefore has nothing to do with any judicial process, or even affect such processes.

 

OK...got that.  'Jurisdiction' appears to be the wrong word to use. 

Do ANY of the decisions rendered by the County Judge having consensus from the County Commisioners affect people residing in OR coming into their 'purview'?  

Do the actions of the 'assembly' have the force of law...i.e...do they make laws? 

IF so, are law enforcement officials required to enforce those laws?

Are the County Judge, District Commisioners as well as the law enforcement officials elected offices or appointed ones? 

Are appointments made by an elected official OR officials?   

 

 Of course one needs to realize that posters are from out of state and only thing they know about the state is from the media and like the Will Rogers quote that is the reason for their ignorance.

 

OK...got that.  Guess you and are are serving a worthwhile purpose.  We seem to have become "educators'.  So now let's see if what we are teaching is the reality of what is. 

Does the voter determine who is elected to office?

Does the elected official appoint the appointed official?

Does both elected and appointed offices therefor reflect the will of the voter?

Does the will of the voter reflect the attitudes and convictions of the Community of voters? 

Given that...are laws and the enforcement of laws consistently the same throughout Texas?

Is  all of that consistent with Texas' status as a State subject to compliance with the Republic of the United States Constitution?

 

These attempts is somewhat like a lynching on the part of those posting such and those participating are similar to scavengers jumping on juicy gossip, all the while using innuendo. 

 

Yeah....well....I really, really dislike the practice of saying, "He does it toooooooo!"  But you already know that, so I guess there is not need for me to do what I don't like to do.  I thank you for that.

 

But of course anyone on these forums is free to make themselves look foolish.

 

Ok...got that too and I completely agree.


 

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