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Valued Social Butterfly
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Re: It's not normal

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People have warned since the beginning of this charade that we are in danger not only from the abominable behavior[s] and lies, but from the numbness that comes from pervasive repetition.  That numbness results in the idea that this really is now 'normal'.  The 'new normal'.  

 

The report lays it out.  I have to point out that this is not new. In and around the Korean 'police action', the term 'brain washing' came into use.  It was a psychological process then employed primarily on individuals not able to get away from it.  Prisoners.  "Brain-washing" was one premise behind a movie called "The Manchurian Candidate".  The term isn't used much anymore.  Perhaps it should be.

 

Numerous books came out back then using 'brain-washing' as a basis for their plot. Numerous books have come out now that bear remarkable similarity to what happened before.  Just updated for current consumption.

 

See.....it really can happen here.  Seems to me it has.

 

 

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Valued Social Butterfly
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It's not normal

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https://www.cnn.com/2018/08/01/opinions/what-trump-is-doing-to-america-is-not-normal-opinion-dantoni...

 

What Trump is doing to America is not normal

 

 

(CNN)You cannot go wrong by expecting the worst from Donald Trump.

 

Within 24 hours, he called on the attorney general to halt the investigation into his campaign's links to Russia, slammed the criminal prosecution of his former campaign manager Paul Manafort as a "hoax," and lied with great confidence at his Florida rally about his own popularity.Add his wacky claim that people need to present identification to buy groceries, and you get Trump at his worst.
 
Coming from any other President, Trump's brand of crazy talk -- much of it personal, ugly, and deranged -- would be enough to prompt calls for the White House doctor, who would, at the very least, prescribe some rest. But with Trump, statements that sound like he's trying to obstruct justice and distort reality no longer stir widespread outrage because he has taught the world to stop trying to make sense of what he says.
 
Eighteen months into his administration, Trump has bombarded us with so much awful noise that our minds have been trained to disregard much of it.
 
A good analogy from biology is what happens to people who work in foul environments and become desensitized to the odors. They just don't notice the stench anymore. In psychology, this process has been observed when it comes to violence. Repeated exposures inure people to the suffering.
 
With Trump, it seems like the natural inclination for those who don't agree with him is to defend themselves from the onslaught by abandoning the idea that the public will get anything approaching truth, dignity, and decency from our President.
 
We also try to tamp down the sense of fear we experience because our minds cannot handle the hits of adrenaline that come when Trump's awful words and the mob-like reactions from his followers trigger our fight-or-flight response.
 
Many people can recognize the signs of danger in words or the shifting mood of a crowd. When CNN's Jim Acosta recently warned of the potential for violence inspired by Trump's rageful comments about journalists, he demonstrated a higher-order version of this instinct. Acosta tweeted a video of his encounter with Trump supporters at the President's rally in Tampa, Florida and wrote, "We should not treat our fellow Americans this way. The press is not the enemy."
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