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Iowa Caucus

With 62% of the vote in, Pete Buttigieg is the big winner so far, while Biden is the big loser.

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Bernie loses another coin toss. 

 

An unusual coin toss...

 

 

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@CriticalThinking wrote:

With 62% of the vote in, Pete Buttigieg is the big winner so far, while Biden is the big loser.


After seeing the disaster of Iowa, hoping that the rest of the country doesn't count the votes like in Iowa.
We need uncomplicated number of votes. in our elections and not the mishmash of what  has happened here.|

Gee I hate to be right on this, but did the democrats have managed to loose the elections?  is this what we  are suppose to see overall?

 

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@Roxanna35 wrote:

@CriticalThinking wrote:

With 62% of the vote in, Pete Buttigieg is the big winner so far, while Biden is the big loser.


After seeing the disaster of Iowa, hoping that the rest of the country doesn't count the votes like in Iowa.
We need uncomplicated number of votes. in our elections and not the mishmash of what  has happened here.|

 

 


So, you don't think that "Caucuses" are closer to "the people"?  Iowa has been doing it this way for a very long time.  They are also 1st in the line of primaries.  Do you think they should be 1st in this line?  I mean they really aren't a mirror of the rest of the country - Some think that a state like Florida, with a diverse population in lots of different areas, should be 1st in line.  Think that would give a better measure of who likes who in the initial primary.  New Hampshire isn't much different as far as mirroring the country.

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@GailL1 wrote:

@Roxanna35 wrote:

@CriticalThinking wrote:

With 62% of the vote in, Pete Buttigieg is the big winner so far, while Biden is the big loser.


After seeing the disaster of Iowa, hoping that the rest of the country doesn't count the votes like in Iowa.
We need uncomplicated number of votes. in our elections and not the mishmash of what  has happened here.|

 

 


So, you don't think that "Caucuses" are closer to "the people"?  Iowa has been doing it this way for a very long time.  They are also 1st in the line of primaries.  Do you think they should be 1st in this line?  I mean they really aren't a mirror of the rest of the country - Some think that a state like Florida, with a diverse population in lots of different areas, should be 1st in line.  Think that would give a better measure of who likes who in the initial primary.  New Hampshire isn't much different as far as mirroring the country.


Closer to the people? You must mean closer to the people at Harvard and NASA because I've been reading the Wiki page on the Iowa Caucuses for half-an-hour and have no idea what they're talking about.

 

New Hampshire doesn't mirror the country either, but at least it's one citizen one vote.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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@LouLit01 wrote:

@GailL1 wrote:


So, you don't think that "Caucuses" are closer to "the people"?  Iowa has been doing it this way for a very long time.  They are also 1st in the line of primaries.  Do you think they should be 1st in this line?  I mean they really aren't a mirror of the rest of the country - Some think that a state like Florida, with a diverse population in lots of different areas, should be 1st in line.  Think that would give a better measure of who likes who in the initial primary.  New Hampshire isn't much different as far as mirroring the country.


Closer to the people? You must mean closer to the people at Harvard and NASA because I've been reading the Wiki page on the Iowa Caucuses for half-an-hour and have no idea what they're talking about.

 

New Hampshire doesn't mirror the country either, but at least it's one citizen one vote.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


It is one citizen (registered voter) - one vote in the Iowa Caucuses too.  It is just a more hands own community event than going into a voting booth all by your lonesome.  It is done in rounds right there in the individual pricincts - think there were about 1700 of them in bars(no drinks served), local restaurants, municipal buildings, homes, churches, schools - different sizes based on the population of the area.

 

Rules are set by the Party and the rules are gone over after everybody has arrived by a specific time.

  • They arrive and register or are checked off if previously registered
  • They fill out a piece of paper indicating their candidate choice or undecided
  • They divide up the room for each of the candidates - you go over to where your choice is set up
  • Depending upon the total registered # in the entire room, a 15% margin is set (that's the % used for this caucus).  If the candidate's crowd does not meet the 15% viable margin, that candidate is out and their crowd is woo'd by those candidates that have met the margin.
  • Lots of discussion, selling of the candidates on issues and other qualification to get your neighbor to come on over to your viable candidate.  Yes, you can also convince others or they can convince you.
  • Then there is another vote - another count of how many are standing with a particular candidate's group - yes, some people leave before this count - they may not want to pick another candidate
  • The final number by candidate is recorded by the official and reported - think they report by county and the county is suppose to report to the state.

It is loud, the media loves it because they can get all their demographics of the crowd before the end result is known.  There was a great turn out this year - weather was great and people were pumped for their candidate, if they had decided at that point.

 

What better way than neighbor talking to neighbor about their preference.

Would it work everywhere - I doubt that, but in contrast to the normal way, it shows lots more dedication to me. 

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@GailL1 wrote:

@LouLit01 wrote:

@GailL1 wrote:


So, you don't think that "Caucuses" are closer to "the people"?  Iowa has been doing it this way for a very long time.  They are also 1st in the line of primaries.  Do you think they should be 1st in this line?  I mean they really aren't a mirror of the rest of the country - Some think that a state like Florida, with a diverse population in lots of different areas, should be 1st in line.  Think that would give a better measure of who likes who in the initial primary.  New Hampshire isn't much different as far as mirroring the country.


Closer to the people? You must mean closer to the people at Harvard and NASA because I've been reading the Wiki page on the Iowa Caucuses for half-an-hour and have no idea what they're talking about.

 

New Hampshire doesn't mirror the country either, but at least it's one citizen one vote.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


It is one citizen (registered voter) - one vote in the Iowa Caucuses too.  It is just a more hands own community event than going into a voting booth all by your lonesome.  It is done in rounds right there in the individual pricincts - think there were about 1700 of them in bars(no drinks served), local restaurants, municipal buildings, homes, churches, schools - different sizes based on the population of the area.

 

Rules are set by the Party and the rules are gone over after everybody has arrived by a specific time.

  • They arrive and register or are checked off if previously registered
  • They fill out a piece of paper indicating their candidate choice or undecided
  • They divide up the room for each of the candidates - you go over to where your choice is set up
  • Depending upon the total registered # in the entire room, a 15% margin is set (that's the % used for this caucus).  If the candidate's crowd does not meet the 15% viable margin, that candidate is out and their crowd is woo'd by those candidates that have met the margin.
  • Lots of discussion, selling of the candidates on issues and other qualification to get your neighbor to come on over to your viable candidate.  Yes, you can also convince others or they can convince you.
  • Then there is another vote - another count of how many are standing with a particular candidate's group - yes, some people leave before this count - they may not want to pick another candidate
  • The final number by candidate is recorded by the official and reported - think they report by county and the county is suppose to report to the state.

It is loud, the media loves it because they can get all their demographics of the crowd before the end result is known.  There was a great turn out this year - weather was great and people were pumped for their candidate, if they had decided at that point.

 

What better way than neighbor talking to neighbor about their preference.

Would it work everywhere - I doubt that, but in contrast to the normal way, it shows lots more dedication to me. 


There is a better way and that is to have an election where people can vote over a 2 week period on who they want. Iowa does nothing but decrease the number of people who will take part, and a lot of rules are made up on site. The Iowa way is one of the best methods to decrease the number taking part in our elections there is. I am surprised GA does not use the Iowa system as the current Gov. should love it. The Iowa way is a media event and serves no other useful purpose than to decrease the number of people taking part. The Iowa way should be thrown into the ash can of history

Honored Social Butterfly

I am not planning on saying which way is better, but what we saw was a disaster.
I am concerned that many will simply not be too sure as to the results and if they are really what they say they are. and that is the biggest danger that this Democracy can have. no faith in our voting system.
I do agree that Iowa does not represent what this country has become. and they should simply be another state in Super Tuesday.
But now the Democratic Party will have to be very careful on how the other States conduct their primaries. because Iowa will have an effect on Independents and Republicans that want to vote to get Trump out.

 

 

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Another failure by the Democrats.  They can't even run a caucus properly.

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@NOTHAPPENING wrote:

Another failure by the Democrats.  They can't even run a caucus properly.


I don't know if that is a true statement at all, but  I will concede that its not been a pretty sight.
One thing that Democrats should look. Mayor Pete winning in Iowa? what those that mean?  What are Iowans saying?  I could provide my opinion but I will let others do so.

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