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Honored Social Butterfly

In 20 yrs 1/2 the population will live in 8 states

In about 20 years, half the population will live in just eight states

 

The Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service of the University of Virginia analyzed Census Bureau population projections to estimate each state’s likely population in 2040, including the expected breakdown of the population by age and gender. Although that data was released in 2016, before the bureau revised its estimates for the coming decades, we see that, in fact, the population will be heavily centered in a few states.

 

Eight states will have just under half of the total population of the country, 49.5 percent, according to the Weldon Cooper Center’s estimate. The next eight most populous states will account for an additional fifth of the population, up to 69.2 percent — meaning that the 16 most populous states will be home to about 70 percent of Americans.

 

Geographically, most of those 16 states will be on or near the East Coast. Only three — Arizona, Texas and Colorado — will be west of the Mississippi and not on the West Coast.

 

 

Ornstein’s (and Waldman’s) point is clear: 30 percent of the population of the country will control 68 percent of the seats in the U.S. Senate. Or, more starkly, half the population of the country will control 84 percent of those seats.

 

His tweet goes further, suggesting that the demographics of those states will differ from the larger states, as well, and, therefore, so will their politics.

 

It’s self-evident that the 34 smaller states will be more rural than the 16 largest; a key part of the reason those states will be so much more populous is the centralization of Americans in cities. It’s true, too, that this movement to cities has reinforced partisan divisions in a process called the Big Sort.

 

The Weldon Cooper data, though, is less stark on the age differential. Eleven of the 16 most-populous states will have over-65 populations that are below the median density nationally. Twenty-two of the 34 less-populous states will have over-65 populations that are over the median density.

 

In the current political context, older voters means more Republican voters. By 2040, though, those 65-year-olds will be Generation X, a generation that currently skews more Democratic than the two generations that preceded it, according to a March study from the Pew Research Center. By 2046, even some millennials — a group that is much more Democratic-leaning — will be at retirement age (!!!).

 

 

 

 

In about 20 years, half the population will live in eight states

 

So, it may be time to amend the Constitution after all.....ya think?


"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in DC, 1/27/2017
Honored Social Butterfly

   This is why popular vote should matter, if we are to remain a democratic republic.   

    Note, the author of most threads that are fact oriented contain an imbedded link so that the individual reading can be assured of the factual basis for the data being discussed.  Or google the titile.  

PRO-LIFE is Affordable Healthcare for ALL .
Honored Social Butterfly


@afisher wrote:

   This is why popular vote should matter, if we are to remain a democratic republic.   

    Note, the author of most threads that are fact oriented contain an imbedded link so that the individual reading can be assured of the factual basis for the data being discussed.  Or google the titile.  


Yep, and this topic does have a link.

 

Interestingly one of the carts contained in the link shows that by 2040, 30% of the population will control 84% of the seats in the Senate. That is astonishingly lopsided. Looks like this population shift will not only antiquate the Electoral Vote Process but will also antiquate the way we appropriate the number of Senators per state. What the chart shows will hardly be anything near equal representation.


Man learns from history that man learns nothing from history.
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That's your opinion, I enjoy having a job and the stock market.

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Honored Social Butterfly


@DavidW130894 wrote:

That's your opinion, I enjoy having a job and the stock market.


Then you better vote to get tRump out of office before it all crashes. Income and Wealth disparity are growing under tRump at an accelerated rate and even though unemployment numbers decreased, homeless numbers are steadily growing and the middle class is shrinking. Meanwhile the debt is growing exponentially. This is unsustainable.  No "opinion" here, just facts.

 

In reality, the point of this old topic that you dug up clearly shows the need for the electoral vote to be abolished. Thanks for bringing it back up !


Man learns from history that man learns nothing from history.
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Where are you getting your facts from so I can check it out.

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Honored Social Butterfly


@DavidW130894 wrote:

Where are you getting your facts from so I can check it out.


Where are you getting your facts so I can "check them out"?

 

Did you even read the article posted in the old topic you brought back into conversation? Perhaps you should.


Man learns from history that man learns nothing from history.
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Honored Social Butterfly

There's a definite risk of losing democracy here, for sure, @mickstuder.  Democracies are relatively fragile, all things considered.   We need to work to keep it going. 

Honored Social Butterfly

That means that 50% of the population would have only 16% of the votes in the senate, and only 16% of the electoral votes for president. I understand that the low pop states would not like to give up their advantage here, but is it fair? The electoral college is the reason we are stuck with our horrible excuse for a president.

Honored Social Butterfly


@xrepub wrote:

That means that 50% of the population would have only 16% of the votes in the senate, and only 16% of the electoral votes for president. I understand that the low pop states would not like to give up their advantage here, but is it fair? The electoral college is the reason we are stuck with our horrible excuse for a president.


I feel better with the majority of states having an advantage in the Senate than I do the electoral college advantage.  

 

Although that whole system was put in place when we were 80%+ agrarian.  Now we are 80%+ urban.    And practially speaking, liberal policies are what work best for urban, densely populated, diverse areas.   The lopsided Senate may be very detrimental to that. 

Honored Social Butterfly

Yes, I'd like to do away with the electoral college.  I don't know how possible that is, though. 

 

Let's see how liberal my generation (Gen X) stays as we age.   

 

But I don't know how liberal the millenials are.   They seem to be more sexist than my generation.   If you view half the human population as inferior, there is still a big problem.  I'm more hopeful about MY kids' generation -- Generation Z.  e.g. Emma Gonzalez.   

 

"Only 41% of Millennial men were comfortable with women engineers, compared to 65% of men 65 or older. Likewise, only 43% of Millennial men were comfortable with women being U.S. senators, compared to 64% of Americans overall. (The numbers were 39% versus 61% for women being CEOs of Fortune 500 companies, and 35% versus 57% for president of the United States.)"

 

https://hbr.org/2016/06/are-u-s-millennial-men-just-as-sexist-as-their-dads

Honored Social Butterfly


@Centristsin2010 wrote:

In about 20 years, half the population will live in just eight states

 

The Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service of the University of Virginia analyzed Census Bureau population projections to estimate each state’s likely population in 2040, including the expected breakdown of the population by age and gender. Although that data was released in 2016, before the bureau revised its estimates for the coming decades, we see that, in fact, the population will be heavily centered in a few states.

 

Eight states will have just under half of the total population of the country, 49.5 percent, according to the Weldon Cooper Center’s estimate. The next eight most populous states will account for an additional fifth of the population, up to 69.2 percent — meaning that the 16 most populous states will be home to about 70 percent of Americans.

 

Geographically, most of those 16 states will be on or near the East Coast. Only three — Arizona, Texas and Colorado — will be west of the Mississippi and not on the West Coast.

 

 

Ornstein’s (and Waldman’s) point is clear: 30 percent of the population of the country will control 68 percent of the seats in the U.S. Senate. Or, more starkly, half the population of the country will control 84 percent of those seats.

 

His tweet goes further, suggesting that the demographics of those states will differ from the larger states, as well, and, therefore, so will their politics.

 

It’s self-evident that the 34 smaller states will be more rural than the 16 largest; a key part of the reason those states will be so much more populous is the centralization of Americans in cities. It’s true, too, that this movement to cities has reinforced partisan divisions in a process called the Big Sort.

 

The Weldon Cooper data, though, is less stark on the age differential. Eleven of the 16 most-populous states will have over-65 populations that are below the median density nationally. Twenty-two of the 34 less-populous states will have over-65 populations that are over the median density.

 

In the current political context, older voters means more Republican voters. By 2040, though, those 65-year-olds will be Generation X, a generation that currently skews more Democratic than the two generations that preceded it, according to a March study from the Pew Research Center. By 2046, even some millennials — a group that is much more Democratic-leaning — will be at retirement age (!!!).

 

 

 

 

In about 20 years, half the population will live in eight states

 

So, it may be time to amend the Constitution after all.....ya think?


After this Presidential term is completed - the entire population of the USA will live in a Country called Russia previously known in this location as the USA - what state they live in won;t matter then

 

 

 

 

( " China if You're Listening - Get Trumps Tax Returns " )

" )
" - Anonymous

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