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Valued Social Butterfly
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Re: Immigration, Drought, Climate Change

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@gordyfl wrote:

guatamala drought.png

 

“This is the worst drought we’ve ever had,” says Méndez López of Guatamala, toeing the parched earth with the tip of his boot. “We’ve lost absolutely everything. If things don’t improve, we’ll be forced to migrate somewhere else. We can’t go on like this.”


Data from Customs and Border Patrol show a massive increase in the number migrants from Central America’s Dry Corridor, which stretches through Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador.
Guatemala is consistently listed among the world’s 10 most vulnerable nations to the effects of climate change.

Increasingly erratic climate patterns have produced year after year of failed harvests and dwindling work opportunities across the country, forcing more and more people like Méndez López to consider migration in a last-ditch effort to escape skyrocketing levels of food insecurity and poverty.


Today, towards the end of yet another “rainy season” that brought no rain, many rural communities seem trapped in a dizzying vortex of catastrophe.


As hunger pushes desperate parents to resort to extreme measures in order to feed their families, robberies and violent assaults have skyrocketed.

“People from our own community are starting to go out and rob people, because it’s their only option,” says Marco Antonio Vásquez, a community leader of the village of El Ingeniero in Chiquimula.


Those with homes or small plots of land use them as collateral to pay human smugglers known as “coyotes” between $10,000 and $15,000 USD in exchange for three chances to cross the border into the U.S.


But families from the poorest regions of the country are often forced to choose the option with the least guarantees and the highest risks—going alone, often with small children in tow.


Ernesto, who asked his name to be changed, looked weary as he waited in line to claim the small bag containing belongings that had been taken from him when he was intercepted at the U.S. Border.

His family in Guatemala had put their home and livelihood on the line, hoping he could make it across to find work in the U.S., which would allow him to support his family back home. This was the second time he had been deported.


“I have one chance left. If I don’t make it, we will really be in trouble.”


https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/2018/10/drought-climate-change-force-guatemalans-migr...

 


And the ToadPOTUS has declared his desire to eliminate US aid to Guatemala because the Government there hasn't done enough to stop people facing starvation from leaving and heading North.

 

Guess what's going to happen when global warming destroys the crops in other counties closer to the equator?

 

Republicans will say this is proof we need a BIG WALL and more ICE agents.

 

Our Lord disagrees.

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Valued Social Butterfly
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Re: Immigration, Drought, Climate Change

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Immigration, Drought, Climate Change

 

 

 

Europe is facing the same thing.

 

 

 

We really need to start thinking about sharing resources versus Herbert Hoover's Philosophy of Rugged Individualism.

 

 

We don't need to build walls, we need to build bridges.

 

 

The USA could feed Central America on what it throws away each day.

 

 

However we also need population control, we need family planning, not just in wealthy countries, but also poor countries.

 

 

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Re: Immigration, Drought, Climate Change

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Sad isn’t it. Knowing the variables but ignoring them and refusing to help others in the world. That’s not what our Country has been about, is it?

But, let’s help and support the ruthless dictators of the world, thanks donnie. 

Our president is a cruel, lying, self centered person, that does not deserve the position that he holds. Nor does the rest of the world deserve him. 

Climate change is happening, admit it!

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Re: Immigration, Drought, Climate Change

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Juxtaposition

 

 

spillway .png

 

 

 

drought .png

 

 

 

rainbow 1.png

 

 

 

 

( " China if You're Listening - Get Trumps Tax Returns " )

" )
" - Anonymous

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Immigration, Drought, Climate Change

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Message 5 of 5

guatamala drought.png

 

“This is the worst drought we’ve ever had,” says Méndez López of Guatamala, toeing the parched earth with the tip of his boot. “We’ve lost absolutely everything. If things don’t improve, we’ll be forced to migrate somewhere else. We can’t go on like this.”


Data from Customs and Border Patrol show a massive increase in the number migrants from Central America’s Dry Corridor, which stretches through Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador.
Guatemala is consistently listed among the world’s 10 most vulnerable nations to the effects of climate change.

Increasingly erratic climate patterns have produced year after year of failed harvests and dwindling work opportunities across the country, forcing more and more people like Méndez López to consider migration in a last-ditch effort to escape skyrocketing levels of food insecurity and poverty.


Today, towards the end of yet another “rainy season” that brought no rain, many rural communities seem trapped in a dizzying vortex of catastrophe.


As hunger pushes desperate parents to resort to extreme measures in order to feed their families, robberies and violent assaults have skyrocketed.

“People from our own community are starting to go out and rob people, because it’s their only option,” says Marco Antonio Vásquez, a community leader of the village of El Ingeniero in Chiquimula.


Those with homes or small plots of land use them as collateral to pay human smugglers known as “coyotes” between $10,000 and $15,000 USD in exchange for three chances to cross the border into the U.S.


But families from the poorest regions of the country are often forced to choose the option with the least guarantees and the highest risks—going alone, often with small children in tow.


Ernesto, who asked his name to be changed, looked weary as he waited in line to claim the small bag containing belongings that had been taken from him when he was intercepted at the U.S. Border.

His family in Guatemala had put their home and livelihood on the line, hoping he could make it across to find work in the U.S., which would allow him to support his family back home. This was the second time he had been deported.


“I have one chance left. If I don’t make it, we will really be in trouble.”


https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/2018/10/drought-climate-change-force-guatemalans-migr...

 

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