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Valued Social Butterfly
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Re: How to be a True Anti-Racist

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Message 31 of 33

Robin DiAngelo is often mentioned on different topics and has made a career out of white guilt. 

 

There is no doubt but that there is racism out there. Sadly, that reality has been used by some as a club to beat on others of a different political ideology - as an example Conservatives have been called racist purely based on their ideology which, in reality, has nothing to do with race - except to those who consider seeing people as people as racist.

 

To what degree a person espouses white guilt because of something in their past and how much as an "I'm better than you" gambit cannot be determined. However, here is an interesting perspective on "racism":

https://www.cnn.com/2016/09/29/opinions/im-black-and-struggle-with-implicit-bias-bailey/index.html

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Re: How to be a True Anti-Racist

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Message 32 of 33

Thank you for sharing this link, ManicPro.

 

"For students to understand race, Matias says, they must understand a concept called “whiteness,” which can be a touchy topic, especially for those who are unaware of or who haven’t fully considered the widely recognized social construct. The term refers to a collective group identity—which includes cultural values, norms, behaviors, and attitudes—that systemically offers privileges to people who appear white while marginalizing the culture and experiences of people of color. As a field of study, whiteness has been around since at least the time of W.E.B. Du Bois, the early 20th-century author and activist, but it wasn’t until white scholars began exploring the subject in the 1990s that the term was popularized and inspired more robust scholarship."

 

Ahhhh, "whiteness".....gives some the subconscious desire to attack anyone who raises the term racist/racism, misuse the term racism such as falsely claiming the term, "our black President...." as a racist phrase and insist "I have still not seen what those Trump racist policies are that "we" fear."  I also believe the excess defense of the police is an example of our society's "whiteness", attacking immigrants is another.  As is the "white guilt" chants from the Right.  It's far more obvious than some might believe.

 

It’s the skepticism people might unconsciously harbor when a person of color is leading a company meeting or the muted fear that might arise when a person of color walks past them on a darkened street. The heart of whiteness, though, is the implicit assumption that white culture and white perspectives are the norm against which everything else is judged. For many, it is so ubiquitous it’s largely unnoticed, in the same way a fish is so immersed in water it doesn’t realize it’s swimming in it—and that lack of awareness is precisely the problem

 

So, so true.....

 

That strong response actually has a name: white fragility, a phrase coined in 2011 by sociologist and diversity trainer Robin DiAngelo. When presented with the realities of racism and a system of privilege that favors white people, it’s not uncommon for whites to express anger, guilt, shame, fear, and defensiveness, all of which can shut down any meaningful dialogue about race. In other words, they take it personally.

 

WOW!  Sure describes several here, one in particular.  Sad thing is those that would benefit from this excellent article won't bother to read it, or, won't bother to try and understand it.  They don't tend to be the more open-minded adults.

 

Thanks again, ManicPro!

 


"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in Washington DC, January 21, 2017.
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How to be a True Anti-Racist

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Message 33 of 33

https://www.5280.com/2018/11/how-to-be-a-true-anti-racist/?fbclid=IwAR11v42SCOUIytRZhxTxLKcGgH9uJm9y...

 

 

 

 

“Cheryl Matias could see it happening. After all, she’d watched it unfold in her classrooms before. The man’s hand was gripping the table in front of him; his finger was pointed, accusingly, in her direction. His face reddened dramatically. He spat the words “racist” and “sexist” at her and asked why she was so intent on talking about race when it wasn’t supposed to matter.

 

...

 

 

Matias was hired by CU Denver in 2010 to teach education students about how race can impact the way teachers relate to their students—and vice versa. She was disheartened to find, however, that despite signing up for her courses, some of her students didn’t seem to want to talk about race at all. In fact, she says, the subject matter often elicited heated reactions, like the one she’d just described to me. “If I were in my neuroscience class, it would not be acceptable for me to yell at the professor and tell him he’s wrong just because I don’t believe in neurons,” Matias says. “How can someone who says they’re colorblind—they don’t see race at all, race is not a real thing—be having an obviously visceral experience, shaking, defensive, crying? If it’s nothing, why are you having a reaction to it?”

 

“For students to understand race, Matias says, they must understand a concept called “whiteness,” which can be a touchy topic, especially for those who are unaware of or who haven’t fully considered the widely recognized social construct. The term refers to a collective group identity—which includes cultural values, norms, behaviors, and attitudes—that systemically offers privileges to people who appear white while marginalizing the culture and experiences of people of color. As a field of study, whiteness has been around since at least the time of W.E.B. Du Bois, the early 20th-century author and activist, but it wasn’t until white scholars began exploring the subject in the 1990s that the term was popularized and inspired more robust scholarship.”

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