Protect your digital identity with AARP’s fraud resource center. Try it today!

Reply
Valued Social Butterfly
0
Kudos
108
Views

Re: GOP House Voted 50+ Times 2 Kill Pre-existing Conditons

108 Views
Message 1 of 9

@mickstuder wrote:


 

Talk to AARP - it's a absurd that the Title Line limits characters to 50 so your forced to post goofy titles

Creativity, Ol' Son, creativity.

 

What's more Goofy is Trump Tweeting that it's the Republicans trying to save Pre-existing conditions in Health Insurance but the Democrats are trying to repeal it

 

How people who support Trump can listen to this kind of stuff & just ignore it

 

How do you do that Ray?

What you are overlooking is that they didn't vote against the concept but against the specific legislation. As I posted, how to do it is the hard part. For example, you can't tell the insurance companies they have to pick up the bill for a 47 year old who never paid a nickle in. As I have also posted - I am for the individual mandate but I'm sure you can how the Republicans would have a problem with that. The original problem was created by the Courts - maybe they will solve it (although I must admit, I can't see how).

 

 


 

Report Inappropriate Content
0
Kudos
108
Views
Treasured Social Butterfly
0
Kudos
115
Views

Re: GOP House Voted 50+ Times 2 Kill Pre-existing Conditons

115 Views
Message 2 of 9

@rk9152 wrote:

This is a truly goofy topic - you cannot kill pre-existent conditions. 
But wouldn't it be great if you could??

 

Interestingly, the mandate was the only part of Obamcare that I liked. In an environment where healthcate cannot be denied, we must require that those able to do so provide their own insurance.

 

The problem become how to do it within the context of free market capitalism (to the extent possible with regulations). 

 

 


Talk to AARP - it's a absurd that the Title Line limits characters to 50 so your forced to post goofy titles

 

What's more Goofy is Trump Tweeting that it's the Republicans trying to save Pre-existing conditions in Health Insurance but the Democrats are trying to repeal it

 

How people who support Trump can listen to this kind of stuff & just ignore it

 

How do you do that Ray?

 

 

( " China if You're Listening - Get Trumps Tax Returns " )

" )
" - Anonymous

Report Inappropriate Content
0
Kudos
115
Views
Valued Social Butterfly
0
Kudos
121
Views

Re: GOP House Voted 50+ Times 2 Kill Pre-existing Conditons

121 Views
Message 3 of 9

This is a truly goofy topic - you cannot kill pre-existent conditions. 
But wouldn't it be great if you could??

 

Interestingly, the mandate was the only part of Obamcare that I liked. In an environment where healthcate cannot be denied, we must require that those able to do so provide their own insurance.

 

The problem become how to do it within the context of free market capitalism (to the extent possible with regulations). 

 

 

Report Inappropriate Content
0
Kudos
121
Views
Valued Social Butterfly
1
Kudos
148
Views

Re: GOP House Voted 50+ Times 2 Kill Pre-existing Conditons

148 Views
Message 4 of 9

The GOPers no longer want to end coverage for pre-existing conditions under Obamacare. Instead they cravenly used the Budget Reconcilliation Act to remove the mandate that everyone either get health insurance or pay a fine.

 

The Insurance Industry made a persuasive case when they PPACA was being written that WITHOUT a mandate for everyone to have insurance, they would not be able to "afford" the coverage of pre-existing conditions and keep health insurance affordable.

 

So by eliminating the mandate, Der Trumper and the GOPerLords killed Obamacare - it will just take awhile for "the corpse to fall over" as premiums climb beyond the reach of 34 million Americans who get their health Insurance through PPACA.

 

Realizing nobody noticed what they did to PPACA (and the 34 million Americans who will have NO insurance plus the millions more with pre-existing conditions), now the GOPerLords are becoming more open in their drive to end Social Security and Medicare as SOCIALISM that must be destroyed.

 

If you don't want this to happen, VOTE OUT THE NRAGOP IN NOVEMBER

 

There is no other way to EVER improve our health care system.

Report Inappropriate Content
1
Kudos
148
Views
Valued Social Butterfly
0
Kudos
151
Views

Re: GOP House Voted 50+ Times 2 Kill Pre-existing Conditons

151 Views
Message 5 of 9

  According to KFF ( Kaiser Family Foundation) Healthcare is the major concern among voters in 2018.    Many of the GOP are not willing to even discuss healthcare when they rarely show up for townhall events.    The wus in my City has ads out that say that he voted NO to get rid of ACA and fails to mention that was a committee vote ( which passed) and then voted YES when the vote was taken by the entire Congress.      Hopefully he will be replaced.  

 

That and another interesting point is that more and more people are "contract" employees that get no benefits.   When Donald talks about better benefits he is hoping that no one knows that corporations are all engaging in decreasing the number of hires who do get health insurance.    The latest figure is 36% of working people are 'contract" employees, who have no insurance benefit or no way to obtain a HSA savings account ( which is the newest Donald bait / switch).     

PRO-LIFE is Affordable Healthcare for ALL .
Report Inappropriate Content
0
Kudos
151
Views
Treasured Social Butterfly
1
Kudos
168
Views

Re: GOP House Voted 50+ Times 2 Kill Pre-existing Conditons

168 Views
Message 6 of 9

On July 27, 2017, the Health Care Freedom Act, also known as the "skinny repeal", was introduced. This bill was defeated 49–51, with Republican senators Susan Collins, John McCain, and Lisa Murkowski voting against it along with all the Democrats and Independents.[53]

 

On September 13, 2017, an amendment to the American Health Care Act, commonly known as Graham-Cassidy, was submitted. The bill was sponsored by Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, with Bill Cassidy of Louisiana as a co-sponsor.[54] A spokesman for the Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said that a vote was planned to occur before September 30th, which was the deadline to pass bills under budget reconciliation.[55][56][57] Rand Paul and John McCain indicated that they would vote against the bill.[58] Ultimately, McConnell announced on September 26th that the Senate would not vote on the Graham-Cassidy bill.[59]

 

 

Source - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Efforts_to_repeal_the_Patient_Protection_and_Affordable_Care_Act

 

 

 

 

 

( " China if You're Listening - Get Trumps Tax Returns " )

" )
" - Anonymous

Report Inappropriate Content
1
Kudos
168
Views
Highlighted
Treasured Social Butterfly
1
Kudos
169
Views

Re: GOP House Voted 50+ Times 2 Kill Pre-existing Conditons

169 Views
Message 7 of 9

@mickstuder wrote:

@mickstuder wrote:

The following is a list of efforts to repeal the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (commonly called the "Affordable Care Act (ACA)" or "Obamacare"), which had been enacted by the 111th United States Congress on March 23, 2010.

 

Republicans Attempts to Eliminate Pre-existing Conditons over the last 4 years

 

112th Congress (2011–2012)

In 2011, after Republicans gained control of the House of Representatives, one of the first votes held was on a bill titled "Repealing the Job-Killing Health Care Law Act" (H.R. 2), which the House passed 245–189.[3]

 

All Republicans and 3 Democrats voted for repeal.[4] House Democrats proposed an amendment that repeal not take effect until a majority of the Senators and Representatives had opted out of the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program;

 

Republicans voted down the measure.[5] In the Senate, the bill was offered as an amendment to an unrelated bill, but was voted down.[6] President Obama had stated that he would have vetoed the bill even if it had passed both chambers of Congress.[7]

 

Following the 2012 Supreme Court ruling upholding ACA as constitutional, Republicans held another vote to repeal the law on July 11;[8] the House of Representatives voted with all 244 Republicans and 5 Democrats in favor of repeal, which marked the 33rd, partial or whole, repeal attempt.[9][10]

 

113th Congress (2013–2014)

In January 2013, Republicans introduced An act to repeal the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act in the United States House of Representatives.[11]

2013 federal government shutdown

Main article: United States federal government shutdown of 2013

Strong partisan disagreement in Congress prevented adjustments to the Act's provisions.[12]

 

However, at least one change, a proposed repeal of a tax on medical devices, has received bipartisan support.[13] Some Congressional Republicans argued against improvements to the law on the grounds they would weaken the arguments for repeal.[14][15]

 

Republicans attempted to defund its implementation,[16][17] and in October 2013, House

 

Republicans refused to fund the federal government unless accompanied with a delay in ACA implementation, after the President unilaterally deferred the employer mandate by one year, which critics claimed he had no power to do.

 

The House passed three versions of a bill funding the government while submitting various versions that would repeal or delay ACA, with the last version delaying enforcement of the individual mandate. The Democratic Senate leadership stated the Senate would only pass a "clean" funding bill without any restrictions on ACA.

 

The government shutdown began on October 1.[18][19][20] Senate Republicans threatened to block appointments to relevant agencies, such as the Independent Payment Advisory Board[21] and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.[22][23]

 

 


114th Congress (2015–2016)

On February 3, 2015, the House of Representatives added its 67th repeal vote to the record (239 to 186). This attempt also failed.[24]

 

The House passed the Restoring Americans' Healthcare Freedom Reconciliation Act of 2015[25] on October 23, 2015 under the FY2016 budget reconciliation process, which prevents the possibility of a filibuster in the Senate.

 

The bill would have partially repealed the provisions of the Affordable Care Act, notably the individual and employer mandates as well as the taxes on Cadillac insurance plans. Some conservatives in both the House and Senate opposed the bill because it did not completely repeal the Affordable Care Act, which would have been inconsistent with the rules governing budget reconciliation bills.[26]

 

The bill was the 61st time that the House had voted to fully or partially repeal the Affordable Care act. The bill also would have removed federal funding for Planned Parenthood for one year. The bill was expected to be vetoed by President Obama should it pass the Senate.[27]

 

In early December, the Senate passed an amended version of the healthcare reconciliation bill, sending it back to the House.[28][29] It was passed by the House on January 6, 2016, and vetoed by

 

President Obama on January 8, only the sixth veto of his presidency.[30] The House failed to override the President's veto on February on a vote of 241–186, which did not meet the required two-thirds supermajority.[31]

 

In January 2017, the Congressional Budget Office submitted its report on the estimated impact on insurance coverage and premiums with the repeal of ACA through H.R. 3762, the Restoring Americans’ Healthcare Freedom Reconciliation Act of 2015.[32] The report completed with input from the Joint Committee on Taxation estimated that 18 million more people would be uninsured in the first year after the repeal and by 2026, the number would rise to 32 million.[32]:1 For those who are not part of a group plan, premiums would increase by up to 25% in the first year, and by 2026 would double.[32]:1

 

 


115th Congress (2017–2018)

Main article: 2017 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act replacement proposals

 

On January 12, 2017, the Senate voted 51 to 48 to pass an FY2017 budget resolution, S.Con.Res. 3, that contained language allowing the repeal of the Affordable Care Act through the budget reconciliation process, which disallows a filibuster in the Senate.[33][34][35][36][1] In spite of efforts during the vote-a-rama (a proceeding in which each amendment was considered and voted upon for about 10 minutes each until all 160 were completed) that continued into the early hours of the morning, Democrats could not prevent "the GOP from following through on its repeal plans."[35][37]

 

On January 20, 2017, Donald Trump was sworn in as President of the United States. Trump and many Republicans have vowed to repeal and replace Obamacare.[38] President Trump signed an executive order on January 20, 2017, his first day in office, that according to then White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer would "ease the burden of Obamacare as we transition from repeal and replace". Spicer would not elaborate further when asked for more details.[39][40][41]

 

On March 6, 2017, House Republicans announced their replacement for the ACA, the American Health Care Act.[42] The bill was withdrawn on March 24, 2017 after it was certain that the House would fail to garner enough votes to pass it.[43] The result was in-fighting within the Republican Party.[44]

 

On May 4, 2017, the United States House of Representatives voted to pass the American Health Care Act (and thereby repeal most of the Affordable Care Act) by a narrow margin of 217 to 213, sending the bill to the Senate for deliberation.[50] The Senate indicated they would write their own version of the bill, instead of voting on the House version.[51] On June 22, the Better Care Reconciliation Act of 2017 was unveiled.

 

On July 25, 2017, the United States Senate voted to proceed to debate on the American Health Care Act. The Senate voted 50-50, largely along party lines with the Republicans for and the Democrats against proceeding, requiring Vice President Pence to cast the tie-breaking vote. Republican Senators Susan Collins of Maine and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska crossed the aisle to vote against the motion.[52]

 

 Source - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Efforts_to_repeal_the_Patient_Protection_and_Affordable_Care_Act

( " China if You're Listening - Get Trumps Tax Returns " )

" )
" - Anonymous

Report Inappropriate Content
1
Kudos
169
Views
Treasured Social Butterfly
0
Kudos
170
Views

Re: GOP House Voted 50+ Times 2 Kill Pre-existing Conditons

170 Views
Message 8 of 9

@mickstuder wrote:

The following is a list of efforts to repeal the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (commonly called the "Affordable Care Act (ACA)" or "Obamacare"), which had been enacted by the 111th United States Congress on March 23, 2010.

 

Republicans Attempts to Eliminate Pre-existing Conditons over the last 4 years

 

112th Congress (2011–2012)

In 2011, after Republicans gained control of the House of Representatives, one of the first votes held was on a bill titled "Repealing the Job-Killing Health Care Law Act" (H.R. 2), which the House passed 245–189.[3]

 

All Republicans and 3 Democrats voted for repeal.[4] House Democrats proposed an amendment that repeal not take effect until a majority of the Senators and Representatives had opted out of the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program;

 

Republicans voted down the measure.[5] In the Senate, the bill was offered as an amendment to an unrelated bill, but was voted down.[6] President Obama had stated that he would have vetoed the bill even if it had passed both chambers of Congress.[7]

 

Following the 2012 Supreme Court ruling upholding ACA as constitutional, Republicans held another vote to repeal the law on July 11;[8] the House of Representatives voted with all 244 Republicans and 5 Democrats in favor of repeal, which marked the 33rd, partial or whole, repeal attempt.[9][10]

 

113th Congress (2013–2014)

In January 2013, Republicans introduced An act to repeal the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act in the United States House of Representatives.[11]

2013 federal government shutdown

Main article: United States federal government shutdown of 2013

Strong partisan disagreement in Congress prevented adjustments to the Act's provisions.[12]

 

However, at least one change, a proposed repeal of a tax on medical devices, has received bipartisan support.[13] Some Congressional Republicans argued against improvements to the law on the grounds they would weaken the arguments for repeal.[14][15]

 

Republicans attempted to defund its implementation,[16][17] and in October 2013, House

 

Republicans refused to fund the federal government unless accompanied with a delay in ACA implementation, after the President unilaterally deferred the employer mandate by one year, which critics claimed he had no power to do.

 

The House passed three versions of a bill funding the government while submitting various versions that would repeal or delay ACA, with the last version delaying enforcement of the individual mandate. The Democratic Senate leadership stated the Senate would only pass a "clean" funding bill without any restrictions on ACA.

 

The government shutdown began on October 1.[18][19][20] Senate Republicans threatened to block appointments to relevant agencies, such as the Independent Payment Advisory Board[21] and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.[22][23]

 

 


114th Congress (2015–2016)

On February 3, 2015, the House of Representatives added its 67th repeal vote to the record (239 to 186). This attempt also failed.[24]

 

The House passed the Restoring Americans' Healthcare Freedom Reconciliation Act of 2015[25] on October 23, 2015 under the FY2016 budget reconciliation process, which prevents the possibility of a filibuster in the Senate.

 

The bill would have partially repealed the provisions of the Affordable Care Act, notably the individual and employer mandates as well as the taxes on Cadillac insurance plans. Some conservatives in both the House and Senate opposed the bill because it did not completely repeal the Affordable Care Act, which would have been inconsistent with the rules governing budget reconciliation bills.[26]

 

The bill was the 61st time that the House had voted to fully or partially repeal the Affordable Care act. The bill also would have removed federal funding for Planned Parenthood for one year. The bill was expected to be vetoed by President Obama should it pass the Senate.[27]

 

In early December, the Senate passed an amended version of the healthcare reconciliation bill, sending it back to the House.[28][29] It was passed by the House on January 6, 2016, and vetoed by

 

President Obama on January 8, only the sixth veto of his presidency.[30] The House failed to override the President's veto on February on a vote of 241–186, which did not meet the required two-thirds supermajority.[31]

 

In January 2017, the Congressional Budget Office submitted its report on the estimated impact on insurance coverage and premiums with the repeal of ACA through H.R. 3762, the Restoring Americans’ Healthcare Freedom Reconciliation Act of 2015.[32] The report completed with input from the Joint Committee on Taxation estimated that 18 million more people would be uninsured in the first year after the repeal and by 2026, the number would rise to 32 million.[32]:1 For those who are not part of a group plan, premiums would increase by up to 25% in the first year, and by 2026 would double.[32]:1

 

 Source - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Efforts_to_repeal_the_Patient_Protection_and_Affordable_Care_Act

( " China if You're Listening - Get Trumps Tax Returns " )

" )
" - Anonymous

Report Inappropriate Content
0
Kudos
170
Views
Treasured Social Butterfly
0
Kudos
171
Views
8
Replies

GOP House Voted 50+ Times 2 Kill Pre-existing Conditons

171 Views
Message 9 of 9

The following is a list of efforts to repeal the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (commonly called the "Affordable Care Act (ACA)" or "Obamacare"), which had been enacted by the 111th United States Congress on March 23, 2010.

 

Republicans Attempts to Eliminate Pre-existing Conditons over the last 4 years

 

In fact Republicans have tried so many times to eliminate the Pre-existing Conditons Protections - the documentation is SOoooooo Long it took 4 pages to post it

 

112th Congress (2011–2012)

In 2011, after Republicans gained control of the House of Representatives, one of the first votes held was on a bill titled "Repealing the Job-Killing Health Care Law Act" (H.R. 2), which the House passed 245–189.[3]

 

All Republicans and 3 Democrats voted for repeal.[4] House Democrats proposed an amendment that repeal not take effect until a majority of the Senators and Representatives had opted out of the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program;

 

Republicans voted down the measure.[5] In the Senate, the bill was offered as an amendment to an unrelated bill, but was voted down.[6] President Obama had stated that he would have vetoed the bill even if it had passed both chambers of Congress.[7]

 

Following the 2012 Supreme Court ruling upholding ACA as constitutional, Republicans held another vote to repeal the law on July 11;[8] the House of Representatives voted with all 244 Republicans and 5 Democrats in favor of repeal, which marked the 33rd, partial or whole, repeal attempt.[9][10]

 

113th Congress (2013–2014)

In January 2013, Republicans introduced An act to repeal the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act in the United States House of Representatives.[11]

2013 federal government shutdown

Main article: United States federal government shutdown of 2013

Strong partisan disagreement in Congress prevented adjustments to the Act's provisions.[12]

 

However, at least one change, a proposed repeal of a tax on medical devices, has received bipartisan support.[13] Some Congressional Republicans argued against improvements to the law on the grounds they would weaken the arguments for repeal.[14][15]

 

Republicans attempted to defund its implementation,[16][17] and in October 2013, House

 

Republicans refused to fund the federal government unless accompanied with a delay in ACA implementation, after the President unilaterally deferred the employer mandate by one year, which critics claimed he had no power to do.

 

The House passed three versions of a bill funding the government while submitting various versions that would repeal or delay ACA, with the last version delaying enforcement of the individual mandate. The Democratic Senate leadership stated the Senate would only pass a "clean" funding bill without any restrictions on ACA.

 

The government shutdown began on October 1.[18][19][20] Senate Republicans threatened to block appointments to relevant agencies, such as the Independent Payment Advisory Board[21] and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.[22][23]

 

 Source - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Efforts_to_repeal_the_Patient_Protection_and_Affordable_Care_Act

( " China if You're Listening - Get Trumps Tax Returns " )

" )
" - Anonymous

Report Inappropriate Content
0
Kudos
171
Views
8
Replies
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Users
Announcements

Roundtable Discussion:
Ask questions and get advice from fellow entrepreneurs
Now through Nov. 22

Top Authors