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Honored Social Butterfly

DIY Printable Guns

https://www.wired.com/story/a-landmark-legal-shift-opens-pandoras-box-for-diy-guns/

 

Cody Wilson makes digital files that let anyone 3-D print untraceable guns. The government tried to stop him. He sued—and won.

 

Cody Wilson makes digital files that let anyone 3-D print untraceable guns. The government tried to stop him. He sued—and won

 

Full story at the link....interesting!!!

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Periodic Contributor

I've seen a good website dedicated to both DIY and paint guns here best auto paint gun. I think they hint on something as well 😏 Though the website is great in general.

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Honored Social Butterfly


@JohnoL2608 wrote:

I've seen a good website dedicated to both DIY and paint guns here best auto paint gun. I think they hint on something as well 😏 Though the website is great in general.


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"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in DC, 1/27/2017
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Honored Social Butterfly

More Conservative fake news. The very idea that the ability to create a gun (IF you had the proper equipment and IF you had the proper training and IF you had the proper materials) somehow invalidates the idea of reasonable gun control and registration is moronic.  The same technologies are available in every other developed country and they do not have a problem enforcing their laws. 

Honored Social Butterfly


@Richva wrote:

 

More Conservative fake news.


Didn't read the source?  Wired is a good reading among technology fans.

 

Guess you also believe the earth is flat.

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Honored Social Butterfly

It really does not matter where the individual gets his gun(s).  When we get to the point of restricting individual ownership of firearms, it will be the possession of the weapon that triggers the fines, incarceration, and loss of any licenses (Physician, hairdresser, plumber, etc.). 

 

The whole "people will still be able to get guns" argument played out in Australia when they restricted firearms.  Today, you can buy an AK 47 on the streets of Sydney for $10K or at your local gun store in American for $500.  Which country worries more about armed home invasions? In which country is an armed home invasion potentially profitable?

 

Australia has not had a mass shooting since they started restrictions.  They are almost unheard of in Europe and Canada for the same reason. 

 

OK, You can make a gun in your basement if you have the technology and the knowledge. You can also convert that AK 47 to full auto with technology and the proper knowledge.   

 

The argument is specious. 

 

 

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@Richva wrote:

 

OK, You can make a gun in your basement if you have the technology and the knowledge. You can also convert that AK 47 to full auto with technology and the proper knowledge.   

 


 


The more something is forbidden, the more attractive it becomes to own or to do.

 

In this case the program is in the public domain and can't be retrieved.

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@TxGrandpa2 wrote:

@Richva wrote:

 

OK, You can make a gun in your basement if you have the technology and the knowledge. You can also convert that AK 47 to full auto with technology and the proper knowledge.   

 


 


The more something is forbidden, the more attractive it becomes to own or to do.

 

In this case the program is in the public domain and can't be retrieved.


I guess that explains why we have so many illegal full auto firearms being sold on the black market?   Bank robbery and undocumented immigration are forbidden, perhaps we should legalize those as well?

 

Another incorrect bumper sticker argument from the gun nuts debunked.

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@Richva wrote:




I guess that explains why we have so many illegal full auto firearms being sold on the black market?   Bank robbery and undocumented immigration are forbidden, perhaps we should legalize those as well?

 

Another incorrect bumper sticker argument from the gun nuts debunked.


No, just another facetious post.  No relation.

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@TxGrandpa2 wrote:

@Richva wrote:




I guess that explains why we have so many illegal full auto firearms being sold on the black market?   Bank robbery and undocumented immigration are forbidden, perhaps we should legalize those as well?

 

Another incorrect bumper sticker argument from the gun nuts debunked.


No, just another facetious post.  No relation.


Ah, then you should have no problem explaining why no other developed county, the ones with strong controls on guns and regulations on ownership, have guns flooding their streets?  Guns are forbidden yet the floodgates your theory predicted have not opened. 

 

Why is that? Because the theory that people will do anything to own a gun is badly flawed and disproved by the real world. 

Honored Social Butterfly


@Richva wrote:


Ah, then you should have no problem explaining why no other developed county, the ones with strong controls on guns and regulations on ownership, have guns flooding their streets?  Guns are forbidden yet the floodgates your theory predicted have not opened. 

 

Why is that? Because the theory that people will do anything to own a gun is badly flawed and disproved by the real world. 


Still no cigar.  How can you say there is no strict controls in other countries?  It appears that guns are becoming a problem in Western Europe.

 

Now that this is taken care, have you any comment on DIY printable guns?  But of course like always you attempt to obfuscate and take topics off topic as always.

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@TxGrandpa2 wrote:

@Richva wrote:


Ah, then you should have no problem explaining why no other developed county, the ones with strong controls on guns and regulations on ownership, have guns flooding their streets?  Guns are forbidden yet the floodgates your theory predicted have not opened. 

 

Why is that? Because the theory that people will do anything to own a gun is badly flawed and disproved by the real world. 


Still no cigar.  How can you say there is no strict controls in other countries?  It appears that guns are becoming a problem in Western Europe.

 

Now that this is taken care, have you any comment on DIY printable guns?  But of course like always you attempt to obfuscate and take topics off topic as always.


Could you define "becoming a problem"?  That usually means one guy got a hunting rifle while drunk, shot AT a neighbor, and it made the newspapers in 4 countries because is it so rare.  Here, you need to take out more than 10 grade schoolers to get coverage state wide because it happens so often.   

 

I smell the distinctive scent of fake news again. 

Honored Social Butterfly


@Richva wrote:


Could you define "becoming a problem"?  That usually means one guy got a hunting rifle while drunk, shot AT a neighbor, and it made the newspapers in 4 countries because is it so rare.  Here, you need to take out more than 10 grade schoolers to get coverage state wide because it happens so often.   

 

I smell the distinctive scent of fake news again. 


 

Fake news?  Ask someone who is tech savvy if creating things are fake news.  But that phrase has become a chic thing to say when one wants discredit something. 

 

I doubt a guy would get drunk, decide to shoot up some place, so he goes into his shop, prints up a hunting rifle, then goes out and commits mayhem.  I'm guessing it would take several days to print up anything like this on a 3d printer.

 

The thing is that there is a program that is in the public domain, 3d printers are becoming more and more common, and how would printing up firearms be addressed.

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@TxGrandpa2 wrote:

@Richva wrote:


Could you define "becoming a problem"?  That usually means one guy got a hunting rifle while drunk, shot AT a neighbor, and it made the newspapers in 4 countries because is it so rare.  Here, you need to take out more than 10 grade schoolers to get coverage state wide because it happens so often.   

 

I smell the distinctive scent of fake news again. 


 

Fake news?  Ask someone who is tech savvy if creating things are fake news.  But that phrase has become a chic thing to say when one wants discredit something. 

 

I doubt a guy would get drunk, decide to shoot up some place, so he goes into his shop, prints up a hunting rifle, then goes out and commits mayhem.  I'm guessing it would take several days to print up anything like this on a 3d printer.

 

The thing is that there is a program that is in the public domain, 3d printers are becoming more and more common, and how would printing up firearms be addressed.


The horses have escaped - it's now too late to worry about the barn door...

 

Does an individual need a license to make a firearm for personal use? | Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, ...

 

 

44>dolt45
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@alferdpacker wrote:


The horses have escaped - it's now too late to worry about the barn door...

 

Does an individual need a license to make a firearm for personal use? | Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, ...

 

 


It might be so, but the fact is that the program is in the public domain so anyone can print as many guns as they want.  The process probably takes several days so it is doubtful that the country will be flooded with 'printed' firearms.

 

The Justice Department has given up any objections about the program because of free speech issues

 

These type printers are even used to 'print' hard to find auto parts.  As a self-described auto mechanic perhaps you'd find the process useful.

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@TxGrandpa2 wrote:

@alferdpacker wrote:


The horses have escaped - it's now too late to worry about the barn door...

 

Does an individual need a license to make a firearm for personal use? | Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, ...

 

 


It might be so, but the fact is that the program is in the public domain so anyone can print as many guns as they want.  The process probably takes several days so it is doubtful that the country will be flooded with 'printed' firearms.

 

The Justice Department has given up any objections about the program because of free speech issues

 

These type printers are even used to 'print' hard to find auto parts.  As a self-described auto mechanic perhaps you'd find the process useful.

 

Yep - I've done a considerable amount of wrench twisting over the years - as well as being a pretty good fabricating machinist...

Not just automobiles - held certifications for car, truck, 4wd, bus and motorcycle technician as well as certifications in welding and machining to encourage the guys in the shops to get certified.   Paid them more if they achieved and maintained certification...

Printing plastic parts will lower the cost of many replacement parts, as well as making small quantity runs of older/obsolete/antique parts more financially feasible...

 

However - back closer to being on topic...

I've made a couple of firearms, and thanks to specs and blueprints being available, I was able to make a replica of a Revolutionary War breech-loading flintlock Ferguson.

Back in the 70s and 80s when there were muzzle loader rendezvous and cannon shoots at the old abandoned Camp Hale site before some portions of it were restricted to to hazards from undetonated munitions, made a replica of a 2,75 inch Whitworth cannon and a homemade cannon that used bowling balls for projectiles.

 

Right now, the major shortcoming involved with the material printers use to print firearms is that they are not yet capable of printing metals as strong and durable as those used by firearms manufacturers.

 

So - right now, due to the limitations of the materials available to print a firearm would mean that a semi-automatic firearm would quite literally - break and become inoperable - explode in ones hands - or become inoperable due to excess heat before firing 20 rounds as fast as one could pull the trigger...

 

Even though investment casting is fairly easy - time consuming and relatively expensive machining and heat treating is still necessary...

 

That a citizen could inexpensively purchase limited right to make use of the programming, printer time, and materials to print a couple of .410 derringers for themselves and their significant other for personal self defense purposes is an attractive idea...

 

 

44>dolt45
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@alferdpacker wrote:

 

Yep - I've done a considerable amount of wrench twisting over the years - as well as being a pretty good fabricating machinist...

Not just automobiles - held certifications for car, truck, bus and motorcycle technician as well as certifications in welding and machining to encourage the guys in the shops to get certified.   Paid them more if they achieved and maintained certification.

Printing plastic parts will lower te cost of many replacement parts, as well as making small quantity runs of older/obsolete/antique parts more financially feasible...

 

However - back closer to being on topic...

I've made a couple of firearms, and thanks to specs and blueprints being available, I was able to make a replica of a Revolutionary War breech-loading flintlock Ferguson.

Back in the 70s and 80s when there were muzzle loader roundevous and cannon shoots at the old abandoned Camp Hale site before some portions of it were restricted to to hazards from undetonated munitions, made a replica of a 2,75 inch Whitworth cannon and a homemade cannon that used bowling balls for projectiles.


 

 


Of course!!!!

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@TxGrandpa2 wrote:

@alferdpacker wrote:

 

Yep - I've done a considerable amount of wrench twisting over the years - as well as being a pretty good fabricating machinist...

Not just automobiles - held certifications for car, truck, bus and motorcycle technician as well as certifications in welding and machining to encourage the guys in the shops to get certified.   Paid them more if they achieved and maintained certification.

Printing plastic parts will lower te cost of many replacement parts, as well as making small quantity runs of older/obsolete/antique parts more financially feasible...

 

However - back closer to being on topic...

I've made a couple of firearms, and thanks to specs and blueprints being available, I was able to make a replica of a Revolutionary War breech-loading flintlock Ferguson.

Back in the 70s and 80s when there were muzzle loader roundevous and cannon shoots at the old abandoned Camp Hale site before some portions of it were restricted to to hazards from undetonated munitions, made a replica of a 2,75 inch Whitworth cannon and a homemade cannon that used bowling balls for projectiles.


 

 


Of course!!!!


Bet your momma - like most mothers - told you that if you hold yourself that way too many times - you'll freeze that way

 

Just saying...

 

 "Of course" it's obvious to rational, logical, decent, and honorable patriotic American Citizens why you failed to copy the rest of my post...

 

"Right now, the major shortcoming involved with the material printers use to print firearms is that they are not yet capable of printing metals as strong and durable as those used by firearms manufacturers.

 

So - right now, due to the limitations of the materials available to print a firearm would mean that a semi-automatic firearm would quite literally - break and become inoperable - explode in ones hands - or become inoperable due to excess heat before firing 20 rounds as fast as one could pull the trigger...

 

Even though investment casting is fairly easy - time consuming and relatively expensive machining and heat treating is still necessary...

 

That a citizen could inexpensively purchase limited right to make use of the programming, printer time, and materials to print a couple of .410 derringers for themselves and their significant other for personal self defense purposes is an attractive idea..."

 

TOS does not allow me to post the reason ...

 

 

44>dolt45
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@alferdpacker wrote:

 

So - right now, due to the limitations of the materials available to print a firearm would mean that a semi-automatic firearm would quite literally - break and become inoperable - explode in ones hands - or become inoperable due to excess heat before firing 20 rounds as fast as one could pull the trigger...

 


Yet the article showed that it can be done.  Nothing said about semi-automatics.


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@TxGrandpa2 wrote:

@alferdpacker wrote:

 

So - right now, due to the limitations of the materials available to print a firearm would mean that a semi-automatic firearm would quite literally - break and become inoperable - explode in ones hands - or become inoperable due to excess heat before firing 20 rounds as fast as one could pull the trigger...

 


Yet the article showed that it can be done.  Nothing said about semi-automatics.



Yes it has been done - with relatively low energy rounds like .380 (9mm short) and some shotgun cartridges which are also relatively low pressure cartridges.

 

 

I was pointing out what anyone possessing any significant amount of knowledge of how firearms work would recognize as fact leading to recognition that limitations of strength and thermal stability of current printer materials make it not currently possible to print a reliable AR, AK, M4, 1911, M9, or Sig P320 - including the obvious fact that a printed barrel would have to be replaced nearly every round...

The century old low pressure 45ACP round might be able to be used in a printed firearm...

 

Will a printed firearm be used to commit any mass murders in the near future?  

Probably not for a while yet...

 

 

44>dolt45
Honored Social Butterfly


@alferdpacker wrote:




I was pointing out what anyone possessing any significant amount of knowledge of how firearms work would recognize as fact leading to recognition that limitations of strength and thermal stability of current printer materials


Apparently you didn't bother to read the article where this is still in the developmental stages where stronger materials are yet to come?  But it did give a chance to show off your 'superior' knowledge didn't it?

 

I'm not as interested in DIY firearms as much as the advancements in computer technology of which I started out with card processing equipment where we were required to memorize how to read the punches on the IBM cards.  I got into the habit of reading the punches instead of the printed portion at the top of the card.


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