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Re: Convicted of Crimes, But Still Policing

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  We need to remember that the Police "unions" are not ln any way shape of form close to Unions that most Americans support, they are entities that shield their own from the public.  In today's world that are much more right-leaning entities.   

    

   That and it is the taxpayers who pick up the tab for all these killer cops.   

PRO-LIFE is Affordable Healthcare for ALL .
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Re: Convicted of Crimes, But Still Policing

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@Centristsin2010 wrote:

Shielded By The Badge

 

Convicted, but still policing

 

Over the past two decades, hundreds of Minnesota law enforcement officers have been convicted of criminal offenses. Most were never disciplined by the state.

 

Jared Taylor choked a man until he blacked out.

 

Steven Brown fired a .38 Special during a confrontation with his fiancée.

 

Tom Bernardson punched a man so viciously that he put him in the hospital with a concussion.

 

All three were convicted in Minnesota courts.

 

And all three still work in law enforcement.

 

They are among hundreds of sworn officers in Minnesota who were convicted of criminal offenses in the past two decades yet kept their state law enforcement licenses, according to public records examined by the Star Tribune. Dozens of them are still on the job with a badge, a gun and the public’s trust that they will uphold the law.

 

The cases reveal a state licensing system that is failing repeatedly to hold officers accountable for reckless, sometimes violent, conduct.

 

In Minnesota, doctors and lawyers can lose their professional licenses for conduct that is unethical or unprofessional — even if they never break a law. Yet law enforcement officers can stay on the job for years even when a judge or jury finds them guilty of criminal behavior.

 

 

“The public needs to trust that those officers are going to be held accountable.”

 

Records also show that scores of the convictions stemmed from off-duty misconduct — including brawls, stalking and domestic altercations — that raise questions about an officer’s temperament for a job that authorizes the use of force.

 

Law enforcement leaders say it’s important for citizens to have confidence that officers are held to the highest ethical standards — on duty or off duty. In fact, Minnesota’s model code of ethics says that officers shall not discredit themselves or their agency either on-duty or off. Yet Minnesota seems to have developed a culture of second chances for those who wear a badge, said Neil Melton, a former Bloomington police officer who ran Minnesota’s licensing board for 16 years.

 

“Benefit of the doubt. Benefit of the doubt. Benefit of the doubt,” Melton said. “At what point do we say enough is enough?”

 

 

 



@Centristsin2010 wrote:

Shielded By The Badge

 

Convicted, but still policing

 

Over the past two decades, hundreds of Minnesota law enforcement officers have been convicted of criminal offenses. Most were never disciplined by the state.

 

Jared Taylor choked a man until he blacked out.

 

Steven Brown fired a .38 Special during a confrontation with his fiancée.

 

Tom Bernardson punched a man so viciously that he put him in the hospital with a concussion.

 

All three were convicted in Minnesota courts.

 

And all three still work in law enforcement.

 

They are among hundreds of sworn officers in Minnesota who were convicted of criminal offenses in the past two decades yet kept their state law enforcement licenses, according to public records examined by the Star Tribune. Dozens of them are still on the job with a badge, a gun and the public’s trust that they will uphold the law.

 

The cases reveal a state licensing system that is failing repeatedly to hold officers accountable for reckless, sometimes violent, conduct.

 

In Minnesota, doctors and lawyers can lose their professional licenses for conduct that is unethical or unprofessional — even if they never break a law. Yet law enforcement officers can stay on the job for years even when a judge or jury finds them guilty of criminal behavior.

 

 

“The public needs to trust that those officers are going to be held accountable.”

 

Records also show that scores of the convictions stemmed from off-duty misconduct — including brawls, stalking and domestic altercations — that raise questions about an officer’s temperament for a job that authorizes the use of force.

 

Law enforcement leaders say it’s important for citizens to have confidence that officers are held to the highest ethical standards — on duty or off duty. In fact, Minnesota’s model code of ethics says that officers shall not discredit themselves or their agency either on-duty or off. Yet Minnesota seems to have developed a culture of second chances for those who wear a badge, said Neil Melton, a former Bloomington police officer who ran Minnesota’s licensing board for 16 years.

 

“Benefit of the doubt. Benefit of the doubt. Benefit of the doubt,” Melton said. “At what point do we say enough is enough?”

 

 

 Of course they are still policing. As I have said before law enforcement is the military wing of the Master Class. And as such the police get most of the legal benefits that the master class does IE no time served for convictions no loss of job no matter what they did even murder. Most of the people they murder are just low-class people anyway, black and white.

So it begins.
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Re: Convicted of Crimes, But Still Policing

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Those cops are lightweights. How about the ones who kill unarmed black people?

 

The shooting of Amadou Diallo occurred on February 4, 1999, when Amadou Diallo, a 23-year-old immigrant from Guinea, was shot and killed by four New York City Police Department plain-clothed officers—Sean Carroll, Richard Murphy, Edward McMellon and Kenneth Boss—after they mistook him for a rape suspect from one year earlier. The officers fired a combined total of 41 shots, 19 of which struck Diallo, outside his apartment at 1157 Wheeler Avenue in the Soundview section of The Bronx. The four were part of the now-defunct Street Crimes Unit. All four officers were charged with second-degree murder and acquitted at trial in Albany, New York.[1]

Diallo was unarmed, and a firestorm of controversy erupted subsequent to the event as the circumstances of the shooting prompted outrage both within and outside New York City. Issues such as police brutality, racial profiling, and contagious shooting were central to the ensuing controversy.

 

 

Winter is Coming.
11/06
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Convicted of Crimes, But Still Policing

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Shielded By The Badge

 

Convicted, but still policing

 

Over the past two decades, hundreds of Minnesota law enforcement officers have been convicted of criminal offenses. Most were never disciplined by the state.

 

Jared Taylor choked a man until he blacked out.

 

Steven Brown fired a .38 Special during a confrontation with his fiancée.

 

Tom Bernardson punched a man so viciously that he put him in the hospital with a concussion.

 

All three were convicted in Minnesota courts.

 

And all three still work in law enforcement.

 

They are among hundreds of sworn officers in Minnesota who were convicted of criminal offenses in the past two decades yet kept their state law enforcement licenses, according to public records examined by the Star Tribune. Dozens of them are still on the job with a badge, a gun and the public’s trust that they will uphold the law.

 

The cases reveal a state licensing system that is failing repeatedly to hold officers accountable for reckless, sometimes violent, conduct.

 

In Minnesota, doctors and lawyers can lose their professional licenses for conduct that is unethical or unprofessional — even if they never break a law. Yet law enforcement officers can stay on the job for years even when a judge or jury finds them guilty of criminal behavior.

 

 

“The public needs to trust that those officers are going to be held accountable.”

 

Records also show that scores of the convictions stemmed from off-duty misconduct — including brawls, stalking and domestic altercations — that raise questions about an officer’s temperament for a job that authorizes the use of force.

 

Law enforcement leaders say it’s important for citizens to have confidence that officers are held to the highest ethical standards — on duty or off duty. In fact, Minnesota’s model code of ethics says that officers shall not discredit themselves or their agency either on-duty or off. Yet Minnesota seems to have developed a culture of second chances for those who wear a badge, said Neil Melton, a former Bloomington police officer who ran Minnesota’s licensing board for 16 years.

 

“Benefit of the doubt. Benefit of the doubt. Benefit of the doubt,” Melton said. “At what point do we say enough is enough?”

 

 

 


"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in Washington DC, January 21, 2017.
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