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Re: Congressional Bi-partisanship A National Emergency

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Message 1 of 6

@mickstuder wrote:

@rk9152 wrote:

@mickstuder wrote:

@rk9152 wrote:

@mickstuder wrote:

Bipartisanship: How Congress Comes Together To Rip-off The Poor, Again

 

For most people, filing taxes is supposed to be free and easy.

 

Instead, the vast majority of Americans pay a fee to a private tax preparer each year.

 

We owe this annual ripoff to one of the most celebrated and misunderstood practices in American politics: bipartisanship.

 

Despite all the talk about widening political divides, Congress has approved thousands and thousands of pages of bipartisan legislation over the past decade ― everything from patent reform to Pentagon budgets to bank deregulation.

 

We don’t remember these bipartisan bills as significant achievements for a simple reason. Most of them are terrible legislation, throwing money at corporate interests, often to subvert a genuine public interest.

 

Last month, in a fit of bipartisan comity, the House of Representatives passed a bill that would solidify corporate America’s control over online tax filing ― an arrangement already rated by an independent watchdog as one of the IRS’s “most serious problems.

 

But the handout didn’t just materialize out of nowhere. Lawmakers were trying to undo a different bipartisan giveaway from the Obama years ― a government-backed bonanza for debt collection agencies that targeted the poor.

 

With their recent legislative push, Democrats and Republicans were setting aside their differences, to once again Destroy the poor in order to stop Destroying the poor.

 

While you can’t tell from the official record ― nobody voted against the IRS bill ― the unexpected furor surrounding the legislation has left several Democrats on Capitol Hill privately fuming, setting off an intraparty spat that tells us a lot about how the new House Democratic majority plans to govern ― or misgovern ― with their Republican colleagues.

 

The drama began all the way back in 2015, when everyone from President Barack Obama to the U.S. Chamber of Commerce wanted Congress to approve more infrastructure funding for roads and bridges.

 

Highway construction doesn’t have much to do with the private debt collection industry. Debt collectors contract with creditors to bring in bills that aren’t getting paid, deploying a variety of tricks and high-pressure tactics to get people to pay up.

 

As the highway bill moved through Congress, lawmakers searched for a set of “pay-fors” ― items that could be used to offset the $300 billion or so that would be spent on infrastructure. Republicans were averse to raising taxes; Democrats were reluctant to cut spending. Together, they settled on a third option: gimmicks.

 

For much of 2015, debt collectors had been trying to talk Congress into passing a law letting them go after delinquent federal tax bills. They could already badger people about medical bills and credit card debt ― why not taxes?

 

After a few months of wrangling, debt collectors hit the jackpot. Their bill would make it into the highway law, with Congress officially estimating that private contracting would ultimately save the government $2 billion over 10 years by collecting older tax debts the IRS had stopped working on.

 

Everybody knew this was a bad idea. Congress first tried letting private companies collect unpaid taxes under a pilot program approved in 1995. The debt collectors on contract managed to recoup about $3 million for the government ― but at a cost of $21 million. The initiative was scrapped, but in 2004, Congress told the IRS to try private contracting again, and once again, the agency found debt collectors were less effective than the IRS itself, and the pilot project was dropped.

 

Debt collectors are almost universally recognized as some of the lowest of lowlifes in American finance. They trick families into paying off the debts of dead relatives and threaten people with all kinds of nasty consequences if they don’t pay their own debts. But when people don’t pay their tax bills, it’s usually not because they haven’t been yelled at enough ― often they just don’t have much money. An accident, a job loss or other personal financial disaster has left them in tough shape, and they put off paying the few thousand dollars they owe to Uncle Sam while they meet other expenses. 

 

There are exceptions, of course. Rich people use fancy accounting tricks and borderline-illegal strategies to avoid paying taxes all the time. But under the highway bill plan, the IRS wouldn’t be asking debt collectors to focus on these complex cases, which can require years of litigation just to establish that taxes have not, in fact, been paid. Instead, debt collectors would go after people with uncontested tax bills ― mostly folks with modest incomes and modest tax bills.

 

But debt collectors have some powerful friends in Congress ― particularly Senate Finance Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.).

 

These friendships are based on two arrangements. First, debt collectors employ a lot of people in Iowa and New York. Second, debt collectors give a lot of money to Grassley and Schumer.

 

The Free Service That Somehow, Nobody Uses

For 17 years, the IRS has partnered with companies like H&R Block and Intuit (the maker of TurboTax) to run its “Free File” program, which is supposed to enable 70 percent of Americans to file their taxes online, free of charge. Instead, less than 3 percent of eligible taxpayers use the service because companies like Intuit and H&RBlock have buried the program on their websites and deliberately hidden it from Google search results ― directing taxpayers to their own proprietary tax filing services, like TurboTax, which are not free. All told, the tax prep industry takes in about $12 billion every year.

 

More Here - https://www.huffpost.com/entry/bipartisanship-congress-screws-the-poor_n_5cdd69e1e4b09648227c18d3

 

 


That was quite a shotgun blast at assorted pet peeves of yours. But let me focus on one aspect that particularly seemed to bother you - debt collectors.

 

True, they are not sweethearts. But considering who they are working with, what can you expect.

 

To anyone feeling mistreated by a debt collector, I would say, remember he is after you because of your mistreatment of your debtor.


True except if you are a member of the 80% of Americans at the bottom of the Income & Asset Pool - once again you are faced with a Two-tier System

 

the top 20% get to create hundreds of LLC's whose only purpose is to hide money - move it around in Circles making it impossible to Audit and reducing the need to pay Income Taxes or Debtors

 

Trump filed 6 Bankruptcies so his Debtors got almost nothing those 6 times and most of the rest of the people he owes money too - he simply ties them up in Court bleeding them dry & cheating them out of their ability to get their money owed to them by him

 

Then he goes on to lose of 100 Million $$ a year for 10 Straight years - someone ate those losses too - at the very least the American Tax Payers

 

The rest of us Can't Get the money to pay our debts from Russia or Saudi Arabia or from a Rich Daddy like Fred Trump who BTW made his money selling $12 Hammers for $300 to every one of his 500 LLC's

 

So yeah - mistreatment of the Debtor - but in my Scenario the Debtors are the Citizens of the USA who aren't getting what they paid for from Incumbents in Congress and especially Trump

 

The previous shot gun blast didn't have enough pellets? Now we have the top 20% and the President and his father.

 

I don't know what you are talking about with the Debtors not getting what they paid for. As I said, the only reason the debt collectors go after anyone is that they didn't pay their debt in the normal way.  Agreed???

 

.

 

 

 

 

 


 


What Debt Collectors Went After Trump

 

What Debt Collectors Went After Bernie Madoff

 

Debt Collectors is a Class Warfare Issue - Directed at those 80% of Americans who can't afford to fight them in Court

 

The Trumps & Madoffs of the World have Lawyers & Accountants to throw up Flak

 

Trump Filed 6 Bankruptcies and Lost 100 Million a year for 10 years Straight

 

What is his Credit Score - How Does He Keep Borrowing Money?

 

If any one of the Americans in the bottom 80% had 6 Bankruptcies and lost 100 Million a year for 10 years - they would never again be able to get Credit - Buy a Car - Own a Home - Get a Credit Card

 

Rich Folks do this kind of Stuff and Call it SPORT

 

It never has any Negative Impact - No Consequences

 

Thats a Two-tier System & it's Totally Unfair but Again Incumbents in Congress are Complicit

 

They allow this Stuff to Happen and Do Nothing

 

Trump right now is Thumbing his Nose at Congressional Subpoenas

 

What American in the bottom 80% would be allowed to Simply Ignore Subpoenas without getting arrested

 

Trump says this is all part of being a Good & Talented American - Exploiting a Already Rigged System

 

Your complaint was:

 

With their recent legislative push, Democrats andRepublicans were setting aside their differences, to once again Destroy the poor in order to stop Destroying the poor.

           AND

Debt collectors are almost universally recognized as some of the lowest of lowlifes in American finance. They trick families into paying off the debts of dead relatives and threaten people with all kinds of nasty consequences if they don’t pay their own debts. But when people don’t pay their tax bills, it’s usually not because they haven’t been yelled at enough ― often they just don’t have much money. 

 

How are the Trump's related to that??

 

 


 

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Re: Congressional Bi-partisanship A National Emergency

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Message 2 of 6

@rk9152 wrote:

@mickstuder wrote:

@rk9152 wrote:

@mickstuder wrote:

Bipartisanship: How Congress Comes Together To Rip-off The Poor, Again

 

For most people, filing taxes is supposed to be free and easy.

 

Instead, the vast majority of Americans pay a fee to a private tax preparer each year.

 

We owe this annual ripoff to one of the most celebrated and misunderstood practices in American politics: bipartisanship.

 

Despite all the talk about widening political divides, Congress has approved thousands and thousands of pages of bipartisan legislation over the past decade ― everything from patent reform to Pentagon budgets to bank deregulation.

 

We don’t remember these bipartisan bills as significant achievements for a simple reason. Most of them are terrible legislation, throwing money at corporate interests, often to subvert a genuine public interest.

 

Last month, in a fit of bipartisan comity, the House of Representatives passed a bill that would solidify corporate America’s control over online tax filing ― an arrangement already rated by an independent watchdog as one of the IRS’s “most serious problems.

 

But the handout didn’t just materialize out of nowhere. Lawmakers were trying to undo a different bipartisan giveaway from the Obama years ― a government-backed bonanza for debt collection agencies that targeted the poor.

 

With their recent legislative push, Democrats and Republicans were setting aside their differences, to once again Destroy the poor in order to stop Destroying the poor.

 

While you can’t tell from the official record ― nobody voted against the IRS bill ― the unexpected furor surrounding the legislation has left several Democrats on Capitol Hill privately fuming, setting off an intraparty spat that tells us a lot about how the new House Democratic majority plans to govern ― or misgovern ― with their Republican colleagues.

 

The drama began all the way back in 2015, when everyone from President Barack Obama to the U.S. Chamber of Commerce wanted Congress to approve more infrastructure funding for roads and bridges.

 

Highway construction doesn’t have much to do with the private debt collection industry. Debt collectors contract with creditors to bring in bills that aren’t getting paid, deploying a variety of tricks and high-pressure tactics to get people to pay up.

 

As the highway bill moved through Congress, lawmakers searched for a set of “pay-fors” ― items that could be used to offset the $300 billion or so that would be spent on infrastructure. Republicans were averse to raising taxes; Democrats were reluctant to cut spending. Together, they settled on a third option: gimmicks.

 

For much of 2015, debt collectors had been trying to talk Congress into passing a law letting them go after delinquent federal tax bills. They could already badger people about medical bills and credit card debt ― why not taxes?

 

After a few months of wrangling, debt collectors hit the jackpot. Their bill would make it into the highway law, with Congress officially estimating that private contracting would ultimately save the government $2 billion over 10 years by collecting older tax debts the IRS had stopped working on.

 

Everybody knew this was a bad idea. Congress first tried letting private companies collect unpaid taxes under a pilot program approved in 1995. The debt collectors on contract managed to recoup about $3 million for the government ― but at a cost of $21 million. The initiative was scrapped, but in 2004, Congress told the IRS to try private contracting again, and once again, the agency found debt collectors were less effective than the IRS itself, and the pilot project was dropped.

 

Debt collectors are almost universally recognized as some of the lowest of lowlifes in American finance. They trick families into paying off the debts of dead relatives and threaten people with all kinds of nasty consequences if they don’t pay their own debts. But when people don’t pay their tax bills, it’s usually not because they haven’t been yelled at enough ― often they just don’t have much money. An accident, a job loss or other personal financial disaster has left them in tough shape, and they put off paying the few thousand dollars they owe to Uncle Sam while they meet other expenses. 

 

There are exceptions, of course. Rich people use fancy accounting tricks and borderline-illegal strategies to avoid paying taxes all the time. But under the highway bill plan, the IRS wouldn’t be asking debt collectors to focus on these complex cases, which can require years of litigation just to establish that taxes have not, in fact, been paid. Instead, debt collectors would go after people with uncontested tax bills ― mostly folks with modest incomes and modest tax bills.

 

But debt collectors have some powerful friends in Congress ― particularly Senate Finance Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.).

 

These friendships are based on two arrangements. First, debt collectors employ a lot of people in Iowa and New York. Second, debt collectors give a lot of money to Grassley and Schumer.

 

The Free Service That Somehow, Nobody Uses

For 17 years, the IRS has partnered with companies like H&R Block and Intuit (the maker of TurboTax) to run its “Free File” program, which is supposed to enable 70 percent of Americans to file their taxes online, free of charge. Instead, less than 3 percent of eligible taxpayers use the service because companies like Intuit and H&RBlock have buried the program on their websites and deliberately hidden it from Google search results ― directing taxpayers to their own proprietary tax filing services, like TurboTax, which are not free. All told, the tax prep industry takes in about $12 billion every year.

 

More Here - https://www.huffpost.com/entry/bipartisanship-congress-screws-the-poor_n_5cdd69e1e4b09648227c18d3

 

 


That was quite a shotgun blast at assorted pet peeves of yours. But let me focus on one aspect that particularly seemed to bother you - debt collectors.

 

True, they are not sweethearts. But considering who they are working with, what can you expect.

 

To anyone feeling mistreated by a debt collector, I would say, remember he is after you because of your mistreatment of your debtor.


True except if you are a member of the 80% of Americans at the bottom of the Income & Asset Pool - once again you are faced with a Two-tier System

 

the top 20% get to create hundreds of LLC's whose only purpose is to hide money - move it around in Circles making it impossible to Audit and reducing the need to pay Income Taxes or Debtors

 

Trump filed 6 Bankruptcies so his Debtors got almost nothing those 6 times and most of the rest of the people he owes money too - he simply ties them up in Court bleeding them dry & cheating them out of their ability to get their money owed to them by him

 

Then he goes on to lose of 100 Million $$ a year for 10 Straight years - someone ate those losses too - at the very least the American Tax Payers

 

The rest of us Can't Get the money to pay our debts from Russia or Saudi Arabia or from a Rich Daddy like Fred Trump who BTW made his money selling $12 Hammers for $300 to every one of his 500 LLC's

 

So yeah - mistreatment of the Debtor - but in my Scenario the Debtors are the Citizens of the USA who aren't getting what they paid for from Incumbents in Congress and especially Trump

 

The previous shot gun blast didn't have enough pellets? Now we have the top 20% and the President and his father.

 

I don't know what you are talking about with the Debtors not getting what they paid for. As I said, the only reason the debt collectors go after anyone is that they didn't pay their debt in the normal way.  Agreed???

 

.

 

 

 

 

 


 


What Debt Collectors Went After Trump

 

What Debt Collectors Went After Bernie Madoff

 

Debt Collectors is a Class Warfare Issue - Directed at those 80% of Americans who can't afford to fight them in Court

 

The Trumps & Madoffs of the World have Lawyers & Accountants to throw up Flak

 

Trump Filed 6 Bankruptcies and Lost 100 Million a year for 10 years Straight

 

What is his Credit Score - How Does He Keep Borrowing Money?

 

If any one of the Americans in the bottom 80% had 6 Bankruptcies and lost 100 Million a year for 10 years - they would never again be able to get Credit - Buy a Car - Own a Home - Get a Credit Card

 

Rich Folks do this kind of Stuff and Call it SPORT

 

It never has any Negative Impact - No Consequences

 

Thats a Two-tier System & it's Totally Unfair but Again Incumbents in Congress are Complicit

 

They allow this Stuff to Happen and Do Nothing

 

Trump right now is Thumbing his Nose at Congressional Subpoenas

 

What American in the bottom 80% would be allowed to Simply Ignore Subpoenas without getting arrested

 

Trump says this is all part of being a Good & Talented American - Exploiting a Already Rigged System

 

 

 

 

( " China if You're Listening - Get Trumps Tax Returns " )

" )
" - Anonymous

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Re: Congressional Bi-partisanship A National Emergency

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Message 3 of 6

@mickstuder wrote:

@rk9152 wrote:

@mickstuder wrote:

Bipartisanship: How Congress Comes Together To Rip-off The Poor, Again

 

For most people, filing taxes is supposed to be free and easy.

 

Instead, the vast majority of Americans pay a fee to a private tax preparer each year.

 

We owe this annual ripoff to one of the most celebrated and misunderstood practices in American politics: bipartisanship.

 

Despite all the talk about widening political divides, Congress has approved thousands and thousands of pages of bipartisan legislation over the past decade ― everything from patent reform to Pentagon budgets to bank deregulation.

 

We don’t remember these bipartisan bills as significant achievements for a simple reason. Most of them are terrible legislation, throwing money at corporate interests, often to subvert a genuine public interest.

 

Last month, in a fit of bipartisan comity, the House of Representatives passed a bill that would solidify corporate America’s control over online tax filing ― an arrangement already rated by an independent watchdog as one of the IRS’s “most serious problems.

 

But the handout didn’t just materialize out of nowhere. Lawmakers were trying to undo a different bipartisan giveaway from the Obama years ― a government-backed bonanza for debt collection agencies that targeted the poor.

 

With their recent legislative push, Democrats and Republicans were setting aside their differences, to once again Destroy the poor in order to stop Destroying the poor.

 

While you can’t tell from the official record ― nobody voted against the IRS bill ― the unexpected furor surrounding the legislation has left several Democrats on Capitol Hill privately fuming, setting off an intraparty spat that tells us a lot about how the new House Democratic majority plans to govern ― or misgovern ― with their Republican colleagues.

 

The drama began all the way back in 2015, when everyone from President Barack Obama to the U.S. Chamber of Commerce wanted Congress to approve more infrastructure funding for roads and bridges.

 

Highway construction doesn’t have much to do with the private debt collection industry. Debt collectors contract with creditors to bring in bills that aren’t getting paid, deploying a variety of tricks and high-pressure tactics to get people to pay up.

 

As the highway bill moved through Congress, lawmakers searched for a set of “pay-fors” ― items that could be used to offset the $300 billion or so that would be spent on infrastructure. Republicans were averse to raising taxes; Democrats were reluctant to cut spending. Together, they settled on a third option: gimmicks.

 

For much of 2015, debt collectors had been trying to talk Congress into passing a law letting them go after delinquent federal tax bills. They could already badger people about medical bills and credit card debt ― why not taxes?

 

After a few months of wrangling, debt collectors hit the jackpot. Their bill would make it into the highway law, with Congress officially estimating that private contracting would ultimately save the government $2 billion over 10 years by collecting older tax debts the IRS had stopped working on.

 

Everybody knew this was a bad idea. Congress first tried letting private companies collect unpaid taxes under a pilot program approved in 1995. The debt collectors on contract managed to recoup about $3 million for the government ― but at a cost of $21 million. The initiative was scrapped, but in 2004, Congress told the IRS to try private contracting again, and once again, the agency found debt collectors were less effective than the IRS itself, and the pilot project was dropped.

 

Debt collectors are almost universally recognized as some of the lowest of lowlifes in American finance. They trick families into paying off the debts of dead relatives and threaten people with all kinds of nasty consequences if they don’t pay their own debts. But when people don’t pay their tax bills, it’s usually not because they haven’t been yelled at enough ― often they just don’t have much money. An accident, a job loss or other personal financial disaster has left them in tough shape, and they put off paying the few thousand dollars they owe to Uncle Sam while they meet other expenses. 

 

There are exceptions, of course. Rich people use fancy accounting tricks and borderline-illegal strategies to avoid paying taxes all the time. But under the highway bill plan, the IRS wouldn’t be asking debt collectors to focus on these complex cases, which can require years of litigation just to establish that taxes have not, in fact, been paid. Instead, debt collectors would go after people with uncontested tax bills ― mostly folks with modest incomes and modest tax bills.

 

But debt collectors have some powerful friends in Congress ― particularly Senate Finance Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.).

 

These friendships are based on two arrangements. First, debt collectors employ a lot of people in Iowa and New York. Second, debt collectors give a lot of money to Grassley and Schumer.

 

The Free Service That Somehow, Nobody Uses

For 17 years, the IRS has partnered with companies like H&R Block and Intuit (the maker of TurboTax) to run its “Free File” program, which is supposed to enable 70 percent of Americans to file their taxes online, free of charge. Instead, less than 3 percent of eligible taxpayers use the service because companies like Intuit and H&RBlock have buried the program on their websites and deliberately hidden it from Google search results ― directing taxpayers to their own proprietary tax filing services, like TurboTax, which are not free. All told, the tax prep industry takes in about $12 billion every year.

 

More Here - https://www.huffpost.com/entry/bipartisanship-congress-screws-the-poor_n_5cdd69e1e4b09648227c18d3

 

 


That was quite a shotgun blast at assorted pet peeves of yours. But let me focus on one aspect that particularly seemed to bother you - debt collectors.

 

True, they are not sweethearts. But considering who they are working with, what can you expect.

 

To anyone feeling mistreated by a debt collector, I would say, remember he is after you because of your mistreatment of your debtor.


True except if you are a member of the 80% of Americans at the bottom of the Income & Asset Pool - once again you are faced with a Two-tier System

 

the top 20% get to create hundreds of LLC's whose only purpose is to hide money - move it around in Circles making it impossible to Audit and reducing the need to pay Income Taxes or Debtors

 

Trump filed 6 Bankruptcies so his Debtors got almost nothing those 6 times and most of the rest of the people he owes money too - he simply ties them up in Court bleeding them dry & cheating them out of their ability to get their money owed to them by him

 

Then he goes on to lose of 100 Million $$ a year for 10 Straight years - someone ate those losses too - at the very least the American Tax Payers

 

The rest of us Can't Get the money to pay our debts from Russia or Saudi Arabia or from a Rich Daddy like Fred Trump who BTW made his money selling $12 Hammers for $300 to every one of his 500 LLC's

 

So yeah - mistreatment of the Debtor - but in my Scenario the Debtors are the Citizens of the USA who aren't getting what they paid for from Incumbents in Congress and especially Trump

 

The previous shot gun blast didn't have enough pellets? Now we have the top 20% and the President and his father.

 

I don't know what you are talking about with the Debtors not getting what they paid for. As I said, the only reason the debt collectors go after anyone is that they didn't pay their debt in the normal way.  Agreed???

 

.

 

 

 

 

 


 

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Re: Congressional Bi-partisanship A National Emergency

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Message 4 of 6

@rk9152 wrote:

@mickstuder wrote:

Bipartisanship: How Congress Comes Together To Rip-off The Poor, Again

 

For most people, filing taxes is supposed to be free and easy.

 

Instead, the vast majority of Americans pay a fee to a private tax preparer each year.

 

We owe this annual ripoff to one of the most celebrated and misunderstood practices in American politics: bipartisanship.

 

Despite all the talk about widening political divides, Congress has approved thousands and thousands of pages of bipartisan legislation over the past decade ― everything from patent reform to Pentagon budgets to bank deregulation.

 

We don’t remember these bipartisan bills as significant achievements for a simple reason. Most of them are terrible legislation, throwing money at corporate interests, often to subvert a genuine public interest.

 

Last month, in a fit of bipartisan comity, the House of Representatives passed a bill that would solidify corporate America’s control over online tax filing ― an arrangement already rated by an independent watchdog as one of the IRS’s “most serious problems.

 

But the handout didn’t just materialize out of nowhere. Lawmakers were trying to undo a different bipartisan giveaway from the Obama years ― a government-backed bonanza for debt collection agencies that targeted the poor.

 

With their recent legislative push, Democrats and Republicans were setting aside their differences, to once again Destroy the poor in order to stop Destroying the poor.

 

While you can’t tell from the official record ― nobody voted against the IRS bill ― the unexpected furor surrounding the legislation has left several Democrats on Capitol Hill privately fuming, setting off an intraparty spat that tells us a lot about how the new House Democratic majority plans to govern ― or misgovern ― with their Republican colleagues.

 

The drama began all the way back in 2015, when everyone from President Barack Obama to the U.S. Chamber of Commerce wanted Congress to approve more infrastructure funding for roads and bridges.

 

Highway construction doesn’t have much to do with the private debt collection industry. Debt collectors contract with creditors to bring in bills that aren’t getting paid, deploying a variety of tricks and high-pressure tactics to get people to pay up.

 

As the highway bill moved through Congress, lawmakers searched for a set of “pay-fors” ― items that could be used to offset the $300 billion or so that would be spent on infrastructure. Republicans were averse to raising taxes; Democrats were reluctant to cut spending. Together, they settled on a third option: gimmicks.

 

For much of 2015, debt collectors had been trying to talk Congress into passing a law letting them go after delinquent federal tax bills. They could already badger people about medical bills and credit card debt ― why not taxes?

 

After a few months of wrangling, debt collectors hit the jackpot. Their bill would make it into the highway law, with Congress officially estimating that private contracting would ultimately save the government $2 billion over 10 years by collecting older tax debts the IRS had stopped working on.

 

Everybody knew this was a bad idea. Congress first tried letting private companies collect unpaid taxes under a pilot program approved in 1995. The debt collectors on contract managed to recoup about $3 million for the government ― but at a cost of $21 million. The initiative was scrapped, but in 2004, Congress told the IRS to try private contracting again, and once again, the agency found debt collectors were less effective than the IRS itself, and the pilot project was dropped.

 

Debt collectors are almost universally recognized as some of the lowest of lowlifes in American finance. They trick families into paying off the debts of dead relatives and threaten people with all kinds of nasty consequences if they don’t pay their own debts. But when people don’t pay their tax bills, it’s usually not because they haven’t been yelled at enough ― often they just don’t have much money. An accident, a job loss or other personal financial disaster has left them in tough shape, and they put off paying the few thousand dollars they owe to Uncle Sam while they meet other expenses. 

 

There are exceptions, of course. Rich people use fancy accounting tricks and borderline-illegal strategies to avoid paying taxes all the time. But under the highway bill plan, the IRS wouldn’t be asking debt collectors to focus on these complex cases, which can require years of litigation just to establish that taxes have not, in fact, been paid. Instead, debt collectors would go after people with uncontested tax bills ― mostly folks with modest incomes and modest tax bills.

 

But debt collectors have some powerful friends in Congress ― particularly Senate Finance Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.).

 

These friendships are based on two arrangements. First, debt collectors employ a lot of people in Iowa and New York. Second, debt collectors give a lot of money to Grassley and Schumer.

 

The Free Service That Somehow, Nobody Uses

For 17 years, the IRS has partnered with companies like H&R Block and Intuit (the maker of TurboTax) to run its “Free File” program, which is supposed to enable 70 percent of Americans to file their taxes online, free of charge. Instead, less than 3 percent of eligible taxpayers use the service because companies like Intuit and H&RBlock have buried the program on their websites and deliberately hidden it from Google search results ― directing taxpayers to their own proprietary tax filing services, like TurboTax, which are not free. All told, the tax prep industry takes in about $12 billion every year.

 

More Here - https://www.huffpost.com/entry/bipartisanship-congress-screws-the-poor_n_5cdd69e1e4b09648227c18d3

 

 


That was quite a shotgun blast at assorted pet peeves of yours. But let me focus on one aspect that particularly seemed to bother you - debt collectors.

 

True, they are not sweethearts. But considering who they are working with, what can you expect.

 

To anyone feeling mistreated by a debt collector, I would say, remember he is after you because of your mistreatment of your debtor.


True except if you are a member of the 80% of Americans at the bottom of the Income & Asset Pool - once again you are faced with a Two-tier System

 

the top 20% get to create hundreds of LLC's whose only purpose is to hide money - move it around in Circles making it impossible to Audit and reducing the need to pay Income Taxes or Debtors

 

Trump filed 6 Bankruptcies so his Debtors got almost nothing those 6 times and most of the rest of the people he owes money too - he simply ties them up in Court bleeding them dry & cheating them out of their ability to get their money owed to them by him

 

Then he goes on to lose of 100 Million $$ a year for 10 Straight years - someone ate those losses too - at the very least the American Tax Payers

 

The rest of us Can't Get the money to pay our debts from Russia or Saudi Arabia or from a Rich Daddy like Fred Trump who BTW made his money selling $12 Hammers for $300 to every one of his 500 LLC's

 

So yeah - mistreatment of the Debtor - but in my Scenario the Debtors are the Citizens of the USA who aren't getting what they paid for from Incumbents in Congress and especially Trump

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

( " China if You're Listening - Get Trumps Tax Returns " )

" )
" - Anonymous

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Re: Congressional Bi-partisanship A National Emergency

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Message 5 of 6

@mickstuder wrote:

Bipartisanship: How Congress Comes Together To Rip-off The Poor, Again

 

For most people, filing taxes is supposed to be free and easy.

 

Instead, the vast majority of Americans pay a fee to a private tax preparer each year.

 

We owe this annual ripoff to one of the most celebrated and misunderstood practices in American politics: bipartisanship.

 

Despite all the talk about widening political divides, Congress has approved thousands and thousands of pages of bipartisan legislation over the past decade ― everything from patent reform to Pentagon budgets to bank deregulation.

 

We don’t remember these bipartisan bills as significant achievements for a simple reason. Most of them are terrible legislation, throwing money at corporate interests, often to subvert a genuine public interest.

 

Last month, in a fit of bipartisan comity, the House of Representatives passed a bill that would solidify corporate America’s control over online tax filing ― an arrangement already rated by an independent watchdog as one of the IRS’s “most serious problems.

 

But the handout didn’t just materialize out of nowhere. Lawmakers were trying to undo a different bipartisan giveaway from the Obama years ― a government-backed bonanza for debt collection agencies that targeted the poor.

 

With their recent legislative push, Democrats and Republicans were setting aside their differences, to once again Destroy the poor in order to stop Destroying the poor.

 

While you can’t tell from the official record ― nobody voted against the IRS bill ― the unexpected furor surrounding the legislation has left several Democrats on Capitol Hill privately fuming, setting off an intraparty spat that tells us a lot about how the new House Democratic majority plans to govern ― or misgovern ― with their Republican colleagues.

 

The drama began all the way back in 2015, when everyone from President Barack Obama to the U.S. Chamber of Commerce wanted Congress to approve more infrastructure funding for roads and bridges.

 

Highway construction doesn’t have much to do with the private debt collection industry. Debt collectors contract with creditors to bring in bills that aren’t getting paid, deploying a variety of tricks and high-pressure tactics to get people to pay up.

 

As the highway bill moved through Congress, lawmakers searched for a set of “pay-fors” ― items that could be used to offset the $300 billion or so that would be spent on infrastructure. Republicans were averse to raising taxes; Democrats were reluctant to cut spending. Together, they settled on a third option: gimmicks.

 

For much of 2015, debt collectors had been trying to talk Congress into passing a law letting them go after delinquent federal tax bills. They could already badger people about medical bills and credit card debt ― why not taxes?

 

After a few months of wrangling, debt collectors hit the jackpot. Their bill would make it into the highway law, with Congress officially estimating that private contracting would ultimately save the government $2 billion over 10 years by collecting older tax debts the IRS had stopped working on.

 

Everybody knew this was a bad idea. Congress first tried letting private companies collect unpaid taxes under a pilot program approved in 1995. The debt collectors on contract managed to recoup about $3 million for the government ― but at a cost of $21 million. The initiative was scrapped, but in 2004, Congress told the IRS to try private contracting again, and once again, the agency found debt collectors were less effective than the IRS itself, and the pilot project was dropped.

 

Debt collectors are almost universally recognized as some of the lowest of lowlifes in American finance. They trick families into paying off the debts of dead relatives and threaten people with all kinds of nasty consequences if they don’t pay their own debts. But when people don’t pay their tax bills, it’s usually not because they haven’t been yelled at enough ― often they just don’t have much money. An accident, a job loss or other personal financial disaster has left them in tough shape, and they put off paying the few thousand dollars they owe to Uncle Sam while they meet other expenses. 

 

There are exceptions, of course. Rich people use fancy accounting tricks and borderline-illegal strategies to avoid paying taxes all the time. But under the highway bill plan, the IRS wouldn’t be asking debt collectors to focus on these complex cases, which can require years of litigation just to establish that taxes have not, in fact, been paid. Instead, debt collectors would go after people with uncontested tax bills ― mostly folks with modest incomes and modest tax bills.

 

But debt collectors have some powerful friends in Congress ― particularly Senate Finance Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.).

 

These friendships are based on two arrangements. First, debt collectors employ a lot of people in Iowa and New York. Second, debt collectors give a lot of money to Grassley and Schumer.

 

The Free Service That Somehow, Nobody Uses

For 17 years, the IRS has partnered with companies like H&R Block and Intuit (the maker of TurboTax) to run its “Free File” program, which is supposed to enable 70 percent of Americans to file their taxes online, free of charge. Instead, less than 3 percent of eligible taxpayers use the service because companies like Intuit and H&RBlock have buried the program on their websites and deliberately hidden it from Google search results ― directing taxpayers to their own proprietary tax filing services, like TurboTax, which are not free. All told, the tax prep industry takes in about $12 billion every year.

 

More Here - https://www.huffpost.com/entry/bipartisanship-congress-screws-the-poor_n_5cdd69e1e4b09648227c18d3

 

 


That was quite a shotgun blast at assorted pet peeves of yours. But let me focus on one aspect that particularly seemed to bother you - debt collectors.

 

True, they are not sweethearts. But considering who they are working with, what can you expect.

 

To anyone feeling mistreated by a debt collector, I would say, remember he is after you because of your mistreatment of your debtor.

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Congressional Bi-partisanship A National Emergency

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Message 6 of 6

Bipartisanship: How Congress Comes Together To Rip-off The Poor, Again

 

For most people, filing taxes is supposed to be free and easy.

 

Instead, the vast majority of Americans pay a fee to a private tax preparer each year.

 

We owe this annual ripoff to one of the most celebrated and misunderstood practices in American politics: bipartisanship.

 

Despite all the talk about widening political divides, Congress has approved thousands and thousands of pages of bipartisan legislation over the past decade ― everything from patent reform to Pentagon budgets to bank deregulation.

 

We don’t remember these bipartisan bills as significant achievements for a simple reason. Most of them are terrible legislation, throwing money at corporate interests, often to subvert a genuine public interest.

 

Last month, in a fit of bipartisan comity, the House of Representatives passed a bill that would solidify corporate America’s control over online tax filing ― an arrangement already rated by an independent watchdog as one of the IRS’s “most serious problems.

 

But the handout didn’t just materialize out of nowhere. Lawmakers were trying to undo a different bipartisan giveaway from the Obama years ― a government-backed bonanza for debt collection agencies that targeted the poor.

 

With their recent legislative push, Democrats and Republicans were setting aside their differences, to once again Destroy the poor in order to stop Destroying the poor.

 

While you can’t tell from the official record ― nobody voted against the IRS bill ― the unexpected furor surrounding the legislation has left several Democrats on Capitol Hill privately fuming, setting off an intraparty spat that tells us a lot about how the new House Democratic majority plans to govern ― or misgovern ― with their Republican colleagues.

 

The drama began all the way back in 2015, when everyone from President Barack Obama to the U.S. Chamber of Commerce wanted Congress to approve more infrastructure funding for roads and bridges.

 

Highway construction doesn’t have much to do with the private debt collection industry. Debt collectors contract with creditors to bring in bills that aren’t getting paid, deploying a variety of tricks and high-pressure tactics to get people to pay up.

 

As the highway bill moved through Congress, lawmakers searched for a set of “pay-fors” ― items that could be used to offset the $300 billion or so that would be spent on infrastructure. Republicans were averse to raising taxes; Democrats were reluctant to cut spending. Together, they settled on a third option: gimmicks.

 

For much of 2015, debt collectors had been trying to talk Congress into passing a law letting them go after delinquent federal tax bills. They could already badger people about medical bills and credit card debt ― why not taxes?

 

After a few months of wrangling, debt collectors hit the jackpot. Their bill would make it into the highway law, with Congress officially estimating that private contracting would ultimately save the government $2 billion over 10 years by collecting older tax debts the IRS had stopped working on.

 

Everybody knew this was a bad idea. Congress first tried letting private companies collect unpaid taxes under a pilot program approved in 1995. The debt collectors on contract managed to recoup about $3 million for the government ― but at a cost of $21 million. The initiative was scrapped, but in 2004, Congress told the IRS to try private contracting again, and once again, the agency found debt collectors were less effective than the IRS itself, and the pilot project was dropped.

 

Debt collectors are almost universally recognized as some of the lowest of lowlifes in American finance. They trick families into paying off the debts of dead relatives and threaten people with all kinds of nasty consequences if they don’t pay their own debts. But when people don’t pay their tax bills, it’s usually not because they haven’t been yelled at enough ― often they just don’t have much money. An accident, a job loss or other personal financial disaster has left them in tough shape, and they put off paying the few thousand dollars they owe to Uncle Sam while they meet other expenses. 

 

There are exceptions, of course. Rich people use fancy accounting tricks and borderline-illegal strategies to avoid paying taxes all the time. But under the highway bill plan, the IRS wouldn’t be asking debt collectors to focus on these complex cases, which can require years of litigation just to establish that taxes have not, in fact, been paid. Instead, debt collectors would go after people with uncontested tax bills ― mostly folks with modest incomes and modest tax bills.

 

But debt collectors have some powerful friends in Congress ― particularly Senate Finance Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.).

 

These friendships are based on two arrangements. First, debt collectors employ a lot of people in Iowa and New York. Second, debt collectors give a lot of money to Grassley and Schumer.

 

The Free Service That Somehow, Nobody Uses

For 17 years, the IRS has partnered with companies like H&R Block and Intuit (the maker of TurboTax) to run its “Free File” program, which is supposed to enable 70 percent of Americans to file their taxes online, free of charge. Instead, less than 3 percent of eligible taxpayers use the service because companies like Intuit and H&RBlock have buried the program on their websites and deliberately hidden it from Google search results ― directing taxpayers to their own proprietary tax filing services, like TurboTax, which are not free. All told, the tax prep industry takes in about $12 billion every year.

 

More Here - https://www.huffpost.com/entry/bipartisanship-congress-screws-the-poor_n_5cdd69e1e4b09648227c18d3

 

 

( " China if You're Listening - Get Trumps Tax Returns " )

" )
" - Anonymous

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