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Re: Buttigieg, a gay Christian, is driving the religious right nuts

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Message 41 of 49

Does this make him qualified for President?  I had no idea that sexual preference was  any part of the selection.  Seems that would make it sexist.

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Re: Buttigieg, a gay Christian, is driving the religious right nuts

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Message 42 of 49


"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in Washington DC, January 21, 2017.
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Re: Buttigieg, a gay Christian, is driving the religious right nuts

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Message 43 of 49

@Centristsin2010 wrote:

Pete Buttigieg, a gay Christian, is driving the religious right nuts

 

I saw no "nut driving". I did see a difference in opinion regarding biblical interpretation from Graham.

 

Can you point to the "nut driving" you saw in this situation?

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Re: Buttigieg, a gay Christian, is driving the religious right nuts

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Message 44 of 49

Great!  Do you identify as the "religious right"?


"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in Washington DC, January 21, 2017.
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Re: Buttigieg, a gay Christian, is driving the religious right nuts

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Message 45 of 49

He doesn't bother me in the least.  His private life is just that or should be, private.  

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Re: Buttigieg, a gay Christian, is driving the religious right nuts

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Message 46 of 49

There is no doubt that the ones that would  attack him the most are the Evangelists, He simply shows how poor and weak what they try to convey really is.

LIke I have stated, the Evangelist simply follow the example that i have given. "Forgive me while I am killing you" and the fact that their moral values seem to be not only fragile but flexible.

I think that he would be a great President, but his time is not now,, not yet. but we should all have his name inour minds because we will see him surge in the years to come.

 

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Re: Buttigieg, a gay Christian, is driving the religious right nuts

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Message 47 of 49

I love the fact that he is devoted to his husband while Trump is best known for his affair with a porn star. The mayor's lifestyle just points out all the hypocrisy of the Religious Right. 

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Re: Buttigieg, a gay Christian, is driving the religious right nuts

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Message 48 of 49

personally I love this guy, and the GOP suddenly is really focusing on attacking him of late as he continues to shine, and rise in polls. He is in my top 5 list.....refreshingly intelligent and capable of answering any question put to him. Marvelous!!!

welcome back Cen. you have been missed!!

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Buttigieg, a gay Christian, is driving the religious right nuts

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Message 49 of 49

Pete Buttigieg, a gay Christian, is driving the religious right nuts

 

The only Democrat talking at length about his faith in the 2020 primary also happens to be the only gay candidate in the race. And he's one of the few from a red state.

 

South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg is an Episcopalian who can freely quote Bible verses. He's also a presidential candidate who embraces his husband on stage at campaign rallies.
 
Combining homosexuality and Christianity might be the most natural thing in the world for Buttigieg and millions of gay Americans, but it is an iconoclastic development in American politics, where generalizations about religious freedom have in recent years been used specifically to fight advances in LGBTQ rights.
 
For some on the religious right, like Franklin Graham, Buttigieg's identity, while it's shared by many gay Americans of faith, does not compute.
 
Graham, in a series of critical tweets, said that being a gay Christian "is something to be repentant of, not to be flaunted, praised or politicized."
 
Pence says Buttigieg bringing 'attacks' on his faith 01:42
 
Comments from leaders like Graham, a supporter of Trump who is now saying Buttigieg's interpretation of faith is flawed, will complicate Pence's argument that his own faith is being targeted by Buttigieg.
 
What drew Graham's ire were comments at a CNN town hall this week, when Buttigieg was asked by a woman who described herself as a bisexual Christian, how he will "challenge the right's moral
monopoly on Christianity to unite conservative, moderate and liberal Christians alike..."
 
His full answer is worth reading, but the essence is that he acknowledged it "can be challenging to be a person of faith who's also part of the LGBTQ community" while also saying his understanding of faith is far different than Pence's or Graham's:
 
"Part of where I'm coming from is a faith tradition that counsels me to be as humble as possible, that counsels me to look after those who need defending.
 
And frankly, it couldn't be more radically different than what I see certainly in this White House, where there's a lot of chest-thumping and self-aggrandizing, not to mention abusive behavior, but also a political agenda that seems to always be revolving around the idea that somehow it's too easy for poor people in this country. It's just so different than what I get when I read scripture.
And I get that one of the things about scripture is different people see different things in it. But at the very least, we should be able to establish that God does not have a political party."
 
There is still a strong religious divide in the country on the subject of gay rights. In a 2017 Pew survey, there was strong support (62%) among all Americans for same-sex marriage like the one a Supreme Court decision allows Buttigieg to enjoy. Just 32% of Americans oppose it.
 
More than two-thirds of Americans not affiliated with a religion (85%) support it, along with Catholics (67%) and white mainline Protestants (68%). But support was less than 50% among other groups Pew broke out, including black Protestants (44% support) and white evangelical Protestants (35%).
 
That divide carried over to political groups. Just 40% of Republicans supported same-sex marriage in the survey, compared to 73% of Democrats and 60% of Independents.
 
There are other polls, such as this one from Pew, that document how Republicans are more likely to believe in God than Democrats, that they're more likely to go to church, and that religion plays a larger role in the lives of more Republicans than Democrats.
 
Which is not to say that Democrats don't rely on religious voters. But they tend to focus on black churches. Trump, however, is equally or more reliant on white evangelicals to help him win re-election. Pence is not the only evangelical Christian working for the President; his press secretary Sarah Sanders said God wants Trump to be in office.
 
It's not at all clear that Buttigieg would be able to win over more churchgoers than other candidates. Hillary Clinton, a churchgoing Methodist, spoke less often than him about her own faith, but she did talk about it. She lost in 2016, however, among people who go to church monthly or more (Clinton got 43% to Trump's 53%), according to exit polls. She won 54% - 39% among people who go less than that.
 
The country is changing, however.
 
In 2016, fewer than half of voters (49%) said they went to church monthly or more. In 2012, 55% of voters in exit polls said they went to church monthly or more. In 2008, it was 54%. In 2004, it was 56%.
 
That trend of less church attendance by voters is mirrored in a 2018 Gallup survey of Americans at large that found even fewer -- 43% -- attend church monthly or more. It was 58% when Gallup asked the question in 1992.
 

"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in Washington DC, January 21, 2017.
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