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Valued Social Butterfly
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Re: Beware: Disinformation Campaign of 2020

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Message 21 of 25

OH, yes - just vote for the designation of that "D" beside their name - Isn't that what most people do anyway - vote for the party and know little about the candidate at all levels of government.

 

Seems elections at all levels would be much fairer if all those designates "D", "R", "I", "Incumbant" were erased - people would then have to research the actual candidates and pick their poison.

 

We have dumbed down the voters to picking their candidate based on their party affiliation, name recognition, or those currently in office or what's in it for me rather than what is good for the country in their opinion.  We take what we think, to be the gospel - might not even be true - but it is still the gospel.  I'm right, you're wrong or You're right, I'm wrong.  Perhaps we should all just take our voting info from ET.

 

What good does it do to keep expanding the numbers of voters - if they are dumbed down voters.

No wonder we have a divided nation.

 

I recall in my area, voters were asking for pictures of the candidates be posted in the local paper before the election with a short spill on their stance on issues..  Worked so well (not), overwelming votes for those who were black with NO even related experience, disregarding those who had done service for a very long time and were doing a great job.  Soon after election, recall campaigns started cause the election went to unqualified, unscrupulous characters who had numerous court cases against them - criminal and civil.  2nd time around, we got at least qualified, seemingly upstanding elected official regardless of color - but the voting number in the new election was but a handful of people.

 

Just like some here think the 2016 Presidential election went- electing a nonqualified, unscrupulous character - have we learned nothing.  The "R"s don't have a monopoly on them. 

 

 

 

* * * * It's Always Something . . . Roseanne Roseannadanna
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Respected Social Butterfly
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Re: Beware: Disinformation Campaign of 2020

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Message 22 of 25

Indeed, we've already seen this.  People love and believe their Facebooks.  It's a troll's gold mine!  I daresay some of the memes will make an appearance on this very board, if not already.

 

Our own president uses the "dissemination of memes, hashtags, misinformation and distortions of their positions" to spread disinformation and outrageous lies.



    

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Valued Social Butterfly
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Re: Beware: Disinformation Campaign of 2020

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Message 23 of 25

The Far Right will play as dirty and lie as much as they have to. The Russians will cyber attack along the way. 

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Valued Social Butterfly
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Re: Beware: Disinformation Campaign of 2020

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Message 24 of 25

The idea is to cause chaos and division among D's during the primary season. This is the only way Trump wins.

 

Debate the issues. Fine. Choose a favorite. Fine. Vote! Then support the nominee even if it wasn't your first choice. This is how D's win. 

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Valued Social Butterfly
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Beware: Disinformation Campaign of 2020

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Message 25 of 25

Politico reports:  It reads in part . . . 

 

Sustained and ongoing’ disinformation assault targets Dem presidential candidates

A coordinated barrage of social media attacks suggests the involvement of foreign state actors.

02/20/2019 06:05 AM EST

 

A POLITICO review of recent data extracted from Twitter and from other platforms, as well as interviews with data scientists and digital campaign strategists, suggests that the goal of the coordinated barrage appears to be undermining the nascent candidacies through the dissemination of memes, hashtags, misinformation and distortions of their positions. But the divisive nature of many of the posts also hints at a broader effort to sow discord and chaos within the Democratic presidential primary.

The cyber propaganda — which frequently picks at the rawest, most sensitive issues in public discourse — is being pushed across a variety of platforms and with a more insidious approach than in the 2016 presidential election, when online attacks designed to polarize and mislead voters first surfaced on a massive scale.

Recent posts that have received widespread dissemination include racially inflammatory memes and messaging involving Harris, O’Rourke and Warren. In Warren’s case, a false narrative surfaced alleging that a blackface doll appeared on a kitchen cabinet in the background of the senator’s New Year’s Eve Instagram livestream.

Not all of the activity is organized. Much of it appears to be organic, a reflection of the politically polarizing nature of some of the candidates. But there are clear signs of a coordinated effort of undetermined size that shares similar characteristics with the computational propaganda (https://comprop.oii.ox.ac.uk/research/ira-political-polarization/ ) attacks launched by online trolls at Russia's Internet Research Agency in the 2016 presidential campaign (https://www.justice.gov/file/1035477/download) which special counsel Robert Mueller accused of aiming to undermine the political process and elevate Donald Trump.

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