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Re: American underworld’ lingo to the White House

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@gruffstuff wrote:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/amphtml/nation/2018/12/17/calling-michael-cohen-rat-trump-brings-amer...

 

Calling Michael Cohen a ‘Rat,’ Trump brings ‘American underworld’ lingo to the White House

 

 

“Talk low or I’ll kill you,” the officer told a young Alphonse Capone, dressed in a blue shirt, green pajama bottoms and shoes with no socks. He had accosted the hoodlum outside his Brooklyn home, fearful that Capone might reveal that he had recently seen the policeman flee the scene of a crime.

 

 

“I’m no rat,” Capone assured the officer, as recounted in “Young Al Capone: The Untold Story of Scarface in New York, 1899-1925,” by John and William Balsamo.

 

 

Capone’s rise to power as a prohibition-era gangster roughly coincides with the use of the rodent name for someone who “secretly aids the police to apprehend criminals,” as defined in the “Dictionary of the American Underworld Lingo.” Experts date its use in the “underworld” — the abode of criminals and organized crime — to 1902, while it began to be employed by police in the 1920s, as they squeezed the underlings of gangsters and mafia bosses enriching themselves in the illicit liquor trade.

 

 

But in 2018, “rat” is the language that emanates from the White House. President Trump applied the term on Sunday to his former attorney, Michael Cohen, who told a federal court that the president had directed him in violating campaign finance law, including by buying the silence of two women who claimed to have had affairs with Trump before he became president.

 

 

A federal judge last week sentenced Cohen to three years in prison, in a development that dramatized just one of the numerous legal woes facing the president, which reach nearly every aspect of his business and political life.

 

 

In a tweet on Sunday, the president argued that law enforcement had used improper means in turning Cohen, once a loyal fixer, into an informant, or a “Rat.” In April, FBI agents raided Cohen’s Manhattan office, home and hotel room, seizing, among other material, communications between Cohen and Trump — a fact that led the president to declare attorney-client privilege “dead.”

 

 

They “BROKE INTO AN ATTORNEY’S OFFICE!” Trump raged over the weekend, even though law enforcement obtained a warrant to do so. Trump then suggested that authorities should instead have infiltrated Democratic headquarters to expose his opponent — in an apparent endorsement of the sort of tactics employed by President Richard M. Nixon in 1972.

 

 

No shortage of ink has been spilled on the president’s bizarre Twitter locutions, from “Smocking Gun” to “very legal & very cool.” Typos, excessive capitalization, misnomers and dubious terminology have become occasions for the president’s detractors to have a laugh at his expense.

Yet, some saw in his language on Sunday something darker — a window into his legal worldview, even perhaps an unwitting acknowledgment of the highly consequential role his former fixer is now playing in assembling possible evidence against him.

 

 

Andy McCarthy, a former assistant U.S. attorney and Fox News contributor, weighed in on Twitter, informing the president of the ominous associations of his language.

 

 

“You should stop,” he advised.

 

 

 


Why should this be a surprise to anyone. Trump was part of the underworld all his business life and used this lingo all his life as did the people he was in business with. The people who voted for him voted for a mob type leader and that is what the USA got. You get what you elect

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American underworld’ lingo to the White House

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https://www.washingtonpost.com/amphtml/nation/2018/12/17/calling-michael-cohen-rat-trump-brings-amer...

 

Calling Michael Cohen a ‘Rat,’ Trump brings ‘American underworld’ lingo to the White House

 

 

“Talk low or I’ll kill you,” the officer told a young Alphonse Capone, dressed in a blue shirt, green pajama bottoms and shoes with no socks. He had accosted the hoodlum outside his Brooklyn home, fearful that Capone might reveal that he had recently seen the policeman flee the scene of a crime.

 

 

“I’m no rat,” Capone assured the officer, as recounted in “Young Al Capone: The Untold Story of Scarface in New York, 1899-1925,” by John and William Balsamo.

 

 

Capone’s rise to power as a prohibition-era gangster roughly coincides with the use of the rodent name for someone who “secretly aids the police to apprehend criminals,” as defined in the “Dictionary of the American Underworld Lingo.” Experts date its use in the “underworld” — the abode of criminals and organized crime — to 1902, while it began to be employed by police in the 1920s, as they squeezed the underlings of gangsters and mafia bosses enriching themselves in the illicit liquor trade.

 

 

But in 2018, “rat” is the language that emanates from the White House. President Trump applied the term on Sunday to his former attorney, Michael Cohen, who told a federal court that the president had directed him in violating campaign finance law, including by buying the silence of two women who claimed to have had affairs with Trump before he became president.

 

 

A federal judge last week sentenced Cohen to three years in prison, in a development that dramatized just one of the numerous legal woes facing the president, which reach nearly every aspect of his business and political life.

 

 

In a tweet on Sunday, the president argued that law enforcement had used improper means in turning Cohen, once a loyal fixer, into an informant, or a “Rat.” In April, FBI agents raided Cohen’s Manhattan office, home and hotel room, seizing, among other material, communications between Cohen and Trump — a fact that led the president to declare attorney-client privilege “dead.”

 

 

They “BROKE INTO AN ATTORNEY’S OFFICE!” Trump raged over the weekend, even though law enforcement obtained a warrant to do so. Trump then suggested that authorities should instead have infiltrated Democratic headquarters to expose his opponent — in an apparent endorsement of the sort of tactics employed by President Richard M. Nixon in 1972.

 

 

No shortage of ink has been spilled on the president’s bizarre Twitter locutions, from “Smocking Gun” to “very legal & very cool.” Typos, excessive capitalization, misnomers and dubious terminology have become occasions for the president’s detractors to have a laugh at his expense.

Yet, some saw in his language on Sunday something darker — a window into his legal worldview, even perhaps an unwitting acknowledgment of the highly consequential role his former fixer is now playing in assembling possible evidence against him.

 

 

Andy McCarthy, a former assistant U.S. attorney and Fox News contributor, weighed in on Twitter, informing the president of the ominous associations of his language.

 

 

“You should stop,” he advised.

 

 

 

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