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I think that Republicans and tRump may be shooting themselves in the foot by the way they are handling the Pandemic and the resulting lay-offs and record unemployment.

 

People are frustrated and the Republicans are exasperating that frustration by delaying their unemployment benefits, refusing to expand it and extend the Federal assistance so that people can feed their families and boost the economy, which would actually put more people back to work.  People are exasperated at the Republicans and Trump for not handling the Pandemic properly, allowing the numbers of infection to climb so high, and not providing enough  personal protective equipment and testing capabilities.

 

The Republicans and tRump are 'blowing it' before our very eyes. The light at the end of the tunnel?  A BLUE WAVE IN 2020 !


Man learns from history that man learns nothing from history.
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Yes, it is. 
Unemployment lines, food lines, testing lines, voting lines...all part of the trump 

“burn it down strategy”. Make people wait. 

But, also remember a trump prime directive...fear and division...just what his boss putin wants...bring the US to it’s knees, and now be a weakened nation. 

Rise up...let’s disappoint trump and putin!

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A very dark feeling

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https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/a-very-dark-feeling-hundreds-camp-out-in-oklahoma-unemployme... 

 

‘A very dark feeling’: Hundreds camp out in Oklahoma unemployment lines

 

TULSA — John Jolley never thought he'd be sleeping in his car awaiting unemployment benefits. But there he was, the owner of a once-successful advertising agency, taking a sweaty nap in a Subaru wagon in a convention center parking lot at 1:45 a.m. on a Wednesday.

 

 

The pandemic sent his business into a free fall, and now Jolley wanted to be first in line for an unemployment claims event beginning in five hours. He barely dozed, afraid that if he fell into a deep sleep, he would miss the early-morning handout of tickets for appointments with state agents.

 

 

There would be just 400 tickets handed out for that day’s event. When those ran out, there would be 400 more for appointments the following day.

“I just didn’t want to be number 803,” Jolley said.

 

 

 

In the four months since the pandemic began, nearly 50 million workers have filed unemployment claims nationwide, a flood that’s overwhelmed some states, freezing antiquated computer systems and jamming websites and phone lines for days. State benefit agencies in some parts of the country have evoked memories of Great Depression bread lines.

 
 

Many have been struggling to get their regular unemployment benefits as well as the $600-a-week federal pandemic unemployment assistance passed in March that begins running out for millions of Americans later this week. Congress returned Monday to begin hammering out the details of another massive coronavirus package, with Republicans assembling a $1 trillion package that probably will extend but reduce the size of that benefit. Democrats are backing a more wide-ranging $3 trillion relief bill passed by the House in May.

 

 

In Oklahoma, one of the poorest states, unemployment — which reached a record 14.7 percent in April — has pushed many to the point of desperation, with savings depleted, cars repossessed and homes being sold for cash.

 

 

Even though the unemployment rate dropped to 6.6 percent in June, the backlog has created unprecedented delays. Oklahoma had approved 235,000 of about 590,000 filed claims by June 21 — a total $2.4 billion payout, far more than in previous years. About 6,000 state claims are pending.

 
 

The Oklahoma Employment Security Commission staff has tried to combat the delays by holding mega-processing events at large arenas in Oklahoma City and Tulsa this month, with masks and social distancing required. So far, they’ve managed to help 6,200 people.

 

 

Jolley’s unemployment claim was approved in March but has been stalled, a problem that hasn’t been fixed after nine phone calls and hours on hold with the OESC.

 

 

The 58-year-old single father arrived in the parking lot of the River Spirit Expo center in Tulsa around 9 p.m. on a sultry night with a heat index approaching 100 degrees. The landmark 75-foot statue of the Golden Driller — a nod to Tulsa’s oil and gas hub — towered over one side of the dark parking lot, his face painted over with a surgical mask.

 

 

 

Dozens more sat in the parking lot overnight with Jolley, unable to get their questions answered through the unemployment agency’s overloaded phone system. Some said they had been notified their claim was denied as fraudulent. Jolley quickly bonded with the woman in the next car over, a manicurist named Cindy La, 60, the two swapping tips on how they thought the event would unfold.

 
 
 

That afternoon, as Jolley gathered up the paperwork he’d need for his claim, he felt a sense of sadness as profound as anything he’d felt since the pandemic began.

 

 

“It’s a very dark feeling,” he said. “You just kind of feel like you’re in a boat without a rudder and you’re riding the waves. After all these years you worked hard at your company, tried to be a good guy and be fair to your clients, you just feel like you’re losing control of your future.”

 

 

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