A Look at Universal Health Coverage in Eight Countries

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Sorry Gail,  sorry guys and gals, but after reading all the posts I can see that we are not ready to accept a  National health Care system

Many because they don't understand the economic of the what it takes to implement a plan such as this one. and others because they can't accept to have anyone tell them what they have to  do.

The issues are the same. the answers have always been the same. We need a system that will be designed for the usage of the US and not a copy of what others have ,or a copy of what we presently have.

We need to  take first  the costs of the drugs and the Hospital  costs before we even design a plan that will cover ALL  Americans.

We are not there. I at this point have doubts that we ever will.

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A Look at Universal Health Coverage in Eight Countries
 
 
How many of these plans look like the ACA, how do they pay for it, and what does the GOP want to replace the ACA with, what will that cost, who will it insure, and how is it paid for,
 
 
 
My advice to anyone paying attention to Brexit and what is going on in Europe is don't buy a pig in a poke.
 
 
Put different plans up side up side, compare the benefits and the costs,  how it's paid for, and who pays for it.  
 
 
One thing I will say, and it's just my uninformed opinion, those numbers would look a lot worse for the USA if not for Medicare. 
 
 
 

 

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I do not understand your point. If I take my car to be serviced, I am NOT the one deciding whether I need a new part or not yet this is a commodity. If I go to the hospital for a procedure, it is routine (a commodity) to them regardless of how unique it is for me.  The economics are the same. It does not matter if my insurance is private or through a universal "group" where premiums are collected by the government. 

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@Richva wrote:

Health care should be treated as a commodity. It should be provided at the lowest cost possible to the largest number of residents possible. 


NO, Richva, it is the doctor or professional medical provider that tells the patient what they need.

The patient doesn't get to do the prescribing - they get what is prescribed.

 

I assume you have heard about this relatively new proton beam cancer therapy.  It has served some types of cancer patients well but it has only just been tested in other types of cancer with mixed results.  Anyway, it is very expensive - after a hospital or treatment center has gone to the BIG expense of putting in the equipment.  The use of proton beam therapy has accelerated rapidly in recent years as medical centers have raced to capitalize on its clinical and financial potential.

 

Of course, it would be better for the treating institutions to treat more and more cancer patients with it - they can make their money back faster and go on to profit.  But the treatment has to be approved for the type cancer which the individual have - and not all are.  Insurance does not cover it IF IT IS NOT APPROVED FOR THEIR Dx.

 

KHN 05/02/2018 - As Proton Centers Struggle, A Sign Of A Health Care Bubble?

 

So now the cancer patient hordes start screaming for for it - filing lawsuits. 

 

Traditional Medicare beneficiaries are allowed to be commodity shoppers in their healthcare - they can self-refer themselves to any doctor or specialist that accepts Medicare assignment.  They might have a primary care physician but they don't go to see him for some things, they go to a specialist - ALL KINDS.

 

Hey, if you have Traditional Medicare with a Plan F Medigap - there is NO out of pocket for you.

Even doing away with these cadillac medigap plans just leaves one with a few bucks out of pocket for a Plan G Medigap.

 

No wonder we have so many seniors on long list of meds, some of which are contraindicated with others they are taking- the right hand doc doesn't know what the left hand doc is doing and the beneficiaries don't share. 

 

You really thnk that stuff like this - the medical commodity shoppers and the medical commodity providers - goes on in other countries?

 

I could name a bunch of other medical commodity shoppers stories - but you understand that the control cannot be in the hands of the patients and other countries realize this - they educate their citizens - I am not sure that is an option for us because of the way we have used healthcare for so long.

 

For a new and hopefully improved health care coverage system - we are all gonna have to change our ways or we will still be paying exhorbitant prices.

 

 

 

 


* * * * It's Always Something . . . Roseanne Roseannadanna
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@Richva wrote:

Health care should be treated as a commodity. It should be provided at the lowest cost possible to the largest number of residents possible. 


Sorry you can not do it that way and get the lowest cost and best results. Everyone has to be in the same rating pool, and have the same basic coverage for all to get the best rate, and outcome. Trying treating it as a commodity is one reason we got us into this mess.

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Health care should be treated as a commodity. It should be provided at the lowest cost possible to the largest number of residents possible. 

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@Richva 

 

Nice charts showing the differences in countries in health care outcomes - We know all that -

NOW, what are they doing that we don't do -   Let's look and see -

 

Your link said . . . . .

Hospital admissions for certain chronic diseases like circulatory conditions, asthma, and diabetes, can arise when prevention services are either not being adhered to or delivered. Hospital admission rates in the U.S. are higher than in comparable countries for congestive heart failure, asthma, and complications due to diabetes.

 

However, the U.S. has lower rates of hospitalization for hypertension than comparably wealthy countries do on average. In total across these four disease categories, the United States has a 37% higher rate of hospital admissions than the average of other countries.

 

1.  We have preventive services especially since the advent of Obamacare - so what is the problem:  Heck, even Medicare beneficiaries don't get preventive services.  Look at this measles vaccine problem we are having right now.   The Welcome to Medicare nor the Annual Medicare Wellness assessment are NEITHER preventive care - they are evaluations for a plan to begin preventive care.

Reuters 06/11/2018 - Most Americans miss out on preventive healthcare

 

2.  People are STILL using the ER even though they are covered by public or private insurance

NYT UpShot - 01/29/2018 - Preventive Care Saves Money? Sorry, It’s Too Good to Be True

 

I could go on but let's look at how some of these other countries do this.

 

Some of them make their citizens pick a "gatekeeper" - a gatekeeper is a primary care physician that the person has to see before they are referred to a specialist.  This medical professional should know them, inside and out - this is where they get or begin their preventive services.

 

2.  Other countries are also very good at including actual science based criteria in their systems - this criteria helps to focus the preventive care to those who science has determined are at the greatest risk whether by age, genetics, susceptibility - this help to prevent OVER-TREATMENT, which we have lots of here in the US.

 

I won't bore you with more - but it would be great if we could look at all the things that other countries do that we don't that adds to this higher cost and poorer outcomes.  Lack of coverage is only part of the equation and that could be remedied easily but it is much more that that - Americans look at health care as a commodity and use it that way - that has to change if you want it to be a right -


* * * * It's Always Something . . . Roseanne Roseannadanna
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In addition to having THE most expensive health care system in the world and the most expensive for private insurance, our health care system fails in comparison to outcomes in those countries which are paying far less than we are. This is a situation where we are paying more and getting less. If we were operating in a sane economic environment, we would be emulating the successful countries. 

 

 

 

https://www.healthsystemtracker.org/chart-collection/quality-u-s-healthcare-system-compare-countries...

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A Look at Universal Health Coverage in Eight Countries

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CommonWealth Fund.org - March 22, 2019 - A Look at Universal Health Coverage in Eight Countries

 

Other high-income nations manage to insure all their residents and spend less per capita than the U.S. But some of them do that by covering everyone through a regulated system of health plans, while others truly have a single public plan for everyone.

 

Countries also diverge in their approaches to financing health care — relying on different combinations of taxes, premium contributions, and cost-sharing — and in how they control growth in overall costs. Finally, while nearly all the health systems feature a role for private insurance — a fact that might surprise many in the U.S. — its size varies considerably.

 

This is a closer look at how eight of our peer countries get to universal coverage, how much they pay for their health care, and what role private insurance plays in each.

 

. . . . The health systems described here all get to universal coverage while paying less for health care — and often with better health outcomes — than the United States. If we as a nation aim to achieve similar results, it will be informative for lawmakers to carefully consider the full range of options these other systems represent.

 

The imbedded link to other data is also interesting. in comparison -

CommonWealth Fund.org - Multinational Comparisonsof Health Systems Data, 2018

 

 

I am posting just this one for now - Notice we are NOT that far off from several of these countries in our PUBLIC spending - but WAY HIGHER in our PRIVATE and OUT OF POCKET spending.

 

Screenshot_2019-05-27 Commonwealth Fund Multinational Comparisons of Health Systems - Multinational Comparisons of Health S[...].png

 


* * * * It's Always Something . . . Roseanne Roseannadanna
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