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Re: 15,000 Migrant Children Now Held

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Message 21 of 25

@rk9152 wrote:

@LydiaN586309 wrote:

@gruffstuff wrote:

 Almost 15,000 Migrant Children Now Held At Nearly Full Shelters 

The number of immigrant children being held in government custody has reached almost 15,000, putting a network of federally contracted shelters across the country near capacity. 

The national network of more than 100 shelters are 92 percent full, according to the Department of Health and Human Services. The situation is forcing the government to consider a range of options, possibly including releasing children more quickly to sponsors in the United States or expanding the already crowded shelter network.

***********************************

My question is what are we going to do with these children?  Are we going to keep them incarcerated indefinitely?  Are we going to "raise" another permanent underclass who will serve as America's nuevo in-house migrant worker?  Afterall, once the borders are closed, "somebody's" gotta pick those apples and grapes, mow our lawns and do our yardwork, and work on construction sites for very low wages often paid "under the table" by unscrupulous employers!  (Please recognize snarky sarcasm here).  But the questions remain:   How many more children will be detained and housed in these "camps?" (I won't call them concentration camps just yet, even though that's what it seems they are).  Further, if there is no plan to return them to their families or their countries of origin, what is the longer term plan?  How much is this grand Trumpian plan going to cost the American taxpayer?  And who is profitting from all of this?  Because as with everything Trump,  "profit"  is always the bottomline!

 

I don't see any profit involved in those kids. As to the parents, I hope they are locked up for child abuse for putting their children in such dangerous conditions. 

 


 


For 242 YEARS, seeking a better life in America was a Worldwide dream. Only since Putin installed the Orange Toad in the WhiteHouse has pursuing that dream lead the dreamer into "dangerous conditions".

 

As for "profit"involved with these underage refugees, that would be the tens of millions being funneled into the pockets of the scum running the Infant Gulag for Trump. That $760/day would put EVERY immigrant family into a very nice hotel, but instead lil donny doles it out to his Corporate Oligarchs who have the kids sleeping on concrete floors in abandoned Walmarts with a mylar "space blankets" for comfort, being watched over by guards who have NO background check involved in getting their jobs, and will (and have) beat a child sensless for refusing to OBEY.

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Re: 15,000 Migrant Children Now Held

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Message 22 of 25

@LydiaN586309 wrote:

@gruffstuff wrote:

 Almost 15,000 Migrant Children Now Held At Nearly Full Shelters 

The number of immigrant children being held in government custody has reached almost 15,000, putting a network of federally contracted shelters across the country near capacity. 

The national network of more than 100 shelters are 92 percent full, according to the Department of Health and Human Services. The situation is forcing the government to consider a range of options, possibly including releasing children more quickly to sponsors in the United States or expanding the already crowded shelter network.

***********************************

My question is what are we going to do with these children?  Are we going to keep them incarcerated indefinitely?  Are we going to "raise" another permanent underclass who will serve as America's nuevo in-house migrant worker?  Afterall, once the borders are closed, "somebody's" gotta pick those apples and grapes, mow our lawns and do our yardwork, and work on construction sites for very low wages often paid "under the table" by unscrupulous employers!  (Please recognize snarky sarcasm here).  But the questions remain:   How many more children will be detained and housed in these "camps?" (I won't call them concentration camps just yet, even though that's what it seems they are).  Further, if there is no plan to return them to their families or their countries of origin, what is the longer term plan?  How much is this grand Trumpian plan going to cost the American taxpayer?  And who is profitting from all of this?  Because as with everything Trump,  "profit"  is always the bottomline!

 

I don't see any profit involved in those kids. As to the parents, I hope they are locked up for child abuse for putting their children in such dangerous conditions. 

 

 

 


 


 

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Re: 15,000 Migrant Children Now Held

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Message 23 of 25

The number of children being held capptive in for-profit prisons will only grow because Trump's administration has agreed to pay $790 per day for each child held, and turning them loose will cost a lot of money.

 

So to protect the profits of this Corporate Gulag, lil donny demands that any adults requesting custody of a child being held must have everyone living in their home pass a background investigation while at the same time requiring NO INVESTIGATION INTO THE BACKGROUND OF THE "GUARDS" IN THESE PRISONS.

 

But Trumpettes do not care what is done to the child-prisoners - they are poor and not white AND not old enough to be given slave-wage jobs in the meat packing industry.

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Re: 15,000 Migrant Children Now Held

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Message 24 of 25

@gruffstuff wrote:

 Almost 15,000 Migrant Children Now Held At Nearly Full Shelters 

The number of immigrant children being held in government custody has reached almost 15,000, putting a network of federally contracted shelters across the country near capacity. 

The national network of more than 100 shelters are 92 percent full, according to the Department of Health and Human Services. The situation is forcing the government to consider a range of options, possibly including releasing children more quickly to sponsors in the United States or expanding the already crowded shelter network.

***********************************

My question is what are we going to do with these children?  Are we going to keep them incarcerated indefinitely?  Are we going to "raise" another permanent underclass who will serve as America's nuevo in-house migrant worker?  Afterall, once the borders are closed, "somebody's" gotta pick those apples and grapes, mow our lawns and do our yardwork, and work on construction sites for very low wages often paid "under the table" by unscrupulous employers!  (Please recognize snarky sarcasm here).  But the questions remain:   How many more children will be detained and housed in these "camps?" (I won't call them concentration camps just yet, even though that's what it seems they are).  Further, if there is no plan to return them to their families or their countries of origin, what is the longer term plan?  How much is this grand Trumpian plan going to cost the American taxpayer?  And who is profitting from all of this?  Because as with everything Trump,  "profit"  is always the bottomline!

 

 

 

 


 

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15,000 Migrant Children Now Held

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Message 25 of 25

https://www.npr.org/2018/12/13/676300525/almost-15-000-migrant-children-now-held-at-nearly-full-shel...

 

Almost 15,000 Migrant Children Now Held At Nearly Full Shelters

 

 

The number of immigrant children being held in government custody has reached almost 15,000, putting a network of federally contracted shelters across the country near capacity.

 

 

The national network of more than 100 shelters are 92 percent full, according to the Department of Health and Human Services. The situation is forcing the government to consider a range of options, possibly including releasing children more quickly to sponsors in the United States or expanding the already crowded shelter network.

 

 

Most of migrant children are teenage boys from Central America who travel to the border alone. Many are escaping poverty or gangs, and they plan to ask for asylum and ultimately find work or go to school in the U.S.

 

 

Waves of these so-called unaccompanied children have arrived in recent years, and the numbers are on the rise again. In November, according to Customs and Border Protection, an average of 175 unaccompanied children crossed the southern border every day.

 

 

The largest migrant youth shelter in the country is in Tornillo in remote west Texas. About 2,800 children live in heated, sand-colored tents set up on a patch of desert a few hundred yards from the Rio Grande.

 

The camp is staffed for 3,000 children. It can house up to 3,800 children, but that will require hiring more staff.

 

 

A source familiar with Tornillo's operation, who asked not to be identified because this person had not been authorized to speak to the media, said the shelter is taking in roughly twice as many kids every week as it is able to release. "This is unsustainable," the source said.

 

 

The federal government could add more beds at Tornillo or elsewhere. Another option is to release the minors more quickly to sponsors who agree to take the children — usually a family member who's already living in the U.S. The children stay with this sponsor while their asylum case is pending.

 

 

Federal officials screen the sponsors, but that vetting process has slowed to a crawl because of a new policy that says anyone who lives in the sponsor's house can be fingerprinted for a criminal background check.

 

 

The Trump administration, when implementing the policy earlier this year, said officials are taking these extra precautions to ensure children aren't put in danger.

 

 

If those vetting rules were relaxed, 1,300 children are ready to be released to sponsors, according to the source familiar with the Tornillo operation. The background checks are taking so long that the average stay for a child in Tornillo has now reached 50 days, the source said.

 

 

A senior official with Health and Human Services said it would be "premature" to say what action would be taken to address capacity issues at the shelters. The official spoke on the condition of anonymity because a plan hadn't been finalized.

 

 

When asked whether the government is considering relaxing the screening of sponsor households, the official said that "everything is on the table." The official also said the shelter network could be expanded.

 

"We continue to look for options that don't jeopardize child safety," the senior official said. The official also blamed a broken immigration system that acts as a "perverse incentive" for undocumented children to cross the border in the first place.

 

 

The youth shelters have come under intense scrutiny and criticism from child welfare experts.

"Detention is never in the best interest of a child, especially when it's extended," said Jennifer Podkul, senior director for policy and advocacy at Kids In Need of Defense. "It's bad for the child's mental and physical health."

 

 

Podkul said child welfare experts agree it's best to put kids in smaller facilities, not larger ones, where they can be affected by isolation and illness.

 

 

Protesters, including congressional Democrats, have been coming from across the country to the fence line at Tornillo to denounce the facility.

 

 

Vince Perez, the El Paso county commissioner whose precinct includes Tornillo, wants the facility to close. "We're already battling the perception that [El Paso County] is inherently a violent place. Now you have a massive detention facility where you have thousands of children detained there. It's deplorable," Perez said.

 

 

Last month, the Office of Inspector General at Health and Human Services identified two "significant vulnerabilities" at Tornillo. The contractor, BCFS, did not conduct FBI fingerprint background checks on its 2,000 staffers, though it had performed routine criminal background checks. And the facility lacked enough mental health clinicians for the swelling number of children.

 

 

The nonprofit says it is addressing both deficiencies.

 

 

BCSF officials have defended the camp, insisting that it is not a detention facility and that the employees are not guards. They say every child has access to three hot meals, snacks, education classes, medical care, soccer games, movie nights and, soon, Christmas festivities.

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