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Re: What do you collect? Repeat.

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Message 41 of 50

@Frozenoem wrote:

 

 

Last is a query how do we accumulate 50 towels, blankets, sheets for more things I have no recollection of ever owning. 

 

@Frozenoem

I dunno. I have a full set of decorative towels purchased specifically for a master bath we owned for 18 months. They were never used. The whole collecton --floor mats, everything-- are using up space in the linen cupboard, where they've been for over 12 years. They were spendy, though, and so maybe I'll use them in the (future) RV ... argh ... it is a sickness. Please. Send. Help. Smiley Happy

 

I do have a few family artifacts, though these are things specific to those few months Dad was on the reservation with me and I don't think they'd mean anything to anyone else in the family. But I have them until I decide for sure that they belong in an ebay auction. Or the dump. Or whatever.

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Re: What do you collect? Repeat.

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Message 42 of 50

Shucks, former collector of books, auctioned 50 history of civil war off. Old English illustrated prints, the types with fox and hounds torn and turned into expensive wall art.

 

Downsizing slowly barely 300 books remain. When I ran out of bookcases I built more.

 

Dishes not mine, Noritake and Bone China not mine.Cut glass not mine - great to the fourth grandmother Terhunes' if the kids don't want it - sold.

Slowly selling.

 

Radios 1937 - 1965. Guilty, selling this summer. Stereos and speakers only 3 remain, down from 10 and not, little boomboxes. Course not - Teac, Technic, and Kenwood, with belt driven turntables and 1-200 lb studio grade speakers.

 

Test equipment for the above vacuum tubes all, oscilloscopes, frequency generators, etc. I have an issue with all things electronic.

 

Approximately 10 laptops going back to 386sx, and massive 10 MB hard drives.

HD for 100 desktops, some will become wind chimes or stripped for magnets. I really haven't required around 50 of them for parts in 5 years. 

 

Recoveries of hard drives sometimes meant rebuilding them to get stuff off. The fun is gone😞.

 

Finally the very last - carpentry tools dating to 1905 and before, with my fathers first 1938 electric saw. Still works and weighs a ton, yeah guilty still use it. Made for those times when the portable rechargeable doesn't have enough oomph.

 

Last is a query how do we accumulate 50 towels, blankets, sheets for more things I have no recollection of ever owning. 

 

Frozen

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Re: What do you collect? Repeat.

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Message 43 of 50

@PattyDiane - I have a large collection of books too, many bought over the years at garage & estate sales. I have my "already read" books separate, and when I moved into this house with large windows & less wall space, 2 bookcases of "already read" books went directly down to the basement rec room. There are still 4 bookcases in the great room, and another 2 in my office!

 

I could get rid of the books in the basement, but with so many people reading via electronic devices these days, that would feel like taking a pet to an animal shelter where they euthanize them, if they're not adopted within a short period of time!! Smiley Sad


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Re: What do you collect? Repeat.

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Message 44 of 50

@PattyDiane Hoboy do I feel ya!

 

 

Most my collections are small, and fit either a theme or a design need. I have a rule that has kept me from needing a storage unit for my collections: everything I bring home must have a place. That means a spot off the floor. If there is no such place, I give away something in order to create one. (yeah, ouch) I did have what I referred to as artful stacks of books on chairs, but in the past 3 years I literally forced myself to give away hundreds of tomes so presently only have one such art installation. Smiley Wink First I boxed the books and stuck them in a closet for a year. Then one day I got my moxie out and drove the boxes to Goodwill. It felt (mostly) good, but I confess I have more to pare and haven't been able to conceive the doing. 

 

 

Reform has been challenging. Downsizing ahead of retirement is our goal, so I just keep telling myself what a waste it would be to buy something only to have to stick it in my own garage sale in a few years time. Anyway, I already have a huge post-retirement ebay career waiting for me ... if I want it.

 

Maybe there should be a 12 step program for the likes of me.

 

 

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Re: What do you collect? Repeat.

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I  have  a  large  music  CD  collection.  Been  collecting  them since  they  first  came  out. I  still  buy  CD 'S  every  once  in  a  while  on  Amazon  if  I  hear  a  song  I  really  like.

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Message 46 of 50

I'm a collecter of everything, or some might say hoarder.  My biggest collection and the one I'm still adding to is books.  I ran out of bookcase space years ago and now have stacks everywhere.  I can't stand the idea of getting rid of them.  Some I've actually read more than once and others I think I will.  I have some paperbacks that originally sold for 50 cents, which will tell you how old they are.

 

The other think I'm still buying is art supplies, even though I haven't actually used any of them in a while.  But I'm trying to get a space cleared out with good light where I can get into it again.  Progess is getting made in that direction.  I also need to say that this collection is more than just paint, brushes and paper/canvases.  I have often been into paper mache' and 3-dimensional work involving recycled and found objects so you can imagine all the things that fall into that category.

 

I'm proud of myself that I'm no longer adding to my collection of fabric, however I know if I was to set foot into a fabric store it would not be a good thing.

 

It's also been a long time since I've added to my collection of Teddy Bears (and other stuffed animals), dolls (especially Madam Alexander dolls), angels or Christmas ornaments.  That being said, temptations happen often so it might change at any time.

 

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Re: What do you collect? Repeat.

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Thanks to the wonderful 60's TV show "Flipper",I became a life long fan of dolphins. I have a couple of books/coasters,ceramic pieces/'beanie babies',bookmarkers. I wear a dolphin ring&necklace which I rarely take off. Any time there is a special about these intelligent mammals,I watch. I have the DVD,'A Dolphin's Tale''11 ,true story of 'Winter" who lost her tail in an accident.The marine biologists  help her recover by designing an artifical tail for her. Sue

Walkers Take It All In Strides
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Re: What do you collect? Repeat.

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Message 48 of 50

Hello, my name is Epster and I'm a collectaholic...  Oh @DaveMcK, why'd ya hafta ask this? I've been so good for the past 3 years: I haven't picked up one piece for any of my collections. In the past (ahem) I have collected:

 

fruit packing labels.jpg

 

 glass orbs.jpg

 

 Denby Avignon.jpg

 

 stained glass.jpg

 

 milk glass.jpg

 

 vintage hat pins.jpg

 

I forgot to mention books. Or vintage tatting. Or handmade lace. Story people prints. Tea cups, oh those tea cups... Did I mention antique baskets? Handmade wooden bowls?

 

 

Epster, chanting: I am done with collecting. I am done with collecting. I am done with collecting. No, really. I am done with collecting.

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Re: What do you collect? Repeat.

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Message 49 of 50

I collect carnival glass & nipponware.

Carnival Glass Dish.jpg     Nipponware Cup & Saucer.jpg

 

I also have small South American ceramic animals & birds


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What do you collect? Repeat.

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Message 50 of 50

Mary and I have been collectin Fiestaware for years. We have both Vintage and Post 86 in a cross section of the  coolerstate from over the years. Here is a little history of this American made dinnerware:

Homer and Shakespeare

Homer and Shakespeare Laughlin, two brothers from East Liverpool, Ohio, formed a partnership in 1871 to sell pottery ware, which was made in the factories located in their hometown.

The pottery industry in East Liverpool had begun in the 1840's, manufacturing yellow ware from the rich deposits of local clay and utilizing the Ohio River to transport their products throughout the region. By 1870, public preference was shifting from the relatively crude yellow ware to a more sophisticated white ware that was being imported from England. Local potters saw the need for change and the East Liverpool City Council offered $5,000 in seed money to someone who would build and operate a pottery for the production of white ware.

The Laughlin Brothers submitted a proposal which was accepted by the Council and a two kiln plant was built on the banks of the Ohio River in 1873. The plant was built on land purchased from Benjamin Harker for $300. Mr. Harker's pottery was located next door.

The Laughlin Brothers quickly gained a reputation for quality and, in 1876, their white granite ware won an award at the United States Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia.

By 1877, Shakespeare, the younger brother, was ready to move on to pursue other interests. The business was continued as an individual enterprise as the Homer Laughlin China Works. The business continued to prosper through the 1880's and became one of the better known manufacturers of ceramic dinnerware and toilet ware in the United States.

The 1930's & 1940's

Almost coincidental with the opening of the last great Newell plant was the retirement of W. E. Wells in January, 1930. He was replaced as general manager by his eldest son, Joseph M. Wells, Sr.

The company had hired Frederick Hurten Rhead as design director in 1927, a post which he would hold until his death in 1942. Rhead's 15 year reign proved to be the most prolific period of new product introductions in the company's history. Rhead designed Virginia Rose as well as the several Eggshell shapes. Rhead's most famous accomplishment, however, was Fiesta.
Marcus Aaron retired as president of the company in 1940 and was succeeded by his son, Marcus Lester Aaron. M. L. Aaron would serve as president for the next forty-eight years.

With Fiesta leading the way, The Homer Laughlin China Company continued to flourish until the onset of World War II. During the war years, much of the company's production was shifted to the production of china for our armed forces. After the war, production returned to normal and the company reached its peak production year in 1948. More than 3,000 workers were employed to produce over ten million dozen pieces of ware.

The New Century and New Life for HLC

As Fiesta began to flourish in the retail sector and Homer Laughlin was becoming a leading force in the foodservice china industry, the aging factories were undergoing many changes.
State-of-the-art computerized kilns were installed throughout plants 6, 7 and 8. Much-needed new forming and glazing equipment was installed and a self-contained "plant within a plant" was built at Plant #8. Homer Laughlin was preparing to enter the new millennium as the industry leader in both the foodservice and retail businesses.

By 2002, ownership of the company was shared by third, fourth and fifth generation members of the Wells and Aaron families and others. Many of the shareholders were scattered throughout the country and had little involvement with the business. In an effort to consolidate resources and provide improved direction for the company, Joe Wells III, together with his sisters, Jean Wicks and Elizabeth McIlvain, purchased the interests of the other stockholders. In June, 2002, Joe Wells III was elected president and chief executive officer. After serving for a decade, Joe stepped down and his sister Liz McIlvain took over as president in 2012. Her position marks the first woman president in the company’s history, as well as the first time the presidency was passed between siblings instead of from father to son.

Since the re-organization, the company has experienced continued growth and is poised to move forward with the Wells Family's pledge to continue producing quality, American made china and provide jobs for potters of the Ohio Valley.

Continue Shopping

 

The photo below shows many of the colors and items available which we many of.

fiesta_header.jpg

 

fbadf31bb51419c57ef895b0fa196b79-1.jpg

Our newest vintage item shown above is a vintage red egg cup from the early 1930's.

Posted by Dave the Lighthouse Keeper
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