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WHAT'S SPECIAL ABOUT TODAY?

Today is March 24th and it is:

World Tuberculosis Day

 

World Tuberculosis Day is a worldwide event that aims to raise public awareness about tuberculosis and the efforts made to prevent and treat this disease. This event is held on March 24 each year and is promoted by organizations such as the World Health Organization (WHO).

 

March 24th marks the day in 1882 when Dr. Robert Koch detected the cause of tuberculosis--the TB bacillus. This was a first step towards diagnosing and curing tuberculosis. World Tuberculosis Day can be traced back to 1982, when the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease launched World TB Day on March 24 that year, to coincide with the 100th anniversary of Dr. Koch’s discovery.

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I plan on posting interesting tidbits about each day/date of the calendar.  I hope others will add to it as well.  It can be related to any subject as long as it happened on or is correlated in some way with that particular date.

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NATIONAL BUGS BUNNY DAY

National Bugs Bunny Day on April 30th commemorates the date the famous bunny first appeared in a short film in 1938. 

Known for his comical antics, Bugs Bunny created memorable roles in Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies cartoons produced by Warner Bros. The wascally wabbit caused many a raucous scene for his castmates Daffy Duck, Yosemite Sam, Porky Pig, Pepe Le Pew, and Marvin the Martian. However, his eminent counterpart was forever the estimable hunter, Elmer Fudd. 

His popular catchphrase, “What’s up, doc?” continues to be associated with the humorous bunny. He first appeared in 1938 in Porky’s Hare Hunt as a Happy Rabbit but later solidified his character as Bugs Bunny in the 1940 A Wild Hare

Over the years, various actors have voiced the animated bunny. However, Mel Blanc originally voiced the iconic “Eh, what’s up, doc?” voice and he did so for almost 50 years. 

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BIRD DAY

We honor our feathered friends on several holidays called Bird Day in the United States. The day celebrates birds of all kinds across North America.

With over 2,000 species of birds in North America, birdwatchers and nature lovers alike will appreciate the beauty and variety of these winged friends offer. From songbirds to waterfowl and domesticated birds, they come in every color of plumage and wingspan.

During the spring, migrating birds move to their summer nesting grounds. It’s an excellent time for those new to birdwatching to learn to identify birds by species. Enthusiasts also know that birds will migrate through backyards and stop for a rest, a bite to eat, and a drink if the right habitat is provided. They stand prepared by their windows with binoculars and watch as new visitors arrive daily. Whether it’s an oriole, a tree swallow, the ruby-throated hummingbird, or an American Finch, you’ll want to make sure you’ve prepared food, natural habitat and water sources for your guests.

However, it’s not just the passersby that get birdists excited. It’s the long term residents and those of the greater outdoors. Year after year they watch robins collect their nesting material or chickadees caring for their brood. They wander through nature preserves seeking a glimpse of a varied thrush or a prairie warbler. When they do, they are often graced with a privileged view of a bald eagle soaring above them.

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I am positively BLESSED...yes, BLESSED that over my land is a major, migratory bird path.  I have a multitude of different kinds of birds...sometimes up to 30 or even 40 cardinals on my feeders and the trees around them at one time.  Since there is a river very nearby, I am entertained by eagles, hawks, herons, vultures, and other large raptors.  It is a positive delight to watch my Summer layovers come in the Spring, and be replaced by my "snow birds" in the Winter.  From sunup to sundown, I am treated to all sorts of birdsongs that I can now identify, and the birds have come to trust me to the point of some I can hold in my hand.  My hummers will come inches from my face.

Birding is so cool and so exciting.  I'd recommend it to everyone!!   Thanks for letting me share part of my world with you!

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HAPPY BIRTHDAY BUGS!!!

I never get tired of watching your cartoons!!!

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NATIONAL AMARETTO DAY

On April 19th, National Amaretto Day recognizes a liqueur known around the world for its flavor and aroma. 

The word Amaretto in Italian means “a little bitter,” because it is made from bitter almonds or apricot kernels or both. Makers infuse it in pure alcohol or brandy, resulting in a strong almond flavor. This traditionally Italian liqueur carries a reputation for being fragrant.

Shrouded in Secrecy and Lore

Taking us back to the 1525 Renaissance in Saronno, Italy, painter Bernardino Luini selected a young innkeeper as his model for a fresco of the Madonna of the Miracles. In gratitude for being selected, the innkeeper gave the artist a gift of her own secret blend of almond and brandy. For centuries, the family held the recipe as a closely guarded secret. However, the Di Saronno family began producing its amaretto for a broader market in the 20th century. The liqueur began appearing for sale in advertisements in the United States in the late 1940s, and the family still bottles their recipe today.

Another Amaretto tale comes from the same area of Italy. However, this story tells of a young Lazzaroni couple blessed by the Cardinal of Milan in 1718. The couple honored his visit with a unique recipe of their own, producing an amaretto cookie like no other. And this one came also came in a bottle. Of course, they also closely guarded their recipe generations. In 1851, the Lazzaroni family began selling their amaretto liqueur, and the family is still producing it today.

HOW TO OBSERVE #NationalAmarettoDay

Amaretto can be enjoyed in several ways. Whether you bake or mix a drink, celebrate the day with the flavor of amaretto. The aroma alone is quite satisfying. The amaretto sour is likely the most familiar amaretto cocktail. However, amaretto also complements coffee and citrus beverages, too. Thanks to amaretto flavor syrups you can also enjoy delicious mocktails.

But you don’t have to stop there for an amaretto flavor. Baked amaretto also makes for delicious baked goods! Experiment with recipes or share your favorites. We even have a recipe for you to try.

Ready for a cocktail that’s part drink, part dessert, and 100 percent irresistible? Try Amaretto Coffee! When Alex and I first tried this boozy coffee drink, we expected it to taste good. But one sip and our eyes widened. Wowza, is this stuff good! It’s one of those flavor combinations that’s years beyond the sum of its parts. The amaretto brings a nuttiness and spice to the coffee that’s hard to quantify in words. Topped with frothy whipped cream and a sprinkle of cinnamon, it’s truly to die for.

 

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Mmmmm.   Amaretto is my most FAVORITE LIQUOR!  So thanks for the info, and a toast to everyone!!

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Wonderful excuse for one of my favorite treats - amaretto cherry ice cream! Thanks for posting this notice, and the interesting history.

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NATIONAL DEEP DISH PIZZA DAY

On April 5th, National Deep Dish Pizza Day gives pizza lovers a day to celebrate one of America’s favorite varieties of pizza. 

Whether it’s dine-in, delivered, take out or homemade, deep-dish pizza satisfies pizza lovers all across the country. Pick whatever toppings you like. This day focuses on the deep crust that holds an amazing amount of sauce and toppings. Like other styles of pizza, the deep-dish menu offers a variety of combinations to choose from. If you prefer an all meat pizza, the deep-dish makes it. Top it with vegetables galore. Or order extra mushrooms, the deep-dish can manage. 

 

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NATIONAL NOUGAT DAY    

National Nougat Day on March 26th celebrates a soft and chewy or sometimes hard and crunchy candy often found at the center of a candy bar. 

Made by whipping egg whites together and adding honey or sugar, roasted nuts, and sometimes candied fruit, some say nougat has been a sweet treat since ancient Rome. Enjoyed both as a candy all on its own or paired with chocolate or other flavorings.
 
Recipes range from the more traditional nougat made with almonds and honey to those with hints of citrus.
 
In Italy, they call it torrone. In Spain, a nougat is called turrón. The United States has a version made with corn syrup called divinity.

Three basic kinds of nougats include:

1.     White nougat – made with beaten egg whites and honey.
2.     Brown nougat – made without egg whites and has a firmer, often crunchy texture.
3.     Viennese or German nougat – chocolate and nut praline

In the United States, modern candy bar makers use a different recipe than the traditional nougat. Today they make of a mixture of sucrose and corn syrup aerated with a whipping agent such as egg white or hydrolyzed soy protein or gelatin. It is the preferred and often used ingredient of large candy companies because it is inexpensive to make and used as a filler.

Varieties of nougat are found in:
3 Musketeers, Mars, Snickers, Milky Way, Zero, Salted Nut Rolls, Reese’s Fast Break, Reese’s Whipps, Baby Ruth, and others.

HOW TO OBSERVE #NationalNougatDay

This holiday offers an opportunity to become a nougat aficionado. Or perhaps try learning the nuances of nougat. No matter how you spend the day, be sure to get a sample or two. Whether it’s a big bite or small, enjoy some nougats. Be sure to share a piece, too! Use #NationalNougatDay to post on social media.

NATIONAL NOUGAT DAY HISTORY

National Day Calendar continues researching the origin of this confectionary holiday.

 

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So many "Nationals!"  What's a body to do????   😗

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National Crabmeat Day is celebrated on March 9th of every year. Crabmeat is the meat found in a crab. Crabmeat is used in many cuisines across the world for its soft, delicate, sweet taste. Brown crab, blue crabs, blue swimming crabs, and red swimming crabs are the most commercially available crabmeat globally. For the U.S. market, the crab meat comes in different forms, depending on which part of the crab’s body which comes from and the overall size of the crab from where the meat is taken. Imitation crab meat is widely used in the United States of America as a replacement for 100% crab meat, due to the labour-intensive process of extracting fresh crab meat, and is popularly used in American sushi. Imitation crab is made with a fish called surimi. Crabmeat is widely used to cook crab cocktails, crab cakes, pasta, risotto, gazpacho or eggs benedict. National Crabmeat Day is for all crab meat fans to celebrate their favourite seafood.

 

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On March 2nd every year, it’s time to celebrate cream pie – banana cream pie, to be precise. On this day, pie lovers in the United States raise a spoon to one of the most popular sweet treats in the country. And if you want to join in with your own banana cream pie, don’t worry – there’s no law that says you have to share!

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It is Groundhog Day and six more weeks of winter

Shari
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@DaveMcK 

(Just realizing she totally missed the day, she very quietly leaves a small trophy with a grumpy man's face next to Dave's favorite chair and tiptoes away.)

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lol @DaveMcK 

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Mardi Gras, or Fat Tuesday, refers to events of the Carnival celebration, beginning on or after the Christian feasts of the Epiphany and culminating on the day before Ash Wednesday, which is known as Shrove Tuesday.

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The best ever flavor combo!The best ever flavor combo!

 

Happy Chocolate Mint Day! February 19th.

 

 

National Chocolate Mint Day celebrates the unusual yet delicious flavor which has become a classic over time. The combination seems to make for a healthy alternative. Chocolate helps produce serotonin and dopamine, and the combination of that with mint overall makes for a healthier candy. Mint is also a powerful herb which aids digestion and fabulously freshens breath. This triumphant flavor combination means an entire day dedicated to its taste and vigor. Announced by the United States National Confectioners Association, national Chocolate Mint Day honors the flavor pairing and reflects the mishmash of these two flavors and their popularity.

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NATIONAL CHERRY PIE DAY

Some pie lovers will be eating their favorite pie on February 20 during National Cherry Pie Day. Whether they eat it for breakfast, lunch or supper or a slice at every meal depends on just how much they love cherry pie!

It seems only right that we celebrate the cherry pie so close to Presidents Day as we all know the story (albeit untrue) of President George Washington and the cherry tree. Cherries were, however, one of his favorite foods.    

According to the American Pie Council, the pie came to America with the first English settlers. The early colonists cooked their pies in long narrow pans calling them “coffyns” like the crust in England.  As in Roman times, the early American pie crusts often were not eaten, but just designed to hold the filling during baking. It was during the American Revolution that the term crust was used instead of “coffyn.”

In the United States, cherry pie is often referred to as a “great American dish.” Recipe books have many different versions of recipes for cherry pie.

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How fitting for National Chocolate Mint Day... At 3:40 today my mom took her last breath. We had Peppermint Patties in her room, as these were her all time favorite candy!

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NATIONAL CHERRY MONTH

Since the cherry trees come to life in February, it’s the perfect time for National Cherry Month! Throughout Washington D.C., the cherry blossoms burst to life just in time for the National Cherry Blossom Festival.

This annual event began in 1912. The people of Japan sent 3,000 cherry trees as a gift to the United States as a symbol of friendship between two nations. A single cherry looks a bit like a little heart, and February is the month of love. Since Presidents Day is February and one particular president is paired with chopping down a cherry tree – folklore or not – February and cherries just go together.

HOW TO OBSERVE

Add some cherries to your shopping list. You can mix them into your breakfast or snacks. They’re good for you and packed full of antioxidants, too!

While you’re making your list, visit the National Day Calendar recipe page for cherry inspiration! Use #NationalCherryMonth to share on social media.

HISTORY

Michigan Governor William G. Milliken first proclaimed February as National Cherry Month

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NATIONAL CHEESE LOVER’S DAY

On National Cheese Lover’s Day, don’t feel bleu, throw a feta or act capricious. January 20th is a gouda day to kummin over and have some cheddar or asiago or fontina! 

There is no firm evidence of how cheese making was discovered. but legend tells us it was likely by chance that someone created the first cheese. Thousands of years ago, people transported milk and stored it in sheep’s stomachs. Left to sit a few days, the proteins would separate into curds and whey. From there, preserving the solids with salt may have seemed a logical next step. Salt was a highly valued preservative in ancient times.

The earliest record of cheese making dates back to 5,500 BCE in what is now Poland. Today there are over 1,400 varieties of cheese.

Basic Cheese Making

The basic principles behind making cheese are quite simple. Let the milk sour (or scientifically, coagulating the casein protein). Then separate the curds (solids) from the whey (liquid). The curds are then salted and left to age.

Bacteria, enzymes or fungi may be added at various stages. These along with the type of milk, temperature, time, and moisture are all controlled to produced the desired taste, color, and texture. Herbs and spices may also be added.

The nutritional value of cheese varies depending on the variety. Cottage and mozzarella cheese are at the lower end of fat and calories per serving while mascarpone and cream cheese pack it on. Marscapone makes desserts like tiramisu rich and creamy. 

For the Love of Cheese

For cheese lovers who think one day is just not enough to celebrate cheese, National Day Calendar presents a calendar full of cheesy celebrations. There are 18 other cheese specific holidays on the calendar. 

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The Statue of Freedom
The crowning feature of the Dome of the U.S. Capitol stands 19 feet 6 inches tall and weighs approximately 15,000 pounds.
The Statue of Freedom is a classical female figure with long, flowing hair wearing a helmet with a crest composed of an eagle’s head and feathers. She wears a classical dress secured with a brooch inscribed "U.S." Over it is draped a heavy, flowing, toga-like robe fringed with fur and decorative balls. Her right hand rests upon the hilt of a sheathed sword wrapped in a scarf; in her left hand she holds a laurel wreath of victory and the shield of the United States with 13 stripes.
Last night she was repeatedly raped by a mob that claimed to represent America. They do not represent "We the people" that my fellow Veterans but their lives on the line over the decades to protect everyone's right to speak out peacefully to help build a better country for everyone. Tens of thousands gave their lives to protect and help build a better Democracy for everyone! It is now time to move forward to restore America to being a kinder place for all of US!

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Happy Birthday To All Of Our AARP January Birthday Members From Here On The Front Porch!

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Face it. We love chocolate. Many of us can’t help but add a bar or two while we’re checking out at the grocery store — that is, if we don’t already have a bag of fun-sized chocolates in the cart. Snack all you want on December 28 because it’s National Chocolate Candy Day. So if you missed the treats on Halloween or need a last sugary fix before the new year, spend some quality time with chocolate candy!

 

NATIONAL CHOCOLATE CANDY DAY TIMELINE

 
1828
New Inventions, New Chocolate Creations.

Dutch chemist Coenraad Van Houten invented a hydraulic press that could separate the cocoa butter from the cacao, thereby producing a powder.

 
1870s
The First Chocolate Easter Egg

Rodolphe Lindt's invention of the conching machine resulted in the mass production of chocolate, paving the way for John Cadbury to introduce his first chocolate egg.

 
1900
Hershey Bar is born!

Chocolate - once considered a luxury for the wealthy, is made affordable by Milton Hershey.

 
1945
Hershey goes to War

By the end of World War II, the entire Hershey plant was producing ration bars at a rate of 24 million a week.

 

NATIONAL CHOCOLATE CANDY DAY ACTIVITIES

  1. Eat all the chocolates

    Whether you're feeling the wonderful combination that is peanut butter and chocolate or are more of a chocolate and caramel fan, indulge in every kind of chocolate candy. See if you can guess the filling before reading the description.

  2. Give some as a gift

    Why wait until Valentine's Day to share some chocolate Kisses with someone?

  3. Try making some chocolate candies

    Have fun with it and pick out some cool molds.

WHY WE LOVE NATIONAL CHOCOLATE CANDY DAY

  1. It gives us an excuse to eat all those chocolate gifts we just received

    Whether it's the fun-sized chocolate candies in our stockings, or a bag of ornament-shaped chocolates, we have a new reason to indulge.

  2. Dark chocolate can improve our health

    A quality dark chocolate bar contains soluble fiber and plenty of antioxidants to deem this a beneficial sweet treat. That said, enjoy everything in moderation.

  3. Chocolate makes us feel good

    We can't seem to help getting giddy over chocolate. Science can back us up on this too. Studies show chocolate may temporarily help alleviate symptoms of anxiety and depression.

     

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NATIONAL CANDY CANE DAY

National Candy Cane Day on December 26th gives candy lovers a day to celebrate the red and white striped candies found abundantly during the holidays. 

In 1844, a recipe for a straight peppermint candy stick, which was white with colored stripes, was published. However, some stories tell of all-white candy sticks in much earlier times. Folklore tells of the origin of the candy cane, yet no documented proof of its real beginning. Literature begins mentioning the candy cane in 1866, and it was first known to be mentioned in connection with Christmas in 1874. As early as 1882, candy canes have been hung on Christmas trees.

Fun Candy Cane Facts:
  • The average candy cane is 5 inches tall.
  • While most candy canes are not sugar or calorie-free, they do not have any fat or cholesterol.
  • Striped red and white candy canes were first introduced in 1900.
  • The first machine to make candy canes were invented in 1921 by Brasher O. Westerfield. Until then, they were made by hand.
  • Bob McCormack and his brother-in-law & priest Gregory Keller brought the candy cane to the masses. What started out as candy making for McCormack’s friends and family turned into mass production when Keller invented the machine that enabled Bob’s Candies to go big time.
  • Traditionally the flavor for candy canes is peppermint, but there are a variety of flavors.
  • Alain Roby, Geneva pastry chef, holds the Guinness World Record for the longest candy cane, measuring 51 feet long.

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National Eggnog Day raises a holiday toast once a year on the day before Christmas. Also known as egg milk punch, eggnog is a popular drink throughout the United States during the holidays.

The sweetened dairy-based beverage is traditionally made with milk and cream, sugar, whipped eggs, and spices. When served at parties and holiday get-togethers, liquor is often added to the eggnog. Many people prefer brandy, rum, whiskey, bourbon, or vodka. Sometimes they even mix up a combination. For added holiday cheer, garnish the glass with a sprinkle of cinnamon, nutmeg, or pumpkin spice.

Eggnog also flavors other holiday treats, too. For example, you can find eggnog flavored coffees, teas, baked goods, and puddings at your grocery store. You may even have a few recipes of your own to spice up your holiday baking, too! 

Even though the origin of the eggnog drink is debated, many believe that the drink initially developed in East Anglia, England. However, others believe it originated as a medieval European beverage made with hot milk.

 

While gathering together with family and friends, enjoy a glass or two of eggnog! Other ways to enjoy the day include baking eggnog flavored goodies. Make a seasonal ice cream or another holiday treat to share. We’ve included a few recipes for you to try. 

 

Eggnog Cookies


Eggnog Bread Pudding

Use #NationalEggnogDay to post on social media.

NATIONAL EGGNOG DAY HISTORY

As we’ve not yet discovered the creator of this beverage holiday, National Day Calendar is finding the research to be delicious!

 

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WINTER SOLSTICE

The winter solstice is the shortest day and longest night of the year in the Northern Hemisphere. It occurs annually between December 20th and December 23rd.

The winter solstice is marked by the point at which the North Pole is at its farthest from the sun during its yearly orbit around the sun. It will be approximately 23 degrees away from the sun.  Despite the temperature outside, the winter solstice is considered the astronomical beginning of winter. Meteorological winter begins December 1st and lasts until the end of February. It’s marked by the coldest average temperatures during the year.

Depending on how far north a person is in the Northern Hemisphere during the winter, their day can range from 9.5 hours to absolutely no sunrise at all.  On the bright side, the days will gradually become longer in the Northern Hemisphere until the summer solstice in June. In the Southern Hemisphere, this same day marks the summer solstice and the Southern Hemisphere’s longest day of the year.

The vernal equinox and the autumnal equinox conventionally mark the beginning of spring and fall respectively and occur when night and day are approximately equal in length.

Around the world since ancient times to modern-day, celebrations, festivals, rituals and holidays recognizing the winter solstice have varied from culture to culture.

HOW TO OBSERVE #WinterSolstice

Winter lovers, enjoy the shortest day of the year. Those longing for more sunlight, prepare to celebrate. Longer days are ahead. Use #WinterSolstice to post on social media.

WINTER SOLSTICE HISTORY

Since the marking of time and the earliest calendars, this day marked the hardest time of the year for early people.  Survival was paramount when food and heat are not reliable.  In all corners of the Earth, there are ancient remains that seem to have been built around marking the winter solstice.

  • Probably the most famous of these is Stonehenge, England. Every year when the sun sets on the winter solstice, the sun’s rays align with two of the giant stones known as the central Altar and the Slaughter stone.
  • As the sun rises the day of the winter solstice, its rays illuminate the main chambers of the monument dating back to 3200 B.C. at Newgrange, Ireland.
  • In Tulum, Mexico an ancient Mayan city stands deserted. At the top of one of these buildings, a small hole casts a starburst when the sun rises on the winter and summer solstices.

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NATIONAL PFEFFERNUSSE DAY

December 23rd is reserved for National Pfeffernusse Day, a German spice cookie. Very popular around the holidays, pfeffernusse are fluffy cookies made with ground nuts and spices and covered in powdered sugar.

The exact origin of the cookie is unknown. However, the Dutch believe that pfeffernusse (or pepernoten) are linked to the feast of Sinterklaas, which is celebrated on December 5 in the Netherlands and December 6 in Germany and Belgium. This holiday is when children receive gifts from St. Nicholas, who is partially the inspiration for the Santa Claus tradition. 

Over time, many bakers have created their own pfeffernusse recipes. Traditional methods included various nuts such as almonds and walnuts. Some modern recipes exclude nuts altogether along with the black pepper, retaining only cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, allspice, and cardamom as flavorings. Bakers also use molasses and honey to sweeten the cookie

HOW TO OBSERVE #NationalPfeffernusseDay

Break out your favorite pfeffernusse recipe and start baking. This is one holiday tradition that will bring back memories for many of you. Not only will you be able to savor the delicious spicy-sweet cookies, but you can also pass down the tradition to another generation. Once you have a good stack of them baked and cooled, package them up as sweet gifts for loved ones. 

 

Do you have recipes to share? Be sure to use #NationalPfeffernusseDay to post on social media.

NATIONAL PFEFFERNUSSE DAY HISTORY

National Day Calendar continues researching the origins of this spicy cookie. While we do, we also encourage you to keep sampling and snacking on the recipes as you explore the fascinating holidays throughout the year. 

 

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