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Re: So where are you from?

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Message 11 of 35

Mom knew her father''s parents were from Ireland, her mother's were a mixture of French, English and Dutch, Dad's mother's parents were from Poland and his father's were from Germany and Ireland.  One of Mom's cousins traced her mother's roots back 16 generations to when the family left England and came to PA getting a land grant from William Penn.  I found out I have an ancestor who fought in Revolutionary War for America. I already knew Mom's  maternal grandfather had served in Union Army but when we got records from National Archives, we found out he had been a cavalry scout, one of the most dangerous jobs in the military.  And from the roots research my cousin did, I found out I have another ancestor who also fought in Civil War, not in MO but for another state.  I have looked up old census records and did find out some things about my paternal grandma, who died when Dad was 2, her parents were from Poland and she had 5 siblings, he never met any of them.  

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Re: So where are you from?

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WHAT SHOULD HAVE BEEN CALLED "LA MESA", TEXAS, BUT WE KNEW AS "LAMISA"- NEXT DOOR TO MIDLAND/ODESSA( MIDESSA, BUT I THINK THEY SHOULD CALL IT "ODLAND"! LET'S JUST SAY WEST TEXAS! MATERNAL ANCESTORS WERE "SCOTCH-IRISH" FROM CAINS, GWINNETT, GEORGIA.
SUPERGIRL, NO REALLY I MEAN IT! HER REAL NAME & MINE ARE THE SAME( FIRST 2 NAMES ARE)
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Re: So where are you from?

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All sides of my family come from small towns in and around Katzdorf and Bodendorf, Austria (near Linz). They immigrated to Sheboygan County, WI in 1857.  My parents visited us while my husband and I were stationed with the USAF in Germany. Dad wanted to see if we could find were our ancestors came from taking a trip via the ‘zug’ (train). I thought it would be similar to finding a needle in a haystack but I was wrong! We found the town, talked to the parish priest who had our ancestors parish records (baptism etc) in an old parish book and visited the home (yes it was still there) where my great-grandfather’s family had lived. I still am thankful and awed by my father’s ability to help us find this. Hands-on genealogy continued to be his hobby/passion until his death in 2010. 

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Re: So where are you from?

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Message 14 of 35

I am orginially from the southeastern African coast from the Coast of Hope or Cape Delgado or what is not present day Mozambique and Madagascar.  My relatives lived free in Wilmington, Delaware.  His or her last names were Comegys.  He married Rachel Tilden, whose parents were Mary and William Tilden.  This marriage occurred in the 1850s.  

 

My dad's relatives have roots that go back as far as Egypt, but some family members lived free in Caroline County, Maryland, in 1850 according to the United States Census.

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Re: So where are you from?

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My father was an illegal allien in New York back in 1944. He was from an island in Croatia,Yugoslavia, and was working as a merchant marine. He jumped ship when it got to New York City, where we had relatives. My mother's parents were born on the same island in Yugoslavia. In fact, my maternal grandmother almost married my paternal grandfather before she left for America. I still have many relatives on that island (Olib), I keep in touch with them and have visited there several times.

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Re: So where are you from?

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My mothers family were long-time Chicago residents with loads of photos and dates, making them very easy to research. My father's parents, like many, were immigrants who came to this country to escape a rougher life in their "old country," under a shroud of lies and half-truths. Researching them and putting together the [ieces has been a lot tougher, but far more rewarding. Paternal Grandfather came thru Ellis Island from Crete after 6th grade and I was able to find the ship records at their genealogy center. Paternal Grandmother was part Hopi and part Mexican. Through 23 and Me I was able to verify the Native American part of my ancestry this past summer. Also through 23 and me I found a cousin who had been given up for adoption opening an entirpaulenger1.jpgpaulengerwjuliaandjoan.jpggeoplanoswar.jpge new side of the family as well as a connection to a beloved Aunt who passed away far too soon. I am always learning new things and making revisions to the family tree as well as kicking myself I didn't ask more questions when these relatives were still alive!

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Re: So where are you from?

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Message 17 of 35

My husband & I did the ancestry.com DNA test last year and found out that we are 5th cousins! However our name is one of the hardest to trace for genealogy ancestors! Go figure! Our name currently is Robison, but my maiden name was Robinson. We know that there are a group of surnames that all come from whichever is the "root" surname actually is. We hold dna from Scandinavia - Scotland - Ireland- Wales-England to America, then New England to Pennsylvania or Virginia to West Virginia, and then both to Ohio and beyond! Whew! Currently are at a standstill on both lines and could use any help that anyone out there could offer us! Best of luck to anyone on the name of their ancestors and all the different spellings!

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Re: So where are you from?

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Message 18 of 35

My grandmother's family goes back to President James Madison who would be my great-great-great uncle.  We have traced it further to England.  My father's family has been traced back to Scotland in the 1100's.  I had a cousin on each side of the family who spent a lot of time researching.  They both printed off the information and gave it to each family.  Since, the 1700's, we have lived mostly in central and eastern Virginia.  A few took wrong turns and ended up in Ohio, Florida, Missouri,. and California.  We still love them though!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Re: So where are you from?

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Message 19 of 35

I know of my paternal ancestors through a sister who's done much research. My father, 3 sisters, I and our kids descend from a William Merrell, a fisherman and barrel maker. He was born circa 1530 in or near either the village of Honington or the village of Shipston-on-Stour in Warwickshire England. That's as far back as the records my sister has discovered, so far. 

Greg
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Re: So where are you from?

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Message 20 of 35

I have decided with my parent's backgrounds, and my grandparents that I am a Heinz 57 variety.  My grandfather was German, my grandmother was Texan.  My mother is from them, so that leaves me about 1/4 German.  My dad's side was from New York, and Italy, and a few other places.  For me it's best to say the 57 variety.  It doesn't change who any of us are or were, but we made it and they did an awesome job coming from wherever and doing their best to add to our culture.  It doesn't matter really.  We should be thankful for who we are and where ever we came from, because we ended up in the United States.

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