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M&M stands for Mars and Murrie.

Forrest Mars (son of the Mars Company founder) first spotted the British confection Smarties during the Spanish Civil War and noticed the candy shell prevented the chocolate from melting. He teamed up with Bruce Murrie (son of Hershey Chocolate's president) and the company later trademarked the "Melts in Your Mouth, Not in Your Hand" slogan.

m-and-m-candy-1545931176.jpg

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Prevention & Treatment of the Coronavirus
 
Prevention

There is currently no vaccine to prevent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to this virus. However, as a reminder, CDC always recommends everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
  • Stay home when you are sick.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipe.
  • Follow CDC’s recommendations for using a facemask.
    • CDC does not recommend that people who are well wear a facemask to protect themselves from respiratory diseases, including COVID-19.
    • Facemasks should be used by people who show symptoms of COVID-19 to help prevent the spread of the disease to  others. The use of facemasks is also crucial for health workers and people who are taking care of someone in close settings (at home or in a health care facility).
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom; before eating; and after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.
    • If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. Always wash hands with soap and water if hands are visibly dirty.

Treatment

There is no specific antiviral treatment recommended for COVID-19.

 

People with COVID-19 should receive supportive care to help relieve symptoms. For severe cases, treatment should include care to support vital organ functions.

People who think they may have been exposed to COVID-19 should contact their healthcare provider immediately.

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Did you know there was a prehistoric dragonfly that's wings spanned more than two feet?

Meganeura-prehistoric-dragonflyWikimedia Commons/Dodoni

More than 300 million years ago, the Meganeura established itself as the largest known flying insect to ever exist on Earth. The dragonfly-like creature had a wingspan that stretched around 2.5 feet. The bugs were also big enough to hunt prey like frogs and newts which it could eat with its teeth-like mandibles. 

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Did you know your body loses up to 8 percent of water in a flight?

Private Airplane fly over clouds and Alps mountain on sunset. Front view of a big passenger or cargo aircraft, business jet, airline. Transportation, travel conceptBYCHYKHIN OLEXANDR/SHUTTERSTOCK

Water is our body’s mechanical oil—without it, it can’t function. You lose about 8 percentof your body water while on a flight. This is because the humidity in the climate-controlled environment can be as low as 10 to 15 percent. Here’s more about what happens to your body on an airplane.

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Did you know Queen Elizabeth II keeps track of when she wore each outfit?

Queen Elizabeth IISHUTTERSTOCK

It’s rumored that Queen Elizabeth never wears the same hat twice. If she did, she waits years to wear them again, and evidently, there’s a spreadsheet recording her exact outfit per day. So, what does she do with all of those hats? A one-time-only exhibit showcased the many hats and handbags she wore during public engagements. If you couldn’t make it to that exhibit, this epic timeline of Queen Elizabeth’s wackiest hats will fill you in.

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"Nope!  But thanks fer tellin' me!"

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History did you knows

  • Did you knowCoca-Cola originally contained cocaine
  • Did you know the Internet was originally called ARPANet (Advanced Research Projects Agency Network) designed by the US department of defense
  • Did you knowthe first Burger King was opened in Florida Miami in 1954
  • Did you knowAustralia was originally called New Holland
  • Did you knowin 1878 the first telephone book made contained only 50 names
  • Did you knowCoca Cola launched its 3rd product Sprite in 1961
  • Did you knowpaper originated from China
  • Did you knowinstant coffee was invented in 1901
  • Did you knowthe word 'testify' derived from a time when men were required to swear on their testicles
  • Did you knowtennis was originally played with bare hands
  • Did you knowthe Olympic flag was designed in 1913
  • Did you knowthe electric toothbrush was invented in 1939
  • Did you knowIsaac Newton invented the cat door
  • Did you knowthe Titanic was built in Belfast
  • Did you knowHawaii was originally called the Sandwich Islands
  • Did you knowthe doorbell was invented in 1831
  • Did you knowThe first English dictionary was written in 1755
  • Did you knowTokyo was once known as Edo
  • Did you knowthe tea bag was invented in 1908
  • Did you knowplastic bottles were first used for soft drinks in 1970
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Where do they grow?
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Did you know that there is a little-known fruit that tastes like peanut M&Ms?  A collection of berries.

Hackberries are native to North America and were used extensively by Native Americans as a source of food and medicine. They are high in calories, protein, and sugars, so they make a great trail snack that can be gathered directly from the tree during a hike. The only catch is that these trees can be quite tall. To access the berries, you’ll have to hope some branches are low enough to be in reach or knock them off with a stick.

The texture of the fruits is similar to a peanut M&M. They have a sweet, dry pulp and a crispy shell enclosing a hard, edible seed at their center. They don’t melt in your hand or your mouth, but each bite offers a delicious, candy-like taste along with a satisfying crunch. The pulp is very sweet, with a flavor similar to dates and black tea.

The main drawback is that the seeds can be very hard. Native Americans got around this problem by pounding the berries into a paste or powder that they then stirred into porridge or used to season meat.

 
Need to Know

Hackberries are not sold commercially, so you'll need to forage them. To safely identify the trees and their fruit, you should thoroughly research their appearance. The hackberry tree has a distinct warty, gray-brown bark. Fruits ripen in the fall and do not generally rot on the tree, so you can collect them even during the winter.

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10 Fascinating Facts About Butterflies

Butterfly sipping nectar.

Steven Allen/The Image Bank/Getty Images

 
Butterfly wings are transparent

How can that be? We know butterflies as perhaps the most colorful, vibrant insects around! A butterfly's wings are covered by thousands of tiny scales, and these scales reflect light in different colors. But underneath all of those scales, a butterfly wing is actually formed by layers of chitin, the same protein that makes up an insect's exoskeleton. These layers are so thin you can see right through them. As a butterfly ages, scales fall off the wings, leaving spots of transparency where the chitin layer is exposed.

Butterflies taste with their feetImage result for pics butterflies

Butterflies have taste receptors on their feet to help them find their host plants and locate food. A female butterfly lands on different plants, drumming the leaves with her feet until the plant releases its juices. Spines on the back of her legs have chemoreceptors that detect the right match of plant chemicals. When she identified the right plant, she lays her eggs. A butterfly will also step on its food, using organs that sense dissolved sugars to taste food sources like fermenting fruit.

 
Image result for pics butterfliesButterflies live on an all-liquid diet

Speaking of butterflies eating, adult butterflies can only feed on liquids, usually nectar. Their mouthparts are modified to enable them to drink, but they can't chew solids. A proboscis, which functions as a drinking straw, stays curled up under the butterfly's chin until it finds a source of nectar or other liquid nutrition. It then unfurls the long, tubular structure and sips up a meal. A few butterflies feed on sap, and some even resort to sipping from decaying carrion. No matter the meal, they suck it up a straw.

 
A butterfly must assemble its proboscis as soon as it emerges from the chrysalis

A butterfly that can't drink nectar is doomed. One of its first jobs as an adult butterfly is to assemble its mouthparts. When a new adult emerges from the pupal case or chrysalis, its mouth is in two pieces. Using palpi located adjacent to the proboscis, the butterfly begins working the two parts together to form a single, tubular proboscis. You may see a newly emerged butterfly curling and uncurling the proboscis over and over, testing it out.

Image result for pics butterflies
Butterflies drink from mud puddles

A butterfly cannot live on sugar alone; it needs minerals, too. To supplement its diet of nectar, a butterfly will occasionally sip from mud puddles, which are rich in minerals and salts. This behavior, called puddling, occurs more often in male butterflies, which incorporate the minerals into their sperm. These nutrients are then transferred to the female during mating, and help improve the viability of her eggs.

 
Image result for pics butterfliesButterflies can't fly if they're cold

Butterflies need an ideal body temperature of about 85ºF to fly. Since they're cold-blooded animals, they can't regulate their own body temperatures. The surrounding air temperature has a big impact on their ability to function. If the air temperature falls below 55ºF, butterflies are rendered immobile, unable to flee from predators or feed. When air temperatures range between 82º-100ºF, butterflies can fly with ease. Cooler days require a butterfly to warm up its flight muscles, either by shivering or basking in the sun. Even sun-loving butterflies can get overheated when temperatures soar above 100° F and may seek shade to cool down. 

Image result for pics butterflies
A newly emerged butterfly can't fly

Inside the chrysalis, a developing butterfly waits to emerge with its wings collapsed around its body. When it finally breaks free of the pupal case, it greets the world with tiny, shriveled wings. The butterfly must immediately pump body fluid through its wing veins to expand them. Once its wings reach full-size, the butterfly must rest for a few hours to allow its body to dry and harden before it can take its first flight.

Image result for pics butterflies
Butterflies live just a few weeks, usually

Once it emerges from its chrysalis as an adult, a butterfly has only 2-4 short weeks to live, in most cases. During that time, it focuses all its energy on two tasks – eating and mating. Some of the smallest butterflies, the blues, may only survive a few days. Butterflies that overwinter as adults, like monarchs and mourning cloaks, can live as long as 9 months.

 
Butterflies are nearsighted, but they can see and discriminate a lot of colors

Within about 10-12 feet, butterfly eyesight is quite good. Anything beyond that distance gets a little blurry to a butterfly, though. Butterflies rely on their eyesight for vital tasks, like finding mates of the same species and finding flowers on which to feed. In addition to seeing some of the colors we can see, butterflies can see a range of ultraviolet colors invisible to the human eye. The butterflies themselves may have ultraviolet markings on their wings to help them identify one another and locate potential mates. Flowers, too, display ultraviolet markings that act as traffic signals to incoming pollinators like butterflies – "pollinate me!"

Image result for pics butterflies
 
Butterflies employ all kinds of tricks to keep from being eaten

Butterflies rank pretty low on the food chain, with lots of hungry predators happy to make a meal of them. Some butterflies fold their wings to blend into the background, using camouflage to render themselves all but invisible to predators. Others try the opposite strategy, wearing vibrant colors and patterns that boldly announce their presence. Bright colored insects often pack a toxic punch if eaten, so predators learn to avoid them. Some butterflies aren't toxic at all, but pattern themselves after other species known for their toxicity. By mimicking their foul-tasting cousins, they repel predators.

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