Reply
Highlighted
Contributor

Re: Medicare and auto coverage Part B

1,512 Views
Message 1 of 3

Many thanks.  Point on information.  Much appreciated.

Report Inappropriate Content
Highlighted
Honored Social Butterfly

Re: Medicare and auto coverage Part B

1,554 Views
Message 2 of 3

 


@TomB886736 wrote:

In our auto policy a Part B line item provides medical benefits in case of an injury accident.

 

My question:  if we have Medicare wouldn't that plan cover us adequately in case of an injury accident?  (I realize the coverage also extends to our passengers, but that is not the point of this question).

 

Thanks for what you might be able to offer.


Yes, the Medical part of your auto coverage for yourselves could be kept pretty minimal but there are other consideration and certain stipulations - Auto Insurance wants to assign blame and have the other party pay or you may have to use your no-fault coverage.  Liability coverage - the other guy or your no-fault.

Medicare would want to be paid back for any Recovered amounts.

 

It is described here:

Medicare.gov - How Medicare works with other insurance 

Read this part of the above Medicare page

I HAVE A CLAIM FOR NO-FAULT OR LIABILITY INSURANCE (copy and pasted below)

No-fault insurance or liability insurance pays first and Medicare pays second.

No-fault insurance pays for health care services resulting from injury to you or damage to your property in an accident, regardless of who is at fault for causing the accident. Types of no-fault insurance include:

  • Automobile insurance
  • Homeowners' insurance
  • Commercial insurance plans

Liability insurance protects against claims for negligence—inappropriate action or inaction that results in injury to someone or damage to property. Types of liability insurance include:

  • Homeowners' liability insurance
  • Automobile liability insurance
  • Product liability insurance
  • Malpractice liability insurance
  • Uninsured motorist liability insurance
  • Underinsured motorist liability insurance

     

If the no-fault or liability insurance denies the medical bill or is found not liable for payment, Medicare pays the same as it would if it were the only payer. But, Medicare only pays for Medicare-covered services; you're responsible for your share of the bill—for example, Coinsurance, a Copayment or a Deductible—and for services Medicare doesn't cover.

 

If doctors or other providers are told you have a no-fault or liability insurance claim, they must try to get payments from the insurance company before billing Medicare. But, this may take a long time. If the insurance company doesn't pay the claim promptly (usually within 120 days), your doctor or other provider may bill Medicare. Medicare may make a conditional payment to pay the bill, and then later recover any payments the primary payer should have made.

 

If Medicare makes a conditional payment, and you get a settlement from an insurance company later, the conditional payment from your settlement needs to go to Medicare. You're responsible for making sure Medicare gets repaid for the conditional payment.

 

If you have an insurance claim for your medical expenses, you or your attorney should notify Medicare as soon as possible. If you have questions about a no-fault or liability insurance claim, call the insurance company.

 

If you file a no-fault insurance or liability insurance claim, you or your representative should call the Benefits Coordination & Recovery Center (BCRC) at 1-855-798-2627 (TTY: 1-855-797-2627). 

The BCRC will gather information about any conditional payments Medicare made related to your no-fault insurance or liability insurance claim. If you get a settlement, judgment, award or other payment, you or your representative should contact the BCRC. The BCRC will determine the final repayment amount (if any) on your recovery case and send you a letter asking for repayment.

 

Report Inappropriate Content
Highlighted
Contributor

Medicare and auto coverage Part B

1,568 Views
Message 3 of 3

In our auto policy a Part B line item provides medical benefits in case of an injury accident.

 

My question:  if we have Medicare wouldn't that plan cover us adequately in case of an injury accident?  (I realize the coverage also extends to our passengers, but that is not the point of this question).

 

Thanks for what you might be able to offer.

Report Inappropriate Content
cancel
Showing results for 
Show  only  | Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Users
Announcements

Have a health tip to share or a health question to ask? Check out the Health Tips forum today