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Is AARP United Healthcare Medicare supplimental insurance as bad as the customer reviews say??

Hi,
AARP's Medicare Supplemental Medicare Insurance sounds great... but I decided that before I purchase it I should read the reviews.

I was astounded!

 

Consumer affairs reviews were the worst I have EVER seen for any product or service from any company. People were talking about outright misrepresentation of services, copays, non-existent customer service. Representatives simply hanging up on customers, drug formularies not covering many common medications. Increasing co-pays. A litany of misrepresentation and worse.


Now I understand the Internet. You will always find people more willing to badmouth a product or service than to praise it... but I looked for positive reviews and found none...

 

http://www.consumeraffairs.com/insurance/aarp_medicare.html

 

Is it really this bad? If so why does AARP tolerate this if they are, as they claim, an organization that exists to promote the best interests of senior citizens?

 

Have I simply been looking for reviews of AARP United Healthcare supplemental insurance in the wrong places?

 

Can anyone here describe their own experience with this insurance? I live in California... but will be moving to Arizona...

 

If not AARP/UHC insurance, can anyone here recommend a company for Medicare supplemental insurance with which they have had a positive experience?

 

Thanks

 

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john258 wrote to byrondennis:

Might be hard for you to accept but you gave advice which if I had followed would have cost me over $1,000 per year. It is  up in here so go read it.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

You have mentioned this time and again - can you point me to this "advice" so I can determine what you mean.  Should be easy for you to find and link it or just note the subject of the thread, time and date.

 

 

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@GailL1 wrote:

john258 wrote to byrondennis:

Might be hard for you to accept but you gave advice which if I had followed would have cost me over $1,000 per year. It is  up in here so go read it.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

You have mentioned this time and again - can you point me to this "advice" so I can determine what you mean.  Should be easy for you to find and link it or just note the subject of the thread, time and date.

 

 


Gail, this commenter in chrono comment 54 -- who keeps repeating the same nonsense -- apparently has a reading comprehension problem or perhaps English is not his or her native language... or perhaps a problem understanding the meanings of adjectives and adverbs in English or... or perhaps does not even understand the meaning of the word 'advice' in English. I dunno... quite bizarre. Also I do not pay any attention to the writer of any comment I am commenting on... I almost always comment on the first comment on a Topic, chrono comment 1 - the comment that started the Topic, even if I am the sixth or 16th commenter so I basically have no idea what the commenter is talking about unless it is a Topic started by this commenter.

 

Whatever, the only "advice" I ever give, and I do not even think of it as "advice" but common sense, is to go look at such and such a page in "Medicare and You" or to go to the nearest senior center or like facility. Usually that particular "advice" relates to an explanation of how Medicare works. But I don't comment on that very often. More often I reference a GAO or MedPAC or Trustee document relative to a statistic. I certainly never discussed any 30% discounts or $1000 "savings" with anyone as is claimed (but I might have used a percentage as in "about 30% of the people on Medicare are on Part D").

 

In fact based on the description in chrono comment 54, it sounds like the commenter is saying he or she does not have Part D. But there are a few Part D plans left that cover the donut hole so who knows:

  • Something about the donut hole
  • But he or she does not have a donut hole because he or she has something related to group retirement insurance that includes dental and nurses (but so do a lot of Part C plans?)
  • blah blah indemnity???
  • And he or she saves 30% (30% of what?)

Whatever, his or her whole series of  run-on stream of consciousness comments without English grammar and constantly completely reposting  every comment that came before should be deleted by the moderator.

 

The real irony that both you and I always tell people to go look it up and/or go to the senior center and or give a link, which appears to be what he is criticizing us for not doing. That's why I go back to the reading comprehension problem/ESL assumption

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@byrondennis wrote:

@GailL1 wrote:

john258 wrote to byrondennis:

Might be hard for you to accept but you gave advice which if I had followed would have cost me over $1,000 per year. It is  up in here so go read it.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

You have mentioned this time and again - can you point me to this "advice" so I can determine what you mean.  Should be easy for you to find and link it or just note the subject of the thread, time and date.

 

 


Gail, this commenter in chrono comment 54 -- who keeps repeating the same nonsense -- apparently has a reading comprehension problem or perhaps English is not his or her native language... or perhaps a problem understanding the meanings of adjectives and adverbs in English or... or perhaps does not even understand the meaning of the word 'advice' in English. I dunno... quite bizarre. Also I do not pay any attention to the writer of any comment I am commenting on... I almost always comment on the first comment on a Topic, chrono comment 1 - the comment that started the Topic, even if I am the sixth or 16th commenter so I basically have no idea what the commenter is talking about unless it is a Topic started by this commenter.

 

Whatever, the only "advice" I ever give, and I do not even think of it as "advice" but common sense, is to go look at such and such a page in "Medicare and You" or to go to the nearest senior center or like facility. Usually that particular "advice" relates to an explanation of how Medicare works. But I don't comment on that very often. More often I reference a GAO or MedPAC or Trustee document relative to a statistic. I certainly never discussed any 30% discounts or $1000 "savings" with anyone as is claimed (but I might have used a percentage as in "about 30% of the people on Medicare are on Part D").

 

In fact based on the description in chrono comment 54, it sounds like the commenter is saying he or she does not have Part D. But there are a few Part D plans left that cover the donut hole so who knows:

  • Something about the donut hole
  • But he or she does not have a donut hole because he or she has something related to group retirement insurance that includes dental and nurses (but so do a lot of Part C plans?)
  • blah blah indemnity???
  • And he or she saves 30% (30% of what?)

Whatever, his or her whole series of  run-on stream of consciousness comments without English grammar and constantly completely reposting  every comment that came before should be deleted by the moderator.

 

The real irony that both you and I always tell people to go look it up and/or go to the senior center and or give a link, which appears to be what he is criticizing us for not doing. That's why I go back to the reading comprehension problem/ESL assumption


When facts prove someone wrong they can do one of two things. Accept the truth and change, or make up lies to try and justify what they did. You choose the later. What you do is hurt people badly by what you post telling them how to handle their problems in the Health Insurance field.  You have proven over and over again by your posts and advice you give to people that you have no understanding of the subject. I did not even ask you for advice but was commenting on your advice to another poster. You chose to give me unasked for advice which would have cost me over $1,000 per year. Here is some sound advice for you. Stop what you are doing. AARP should never allow such a problem to be on its web site.

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john258

I looked the thread up and read all the comments.  YOU changed the subject of the thread when you responded to byrondennis without giving any description.  IMO, you sought to confuse the original poster when they were speaking about the donut hole of Part D Medicare - which was the subject of the original post.

 

Personally, I will now only ignore your post.  

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@GailL1 wrote:

john258

I looked the thread up and read all the comments.  YOU changed the subject of the thread when you responded to byrondennis without giving any description.  IMO, you sought to confuse the original poster when they were speaking about the donut hole of Part D Medicare - which was the subject of the original post.

 

Personally, I will now only ignore your post.  


Thanks for the taking the time to do that, Gail. Who knows what's going on there?

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@GailL1 wrote:

john258

I looked the thread up and read all the comments.  YOU changed the subject of the thread when you responded to byrondennis without giving any description.  IMO, you sought to confuse the original poster when they were speaking about the donut hole of Part D Medicare - which was the subject of the original post.

 

Personally, I will now only ignore your post.  


You better re read the post. The only thing you are correct about is it was about the donut hole and I commented on his answer which was bad using my own plan which has none either. I could care less what you ignore, but the one thing neither you nor Dennis can ignore is that you give advice to people which is usually incomplete, or incorrect, and they can be hurt by it. There is no state that would allow this to happen face to face because they have seen the pain and suffering it causes. Dennis did not have to answer me but he did telling me where to go for a cheaper rate. If I had followed what he said and got a cheaper part D rate it would have cost me over $1,000 per year. That is what happens when people who  do not know the subject give advice. Someday I think you might find a person who you  guys hurt badly by bad advice gets a lawyer and sues you, and would include AARP for allowing it on their website. I can not understand for the life of me how people can be so cruel to others just to make themselves look good.

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@GailL1 wrote:

john258 wrote to byrondennis:

Might be hard for you to accept but you gave advice which if I had followed would have cost me over $1,000 per year. It is  up in here so go read it.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

You have mentioned this time and again - can you point me to this "advice" so I can determine what you mean.  Should be easy for you to find and link it or just note the subject of the thread, time and date.

 

 


It was about 2 months ago and I called him out on it so you should have seen it. It should still be up but I am not going to waste my time looking it up. He was giving someone else advice on Part D. I told him what my part D was. No gap, no co-pay on generic, discounted prem of between 30 and 40%, special prices on drugs. He then told me I had a certain type of plan D and should check as I could get a lower price and gave me a ref. (I did not tell him about the 30 to 40% discount.) Well my plan comes from my employer and is tied into medi care supp, dental. On my supp. I have to use Indemnity policy for where I live, but I get just about all the discounts you would get in adv. plan. Gym, eyes, nurse on call etc. I also get a 30 to 40% discount on rates. The rule is you take it all or nothing. If I had changed my part D I would have lost the rest to. He did not know the full story on what I had and was giving me advice that would have cost me over $1,000 per year if I had followed it. Yes it is a very good plan from my employer, and very different from what you usually hear about, and I am lucky. There are other special plans like this out there, and that is why you should never give advice to people who have problems with all health insurance. Let the local expert do it as they will get all the details from the person.

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@john258 wrote:

@GailL1 wrote:

@w269042b wrote:

I'm starting to believe it is really bad. I just signed up with them September 31st and then trying to get a doctor. On the web-site there are many doctors connected to Cleveland Clinic (Weston FL) and it states that they all take new patients but when I called them they really do not accept new patients. I called at least 10 doctors on their list and none accepted me. When I called the Customer Service Help Line and they called the doctors they had the same experience. So none of the doctors listed and connected to the Cleveland Clinic is accepting new patient. Customer Service told me that the list is no being updated and kept current and the doctors told me the same.
This has been a bad experience and I think I should change to another Co-insurance company.

 


You do need to understand that there is a difference in a Medicare Advantage plan and a "medicare supplemental plan aka medigap plan" (the later being the subject of this thread).  You seem to be describing a Medicare Advantage plan, and this differs from the subject of this thread.

 

byrondennis is right - you can change your Medicare Advantage plan at the next open enrollment period in the late fall of this year.  If certain doctors are important to you, check that out 1st before signing up.  However, it is not uncommon for doctors to come and go in some Medicare Advantage plans.

 

If you want better continuity, perhaps you should choose original Medicare - then perhaps buy a Medicare supplemental plan aka Medigap and a prescription drug Part D plan too.  But if you decide to go this route, there could be some hurdles to overcome, depending on your state since many of the enrolling rules for a Medigap policy are made at the state level.


Do you really understand what she is talking about. To me it is evident she does not understand this subject and badly needs the help of a local expert yet you are giving her advice which could really come back and hurt her badly. Why cant you just tell her to see a local expert. I do not understand what joy people get in giving advice to others when it is evident it can hurt them. As I have said in here I was given advice by Dennis (not asked for) that would have cost me over $1,000 per year if I had followed it. Please contact this person and tell them to seek a local expert. They  can go to the AARP Office for names if they need to.


john258,

I did not give advice, only some options which the poster can decide upon, with or without help.

It is apparent that they are not talking about a Medicare supplemental plan.

They can seek out a local person for help or do some self study. Help is listed on the Medicare site by state and it is included in the Medicare and You booklet which we all get each year.

You are free to post your response to the poster - telling them to see a local expert - you can even give them the web address to locate local help (in their state).

Medicare - Find Contact Information

 

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@GailL1 wrote:

@john258 wrote:

@GailL1 wrote:

@w269042b wrote:

I'm starting to believe it is really bad. I just signed up with them September 31st and then trying to get a doctor. On the web-site there are many doctors connected to Cleveland Clinic (Weston FL) and it states that they all take new patients but when I called them they really do not accept new patients. I called at least 10 doctors on their list and none accepted me. When I called the Customer Service Help Line and they called the doctors they had the same experience. So none of the doctors listed and connected to the Cleveland Clinic is accepting new patient. Customer Service told me that the list is no being updated and kept current and the doctors told me the same.
This has been a bad experience and I think I should change to another Co-insurance company.

 


You do need to understand that there is a difference in a Medicare Advantage plan and a "medicare supplemental plan aka medigap plan" (the later being the subject of this thread).  You seem to be describing a Medicare Advantage plan, and this differs from the subject of this thread.

 

byrondennis is right - you can change your Medicare Advantage plan at the next open enrollment period in the late fall of this year.  If certain doctors are important to you, check that out 1st before signing up.  However, it is not uncommon for doctors to come and go in some Medicare Advantage plans.

 

If you want better continuity, perhaps you should choose original Medicare - then perhaps buy a Medicare supplemental plan aka Medigap and a prescription drug Part D plan too.  But if you decide to go this route, there could be some hurdles to overcome, depending on your state since many of the enrolling rules for a Medigap policy are made at the state level.


Do you really understand what she is talking about. To me it is evident she does not understand this subject and badly needs the help of a local expert yet you are giving her advice which could really come back and hurt her badly. Why cant you just tell her to see a local expert. I do not understand what joy people get in giving advice to others when it is evident it can hurt them. As I have said in here I was given advice by Dennis (not asked for) that would have cost me over $1,000 per year if I had followed it. Please contact this person and tell them to seek a local expert. They  can go to the AARP Office for names if they need to.


john258,

I did not give advice, only some options which the poster can decide upon, with or without help.

It is apparent that they are not talking about a Medicare supplemental plan.

They can seek out a local person for help or do some self study. Help is listed on the Medicare site by state and it is included in the Medicare and You booklet which we all get each year.

You are free to post your response to the poster - telling them to see a local expert - you can even give them the web address to locate local help (in their state).

Medicare - Find Contact Information

 


Suggest you go back and reread your post. You gave advice to someone who by their post has no understanding of the subject and badly needs local expert help. It is not apparent what they are talking about since they would seem to have little knowledge of Medicare. When you give advice without knowing everything about their problem you can hurt them badly. I gave you an example of how bad advice could have done that to me. Why cant you give a person real help when it is evident they do not understand their problem and tell them where to go for a local expert. Hurting people can be easy, helping them is harder and requires we put away our own desire to feel like we are an expert.

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@w269042b wrote:

I'm starting to believe it is really bad. I just signed up with them September 31st and then trying to get a doctor. On the web-site there are many doctors connected to Cleveland Clinic (Weston FL) and it states that they all take new patients but when I called them they really do not accept new patients. I called at least 10 doctors on their list and none accepted me. When I called the Customer Service Help Line and they called the doctors they had the same experience. So none of the doctors listed and connected to the Cleveland Clinic is accepting new patient. Customer Service told me that the list is no being updated and kept current and the doctors told me the same. This has been a bad experience and I think I should change to another Co-insurance company.

 


You don't word it this way but yes, the best way to approach Medicare -- or any health insurance I guess -- is with the doctor. 

  • What insurance does your doctor (or do your doctors) take?
  • What about nearby hospitals?

After those questions are answered (sounds like you do not have a doctor), then follow the charts on pages 4 and 5 in the newly released "Medicare and You, 2018" (see Note)

 

NOTE: The new version does not seem to be on the Medicare web site yet but my spouse received a copy in the mail today so I assume they are on the way to everyone. If you only have last year's, see page 17 but it is not as easy to understand as the new information. Given your comment and depending on personal and local conditions (don't post them on this web site), you probably have to time to change for 2017. You can definitely change for 2018 during the upcoming Annual Election Period. Go see the local expert at your nearest senior center or like facility if you are unsure of what these charts mean.

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YES! I am on disability and a veteran. I had back surgery last month and the doctor wrote a persription for extended release pain meds. They said they 72 hours to review for authorization and maybe up to 84 hours. I called and talked with them talked with a supervisor he said he was was sorry but they could not help. He told me to go to the ER and see if I can get an emergency supply.  The ER doesn't do that. They really didn't seem to care about anyone or there pain. All because they can take up to 72 hours. They only wanted to change what kind of medicine or the amount you can take in a day. I will be contacting aarp all of my state and federal reps. And possibly camp out in my travel trailer at there Corp office.  I am so angry with there lack of sempathy and care how much suffering a person will go through.  I will not let this go Un answered!

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United Healthcare is the worst!

Since just starting Medicare, I was told that Plan F was the best.

However, the perscriptions was a separate plan,, no problem, got that throught them as well.....BIG MISTAKE.

I take only 2 meds,,,Protonix & Zetonna (an inhaler) thats it..

My PC had to stop his work and dedicate time to write why I needed the name brand as other products previously tried never worked and resulred in many hospital visits, The generic does not work, as well...

They finally accepted the doctors orders and decided to pay a portion of this drug, that I have taken for years.

Now we get to the Zetonna, another drug they still refuse to help cover.

My ENT doctor just phoned me, on a Sunday no less, to see if I was all set in getting ths covered,,,,

He was very upset when I told him once again it was denied.

He said this group is nothing but "smoke & mirrors" and he's right/

5 times this man has filled out paperwork and sent it in and still, whoever makes this decision in UHC  to decline this med, better have a doctorate degree,

I think its disgusting that some office worker decides what a patient is in need of.

So right now for this spray I pay 750.00.

I am sorry I ever got involved with UHC and I am very sorry that AARP is involved with them...

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@r58721w wrote:

United Healthcare is the worst!

Since just starting Medicare, I was told that Plan F was the best.

However, the perscriptions was a separate plan,, no problem, got that throught them as well.....BIG MISTAKE.

I take only 2 meds,,,Protonix & Zetonna (an inhaler) thats it..

My PC had to stop his work and dedicate time to write why I needed the name brand as other products previously tried never worked and resulred in many hospital visits, The generic does not work, as well...

They finally accepted the doctors orders and decided to pay a portion of this drug, that I have taken for years.

Now we get to the Zetonna, another drug they still refuse to help cover.

My ENT doctor just phoned me, on a Sunday no less, to see if I was all set in getting ths covered,,,,

He was very upset when I told him once again it was denied.

He said this group is nothing but "smoke & mirrors" and he's right/

5 times this man has filled out paperwork and sent it in and still, whoever makes this decision in UHC  to decline this med, better have a doctorate degree,

I think its disgusting that some office worker decides what a patient is in need of.

So right now for this spray I pay 750.00.

I am sorry I ever got involved with UHC and I am very sorry that AARP is involved with them...


I believe that your problem may have less to do with any particular Medicare Part D insurer and more to do with the meds which have been prescribed for you.

 

Since you have decided to stay with Original Medicare (with a supplemental policy to pick up the cost slack), you do have to pick a free standing Medicare Prescription Drug Coverage plan (Part D).

However, you can pick from several different insurance companies that are offering this coverage in your area.

 

Your selection criteria should be based on medicines which you use which are offered on their formulary.  

 

I am not sure that you are gonna find Protonix on a Medicare Part D Insurance plan in brand form since there is an equivalent generic.  Medicare Drug plans would cover the generic of Protonix ( pantoprazole ) - FACT: FDA requires generic drugs to have the same quality and performance as brand name drugs. FDA: Understanding Generic Drugs

 

You will find generics used in the place of brands on many medications and if you really want the brand, then you will have to have your doc ask for the exception as you did and pay the extra cost.

 

GoodRx.com indicates the difference in price in generic vs brand and states that Medicare only covers the generic form.

 

However, you can always check other plans by going through the Medicare Plan Finder (link below) for the brand name to see if any Part D plans do offer these meds on their formulary in brand form.

 

When Open Enrollment opens in the fall of this year, go to this  Medicare site and do personalized search for a better / different Part D plan if there is one, to suite your needs better.

MEDICARE Plan Finder

 

There is a video on the right side of the page if you need to see how to use it.  But here you will be able to list your meds and see what all the companies offering these meds in a Medicare Drug Plan in your area offer - then you can pick the best one for your current needs.  Remember, you can change companies for Part D coverage yearly so it is always good to do a review during the annual open enrollment period.

 

You may want to talk over these meds with your doctor(s) since it is the philosophy of Medicare that Part D plans encourage the use of generics to keep down cost.

 

 

 

 

 

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It might be difficult to understand as a new enrollee with "Medicare" regarding drug coverage. Plan F is by far the best as you never see any co-pays, decutibles and if aprovider charges more than what Medciare allows as approval Plan F pays for everything. Now regarding the drug part d, which is mandatory as an addition to any of the Supplemental Plans (under the Government rules :not just AARP or United Healthcare), ALL prescription drug coverage no matter what company you are with, by law, must substitue name brands for generic (unless your doctor writes a valid reason why the generic will no work for the patient) This rule also applies to any "complete plans that will replace name brands for generic (unless a doctor writes of letter of needed approval). 

I have never heard of a doctor bad mouthing any memeber of the healthcare profession (doctors or providers) so if the doctor in question did such a commnet and is reluctant to write a necessary letter, which I am sure he has needed to do numerous times (I would question the doctor and not the insurance provider).Note: As my memory serves me as when I did have private insurance before 65 (and not Medicare) name branded drugs were simple to get with a simple script But Medicare has strick government rules that must apply for cost savings accross the board. If you do not like United Healthcare and the Plan F and drug coverage you can shop around (but honeslty my fear is that all the providers will be the same)


@GailL1 wrote:

@r58721w wrote:

United Healthcare is the worst!

Since just starting Medicare, I was told that Plan F was the best.

However, the perscriptions was a separate plan,, no problem, got that throught them as well.....BIG MISTAKE.

I take only 2 meds,,,Protonix & Zetonna (an inhaler) thats it..

My PC had to stop his work and dedicate time to write why I needed the name brand as other products previously tried never worked and resulred in many hospital visits, The generic does not work, as well...

They finally accepted the doctors orders and decided to pay a portion of this drug, that I have taken for years.

Now we get to the Zetonna, another drug they still refuse to help cover.

My ENT doctor just phoned me, on a Sunday no less, to see if I was all set in getting ths covered,,,,

He was very upset when I told him once again it was denied.

He said this group is nothing but "smoke & mirrors" and he's right/

5 times this man has filled out paperwork and sent it in and still, whoever makes this decision in UHC  to decline this med, better have a doctorate degree,

I think its disgusting that some office worker decides what a patient is in need of.

So right now for this spray I pay 750.00.

I am sorry I ever got involved with UHC and I am very sorry that AARP is involved with them...


I believe that your problem may have less to do with any particular Medicare Part D insurer and more to do with the meds which have been prescribed for you.

 

Since you have decided to stay with Original Medicare (with a supplemental policy to pick up the cost slack), you do have to pick a free standing Medicare Prescription Drug Coverage plan (Part D).

However, you can pick from several different insurance companies that are offering this coverage in your area.

 

Your selection criteria should be based on medicines which you use which are offered on their formulary.  

 

I am not sure that you are gonna find Protonix on a Medicare Part D Insurance plan in brand form since there is an equivalent generic.  Medicare Drug plans would cover the generic of Protonix ( pantoprazole ) - FACT: FDA requires generic drugs to have the same quality and performance as brand name drugs. FDA: Understanding Generic Drugs

 

You will find generics used in the place of brands on many medications and if you really want the brand, then you will have to have your doc ask for the exception as you did and pay the extra cost.

 

GoodRx.com indicates the difference in price in generic vs brand and states that Medicare only covers the generic form.

 

However, you can always check other plans by going through the Medicare Plan Finder (link below) for the brand name to see if any Part D plans do offer these meds on their formulary in brand form.

 

When Open Enrollment opens in the fall of this year, go to this  Medicare site and do personalized search for a better / different Part D plan if there is one, to suite your needs better.

MEDICARE Plan Finder

 

There is a video on the right side of the page if you need to see how to use it.  But here you will be able to list your meds and see what all the companies offering these meds in a Medicare Drug Plan in your area offer - then you can pick the best one for your current needs.  Remember, you can change companies for Part D coverage yearly so it is always good to do a review during the annual open enrollment period.

 

You may want to talk over these meds with your doctor(s) since it is the philosophy of Medicare that Part D plans encourage the use of generics to keep down cost.

 

 

 

 

 


 

Contributor

Gail,,

I know what I was told...

At the time I was assured  the 2 meds I asked about, would be covered, I repeated "Brand Name", was told yes..

As I said, they finally agreed to the Protonix.

I have tried several generics, please read again what I wrote, none worked.

The doctor, (who knows much more than some fool sitting behind a desk), understands what works for my health.

These people who dictate what you can have are ridiculous, much like your statement.

Please don't email me with nonsence.

Their rating is as low as it can go.......

 

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Just trying to help you understand the Medicare Prescription Drug Program and why your cost maybe so high and IF there maybe something you can do about it.

 

Shop your Medicare Part D plan during open enrollment, there could be an insurer that has them on their formulary - (doubtful, but maybe)

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Obviously, you don't understand English..

I know what I will do come open enrollment/

Now for the last time....

Leave me alone.

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 First, i want to thank you for your service and sacrifice BUT a Medicare Supplement DOES NOT.....REPEAT DOES NOT cover medications.  No Medicare Supplement from any carrier covers medications.  So if your AARP Medicare Supplement does not approve a medication it is because by law, they are not allowed to cover them.  You have to have a Part D plan for your medications and that could be with any carrier and does not have to be with the same carrier as your Medicare Supplement.  Second, heavy pain meds now have new government imposed restrictions on them because of their value as street drugs so yes, they can be more difficult to get and yes, people are suffering because of these federal government imposed restrictions.  Instead of camping out in front of the Medicare SUPPLEMENT office, who has no power to help you, camp out in front of your Congressman or Senators office because that is where the problem lies. 

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@Hassiman wrote:

Hi,
AARP's Medicare Supplemental Medicare Insurance sounds great... but I decided that before I purchase it I should read the reviews.

I was astounded! Consumer affairs reviews were the worst I have EVER seen for any product or service from any company.

 


This topic gets a lot of hits. Please note that the question was first asked two years ago and then a few comments were made in 2016 and about a dozen have been made since mid March 2017. Take all of them with that timing in mind as well as keep in mind that the private Medicare supplement insurance discussed here -- from AARP or anyone else -- varies from state to state in price, discount structures and what it may or may not cover. It even varies in terms if all 'Plans' -- A, C, F, G, and so forth -- are available. Some states do not even have 'Plans' that use the lettering system.  In some states there is continuous, open enrollment but in some states that is not true. You need to look only at the plans available in your states to do a comparison.

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Newbie

Every "letter" plan has identical coverage in all states and D.C.
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Gold Conversationalist


@diginsburg wrote:
Every "letter" plan has identical coverage in all states and D.C.

Your statement is accurate with some very small differences. That is not the point however of this thread. Not all private Medigap "letter plan" Medicare supplements are offered in all states and insurance companies do not even offer private "letter plan" Medigap insurance in some states (it's against those states' laws although they have similar policies to some of the letter plans--some better and some worse).

 

Also the prices vary widely even in state and guaranteed enrollment rules differ widely across state lines even for the same letter plan from the same insurance company. Private Medigap insurance is controlled by your state of legal residence when you sign up (see Note); those policies are the only thing you should compare.

 

Note: State of legal residence is even an issue so make sure you think that through if you intend to or might move later

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Trusted Contributor

"Note: State of legal residence is even an issue so make sure you think that through if you intend to or might move later."

 

State of legal residence is only an issue when the policy is first issued.  If you move states thereafter, the policy follows you and is still valid.  This is great for insurers that issue policies in New York (where costs are expensive) and the policy holder moves to West Virginia (where costs are relatively inexpensive) but bad for insurers who issue a policy in West Virginia and the policy holder then moves to New York!  (Not that many people would move from WV to NY!)

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@sktn77a wrote:

"Note: State of legal residence is even an issue so make sure you think that through if you intend to or might move later."

 

State of legal residence is only an issue when the policy is first issued.  If you move states thereafter, the policy follows you and is still valid.  This is great for insurers that issue policies in New York (where costs are expensive) and the policy holder moves to West Virginia (where costs are relatively inexpensive) but bad for insurers who issue a policy in West Virginia and the policy holder then moves to New York!  (Not that many people would move from WV to NY!)


Perhaps you did not mean to trivialize this subject with the words "only an issue when the policy is first" written.  But just in case some future reader thinks the word "only" implies that this is no big deal, it is a big deal. If where you live legally when you are first eligible for or sign up for a Medicare supplement is different than where you think you might end up legally residing, you need to think this through because some states have open, continuous sign up with community rating and others have various types of retrictions related to pre-existing conditions and age rating  with and without discounts (or some different mix of these characteristics)

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Periodic Contributor

I have had AARP/UHC Supplemental Plan F for 11 years since I retired.   I continue to be very happy with my plan.  The premiums do increase each year, but the increases are comparable to other companies and the customer service I receive is a blessing.   I recommended the same policy to my sister who retired a couple of years after I did, and she is also very happy with the plan.    I will continue to recommend this plan, and I intend to keep it for the rest of my days.  Thank you United Health Care!

 

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Honored Social Butterfly

I've only been on Medicare a year and a half and have the AARP Plan F. I'm happy. I see the doc every three months, have various blood tests, and have yet to pay for anything out-of-pocket except for meds. 


"...Why is everyone a victim? Take personal responsibility for your life..."
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A couple of months ago, I had two issues to address--get a new AARP card mailed and a United Healthcare Part D Supplement ID. I went ahead and printed the online card while waiting, which had the same membership number printed on my AARP Chase Visa Rewards credit card, but when the mail arrived I had a new AARP membership number. I called United Healthcare and was informed that my old number was now my Part D Supplement insurance policy number, so I orderwd an ID card for that over the phone. Now I get loads of junk mail asking if I would like to try and qualify for a United Healthcare policy wveryday, but no insurance supplement card to go with the Medicare card I have had since August of 1989.

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I am a 69 year old female and live in Ohio.  I have been on the United Healthcare Supplelmental Plan F insurance since I turned 65.   I have been completely happy with the plan and have not had any problems what so ever.   I like the plan because there is no paperwork involved, I can go to any doctor and hospital I want without any referrals, the customer service has been good, my doctors always get paid with no problems, and it is the most convenient of all the plans.  I have my monthly insurance fee paid electronically, so I rarely need to give my medical insurance a second thought.     I suggest you read all the information regarding all plans to educate yourself on making the best choice for you.  Their website provides lot of useful information and comparison charts.   The Supplemental Plan F is probably the most expensive, but I feel it is worth it for all the options and convenience factors.   I cannot respond to problems others have had -- this feedback is only based upon my own experience for the past 4 years.  

Good luck to you. 

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My wife and I have had the Plan F Supplemental coverage via AARP/UHC for two years. We are very happy with the plan.  We have no co-pays.  However, be advised that the plan cost has increased 7.5% per year since we signed on.  We started out at $265 a month and now we are at $306 a month.  I created a spreadsheet projecting a 7.5% cost increase over the next 20 years and there is definitely a point where the coverage will no longer be affordable and it looks for us like it will be when we are in our mid-70's.

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Did you figure in that after age 75 the price increases drop in HALF?
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Contributor

You've commented 5 times in one day and 4 more times in March... calm down! You're flooding other commenters inbox. 

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