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Re: Changing AARP / UHC Supplemental (Medigap) Plans with No Underwriting

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Message 11 of 20

The 30% discount is not uniform across all states. I believe it only applies in community rated states.


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Re: Changing AARP / UHC Supplemental (Medigap) Plans with No Underwriting

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Message 12 of 20

United Healthcare/AARP – Discount Program

 

    

  1. Age 65 and Older Only:

 

 

  1. Beneficiaries who are WITHIN 3 years of their 65th birthday (or within 3 years of their Medicare Part B start date, if later) will pay the Base Rate reduced by the *Early Enrollment Discount.

 

*The Early Enrollment Discount    -   The discount will be 30% at age 65, 27% at age 66, reducing by 3% after each 12 month period until the discount decreases to 0% when they will pay the Base Rate thereafter (e.g. 67-24%, 68-21%, 69-18%, 70-15%,

71-12%, 72-9%, 73-6%, 74-3%, 75-0%). 

 

  1. Rates for members who enroll MORE than 3 years AFTER their 65th birthday (or more than 3 years after their Medicare Part B start date, if later) will be based on their responses to underwriting questions.

                                                   

1)         Applicants who DO NOT have a serious health condition will receive the *Early Enrollment Discount as long as they enroll WITHIN 6 years after their 65th birthday (or within 6 years of their Medicare Part B start date, if later.)

                                                

2)         Applicants who DO NOT have a serious health condition and enroll MORE than 6 years after their 65th birthday (or more than 6 years after their Medicare Part B start date, if later) will pay the Tier 1 rates, (which are 10% higher than the Base Rates.)

                                                                          

3)         Applicants who are enrolling MORE than 3 years after their 65th birthday (or more than 3 years after their Medicare Part B start date, if later) whose responses indicate they HAVE a serious health condition will pay Tier 2 rates, (which are 50% higher than the Base Rates.)             

                    

 

  1. Guaranteed Issue Situations -  In Guaranteed Issue Situations:  1) companies cannot turn you down for Medigap Plans A, B, C, F, K or L  because of poor health, and 2) must cover all of your pre-existing conditions, and 3) can’t charge you more for the policy because of past or present health problems. (See Medicare Publication No. 02110, Choosing a Medigap Policy:  A Guide to Health Insurance for People with Medicare for a listing of the Guaranteed Issue Situations). 

 

 

Contact Company Directly For “YOUR” Premium Amount

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Re: Changing AARP / UHC Supplemental (Medigap) Plans with No Underwriting

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Message 13 of 20

As evidenced by the other responses in this thread, there is no consensus. 

 

CMS (Medicare) has one set of rules. States are allowed flexibility to deviate from federal laws but only if their plans and rules are not more restrictive than federal guidelines. Some states have been granted the ability to design non-standardized Medigap plans.

 

CMS offers guidelines about when a carrier may NOT use underwriting to determine acceptance but is silent on deviations such as anniversary or birthday rules (which are state specific). Nor do federal guidelines apply to rate making.

 

UHC has for many years allowed changes from one plan to another without underwriting. This was a company practice, not contractual. I am not aware of any other carrier that has this feature.

 

Moving from one plan to another without underwriting allows the policyholder to "play the system" to their advantage. Carriers understand this adverse selection and make allowances for it in their pricing.

 

UHC also has more liberal underwriting than most carriers and is willing to issue a policy that would be denied by other carriers. There is also a price for this, considerably higher than "standard" rates if you go in this direction.

 

UHC has in fact decided to eliminate the seamless move from one plan to another in some states. They are also dropping Silver Sneakers in several states.

 

Neither of these "benefits" were contractual and could be modified or changed at any time.

 

Only one thing is true. You can change your Medicare supplement plan any time you want. Same carrier or different carrier. Same plan or different plan. But in most states underwriting may be required. There are no "one size fits all" rules or guidelines.

 

If you rely on an oral representation and don't verify it against the policy verbiage you may find yourself disappointed in the future. Oral advice by a carrier representative, someone at Medicare.gov, SHIP, and agent or the person who styles your hair is worthless unless that promise is backed up in writing by the carrier.

 

I visit a lot of consumer forums and most of what is considered advice by forum participants is incorrect, incomplete, confusing or all of the above.

 

Don't get me wrong. Occasionally there are some gems but most of the responses are questionable at best.

 

There are Medicare experts out there but they are hard to find. Consider yourself fortunate if you do stumble across a good one.

 

Don't just assume that because someone is a volunteer or is paid a salary that they are unbiased and knowledgeable. Likewise don't avoid advice from an agent because they are paid a commission. How someone is paid is not an issue. The only thing that matters is the advice is sound and you are allowed to make a decision without pressure to "act now".

 

Ask questions. Listen to the answers. Make notes. Whether you choose to buy direct from a carrier, through Medicare direct, from a volunteer or an agent. Trust but verify.

 

Approach this as if you are interviewing someone for a job. That job is to be your advisor, not just now but ongoing.

 

Good luck.

 

 


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Re: Changing AARP / UHC Supplemental (Medigap) Plans with No Underwriting

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Message 14 of 20

All good info and advice. It is ashamed that healthcare has to be so complex in the USA.

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Re: Changing AARP / UHC Supplemental (Medigap) Plans with No Underwriting

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Message 15 of 20

@JohnL900627 wrote:

Okay. I just changed from AARP Plan F to G. Not a problem as long as you are within 3 years of your original signup at 65. No underwritting. Now if you are older, I think that the same AARP rules apply as if you are signing up for a new plan: answering health questions for those within 6 years of 65 to determine rates, and for those more than 6 years from 65 full underwritting with higher rates almost certain making change likely prohibitive for most.


Everybody needs to understand the rules of coverage of Medigap (Medicare Supplemental) plans.  It is GAP insurance, nothing more, nothing less - the beneficiary picks and pays for the amount of GAP coverage they want based on their alphabet plan choice.

 

Medigap coverage is an OPTIONAL coverage - it is NOT mandated by CMS (Medicare).  It is PRIVATE insurance coverage - gap coverage.  

 

CMS (Medicare) makes the rules as to the various plan coverage. They also make the rules as to when guaranteed issue is applicable or not.  They set down a few ways which the insurance companies can rate (assign premiums).  Community-rated, Age-rated, and Attained Age.  Unless your state limited these manors of rating to a particular type, then an insurance can use their choice to come up with your premiums - And Yes, there is a big difference between them in premium cost.  

 

Since this PRIVATE insurance, a state can make further rules.  Example is the "birthday rule" in California as to when a beneficiary can change plans. There are other state rules - state specific.

 

Pay attention and know how all these things work when you are selecting a Medigap plan.  Especially when you are comparing one insurer to anothe for the same Medigap plan.  

 

And bear in mind, that the ONLY thing that you are assured of with a Medigap coverage is the amount of the GAP coverage you are getting with the plan selected. 

 

There are NO other benefits that have to be covered - any that might be offered is purely a marketing enhancement and can be taken away with the bat of an eye.

 

It is up to the insurance company to underwrite or not when changing insurers or even changing to a more lucrative plan.  Not the broker, the insurance company because the insurance company has the final say.

 

Do not cancel your old policy until you have the new one - signed, sealed and delivered and you know your coverage and premium.  Do this even if yu have to pay premiums on both policies for a month because that is the only way you can get the old one back if there is any problem.  I have already posted the Medicare rule about this 30 day look-see period.

 

i just don't want anybody here to get screwed by not understanding the rules.

Federal and State rules.

 

 

 

* * * * It's Always Something . . . Roseanne Roseannadanna
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Re: Changing AARP / UHC Supplemental (Medigap) Plans with No Underwriting

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Message 16 of 20

Okay. I just changed from AARP Plan F to G. Not a problem as long as you are within 3 years of your original signup at 65. No underwritting. Now if you are older, I think that the same AARP rules apply as if you are signing up for a new plan: answering health questions for those within 6 years of 65 to determine rates, and for those more than 6 years from 65 full underwritting with higher rates almost certain making change likely prohibitive for most.

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Re: Changing AARP / UHC Supplemental (Medigap) Plans with No Underwriting

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Message 17 of 20

Just received a 9/5/18 letter from my agent indicating that they " were notified by UHC 'that effective October 1, 2018, they will no longer allow plan changes for their AARP Medicare Supplement Insurance Plans without medical underwriting' ".

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Re: Changing AARP / UHC Supplemental (Medigap) Plans with No Underwriting

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Message 18 of 20
What does "without underwriting" mean?
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Re: Changing AARP / UHC Supplemental (Medigap) Plans with No Underwriting

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Message 19 of 20

As of 60 days ago I could switch my United Health care plan F supplement to plan G without any underwriting. However I was cautioned that it’s possible this could change some time in the future, but as of now no problem changing lettered plans under the umbrella of UHC supplement plans. That’s one of the reasons I selected AARP/UHC. There might be other companies that allow you to switch plans without being underwritten but I didn’t find any 3 years ago.

 

Now as far as changing a discontinued “I” plan to a current letter plan I have no idea.

 

As you know discontinued plans H, I, J had either prescription or home healthcare or both included.

 

Why don’t you call them on behalf of an elderly friend just to find out? There’s nothing wrong with that.

 

 

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Changing AARP / UHC Supplemental (Medigap) Plans with No Underwriting

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Message 20 of 20

I understand from reading a few posters here that UHC allows people to switch their AARP /UHC supplemental plans without underwriting.  Is this correct?

 

I am asking because a friend of mine was trying to switch her mother from an old Plan I (this is an old plan, not offered since 2010) to a Plan N and they told her that IF the plan was not "modern" then there would be underwriting.

 

So I am just mentioning this here to see if anybody has had any experience with this because I know several others who are considering switching their AARP/UHC Plan F after 2020 if rates start to go up somewhat drastically or if they just want to change.  BUT IF this is the case about the underwriting, they may want to consider earlier.

 

?????????????????

* * * * It's Always Something . . . Roseanne Roseannadanna
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