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Re: Birdwatching: Local Open Space Parks

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Message 21 of 40

Greetings from Texas. Good morning Epster from Colorado. I guess it's been a while since I've spoken to you. I hope you and your family are well. Yes, I know it's early. Coudn't sleep. Yes, I love the wild birds. I have 1 platform feeder and several hanging feeders. I fill the hanging feeders with black oil sunflower seed. That feeds cardinals, tufted titmouses, carolina chickadees. The platform feeder I use to feed the big birds. Depending on the season. That feeds many different varieties of birds. Red headed woodpeckers, red bellied woodpeckers, blue jays, and lest I forget. A large family of crows. Everyone enjoys my cornbread. Yes sir, yes ma'am, I make them a pan of cornbread. I have a male red bellied woodpecker that meets me as I come off the front porch. He follows me through the yard. Jumping from tree to tree until I reach the platform feeder. There is a tree right beside the feeder. He hangs there waiting on me to crumble up the corbread. Then I step back a few feet and he lands on the feeder. Looking at me and eating cornbread. Does feeding the birds cornbread make me a redneck? Smiley Very Happy Oh well, at least I don't have a recliner in the front yard.Smiley LOL Please have yourself a wonderful day, Epster, from Colorado       

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Re: Birdwatching: Local Open Space Parks

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Message 22 of 40

What bird species do you see most frequently?

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Re: Birdwatching: Local Open Space Parks

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Message 23 of 40

@2Papa wrote:

I like watching the birds at our feeders in the back yard.  Every now and then, a hawk swoops by and hits a dove.  The feathers really fly!  We don't discriminate on what birds we feed. After all, the hawks have to eat too!  


@2Papa Yes, hawks have to eat too. I prefer to watch them catch mice out in the field, however. Smiley Happy I've seen kestrels pick off sparrows that were focused on eating. And watched, horrified, as a blue jay stole the hatchlings from a mourning dove nest built right outside our dining room window. But around here it's the feral felines (barn cats) that probably do the bird population the most damage.

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Re: Birdwatching: Local Open Space Parks

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Message 24 of 40

@ip3285 wrote:

We have bird feeders hanging ourside the living room picture window that attract different birds depending upon the season, and they type of feeder and food in the feeders.  There are bird houses in many of the trees around our 2 1/2 acre property that also attract various birds, and we're always delighted when we realize that there have been babies born in one of them.

    The barn owl box that's away from the house, but in view of the picture window, brings back the same two barn owls every year, and one year they produced three adorable babies, which we watched learn to fly. 

    In addition, there are the peacocks who live on another road.  They jump the fences and come to see what we have growing in the garden.  If they like what they see, they help themselves!

   Then there are the murders of crows, the hawks and others. We have bird charts so we can identify any unusual bird. 

   My neighbor, who lives about 1/2 mile from us but with nothing but open space between us, also has bird feeders.  Often we'll both get a strange bird at our feeder. We email each other to watch out for the different birds.  It's all very interesting, informative, and sometimes exciting.


@ip3285 Thanks so much for sharing these vignettes. Sounds like you live in birdwatching heaven.  We live on small acerage, near many farms and the forest, so we get to see a nice variety of birds. Because we also have bears, we don't put out feeders anymore. I do keep a birdbath and waterer out for our feathered friends. 

 

I agree, birdwatching is interesting, informative and sometimes exciting. Also sometimes sad: this May I watched a robin couple build a nest in one of our junipers, then lay and hatch a clutch only to lose them all in a late snowstorm. That was heartbreaking. They built a second nest and had a second clutch and I did get to see the youngsters eating juniper berries a couple weeks ago, so I guess it ended well. Well-ish.

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Re: Birdwatching: Local Open Space Parks

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Message 25 of 40

We have bird feeders hanging ourside the living room picture window that attract different birds depending upon the season, and they type of feeder and food in the feeders.  There are bird houses in many of the trees around our 2 1/2 acre property that also attract various birds, and we're always delighted when we realize that there have been babies born in one of them.

    The barn owl box that's away from the house, but in view of the picture window, brings back the same two barn owls every year, and one year they produced three adorable babies, which we watched learn to fly. 

    In addition, there are the peacocks who live on another road.  They jump the fences and come to see what we have growing in the garden.  If they like what they see, they help themselves!

   Then there are the murders of crows, the hawks and others. We have bird charts so we can identify any unusual bird. 

   My neighbor, who lives about 1/2 mile from us but with nothing but open space between us, also has bird feeders.  Often we'll both get a strange bird at our feeder. We email each other to watch out for the different birds.  It's all very interesting, informative, and sometimes exciting.

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Re: Birdwatching: Local Open Space Parks

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Message 26 of 40

I like watching the birds at our feeders in the back yard.  Every now and then, a hawk swoops by and hits a dove.  The feathers really fly!  We don't discriminate on what birds we feed. After all, the hawks have to eat too!  

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Re: Birdwatching: Local Open Space Parks

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Message 27 of 40

@JenniF wrote:

Audubon also has an excellent app that I use on my phone and can use it in "airplane" mode if I do not want to use my phone "data".  


@JenniF Good to know! Smiley Happy DH and I have been slowly working our way through apps. BirdSnap is the one we use most often, but one needs a cell connection for it to work (you snap a picture of the bird and the app IDs it) It sounds better than it is because it only works live.

 

Sibley's app, too, is meh. So says DH. 

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Re: Birdwatching: Local Open Space Parks

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Message 28 of 40

Audubon also has an excellent app that I use on my phone and can use it in "airplane" mode if I do not want to use my phone "data".  

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Re: Birdwatching: Local Open Space Parks

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Message 29 of 40

@JenniF wrote:

The site ebird.org by Cornell University is an excellent resource for local hot spots persuade and much more


Hi @JenniF and welcome to the online community. Thanks for posting about ebird.org

 

I agree, Cornell's online birding resources are nothing short of wonderful. 

 

This is the Cornell site I like to go to if I don't have a field guide, and sometimes just to double check information: https://www.allaboutbirds.org

 

 

 

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Re: Birdwatching: Local Open Space Parks

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Message 30 of 40

The site ebird.org by Cornell University is an excellent resource for local hot spots persuade and much more

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